<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=996690293685739&ev=PageView&noscript=1" />
67
Comments
Sue Kiene
Last reply on Sep 5, 2016

Does anyone have any idea what we can do with is front yard nightmare?

67
Comments
Sue Kiene
Last reply on Sep 5, 2016

grass will not go because of the pine trees. Any thoughts or ideas would help me so much.
Sent from my iPad

30  of  67 comments
  • Nancy Hand
    Nancy Hand Enigma, GA
    on Jun 10, 2013

    Your going to need some top soil to cover the roots then lay sod, and keep watered.

  • Melinda
    Melinda Brighton, TN
    on Jun 10, 2013

    You need some landscaping. Something tall on each corner like a Crepe Myrtle, some lower bushes across the front. Cut the current bush back. You could put some retaining blocks in across the front and add dirt to cover roots. Add Shade loving plants. Check out my blog for some ideas, http://simplebutfabulous.blogspot.com

  • Linda Young
    Linda Young Sicklerville, NJ
    on Jun 10, 2013

    I think covering the roots can kill the tree, so try planting Ajuga, Pachysandra, or Ivy. But watch, they can be invasive and grow to where you don't want them.

    • Ashley Jade Epperson
      Ashley Jade Epperson Tunnel Hill, GA
      on Feb 25, 2015

      Please don't think I am being rude either. I hate it when people are rude on here. I just read ur comment and worried for u and Amy both. If I could go back in time and have some of my trees cut down... I would. My dad says they are an energy saver but it's so short term. I'm spending more than I ever have or will be able to save now on septic work and foundation work. So not worth it in the long run.

  • Virginia
    Virginia Gainesville, GA
    on Jun 10, 2013

    Cut trees, pressure wash house, lay sod. Cut those over sized bushes in front of the house or pull them out. Replace the bushes w/gardenia (they are evergreens). Chop up those roots & try to get as many out as you can before you sod. Seeding won't work. Nothing will EVER grow until you get those trees out. Get em gone. Just knotch them so they don't fall on the house & have the guy cutting have a heavy duty pull rope around that tree, so another BIG guy or truck can encourage it to fall AWAY from the house. Call around for pallets of sod from sod farms to save $$$. Seeding will not work. My husband & I have cut bigger trees than this, in front of the house, so this is doable. You just have to know what you are doing. Get a major chain saw, 2 Mexican guys from Atlanta hwy. (ask them if they know how to cut down a big tree first).

  • Mary Insana
    Mary Insana Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jun 10, 2013

    @Virginia Can't any qualified men or woman cut their trees down? Why would they need 2 Mexican guys from Atlanta? Especially since @Amy Ward Stanley is from Athens AL ?

  • Virginia
    Virginia Gainesville, GA
    on Jun 10, 2013

    welllll, I was looking to do it on the cheap.... if she had some "qualified men" around I thought she would already know that. lol I thought she said Athens, GA... oh dear, yes, you are right she is in AL! ROAD TRIP? (no?).... didn't think so. We've used Mexican guys off the hwy to do some stuff around here. They worked hard. There just were no guys willing to get really down & dirty for $10 an hour. So, that was my thinking (when it has to be done on a budget).

  • Nicky Blakeney
    Nicky Blakeney Taylorsville, MS
    on Jun 10, 2013

    I agree the trees need to go, beside killing the grass, they block the view of and from the house. I don't think that Virginia thought about where the house is located, but I would say get a professional to cut them. Check with your city Government or the utility companies, they may be able to cut the trees or recommend some one to do it. There are also people (here anyway) that can grind up the stumps and get them out of the way. If possible a retaining wall would be nice but another idea would be to level the yard where the trees are and add 2 or 3 step downs from the right corner of the house curved toward the front and let them come to nothing and fill with flowers, etc, accent with steps, a water feature, and/or a birdbath. The Large bush at the front could be moved to the right corner of the house, a tall slim scrub to the left of the window, and a matching tree at the left corner of the house, with low flowers & plants with borders between. In your part of the country Azaleas are always a beautiful addition so edge the drive and the land line on the right with them to frame the yard and house. Now all you have to supply is the money and the work. lol Have a great Summer.

  • Lori J
    Lori J Broken Bow, NE
    on Jun 10, 2013

    Could landscape up a bit with a short retaining wall and backfill with top soil to level things out a bit?Is there something about the needles that kills the grass?

  • Kimberly Barney
    Kimberly Barney Clarksville, TN
    on Jun 10, 2013

    With the slope of the yard, I believe you would do best to add a few short retaining walls across the front at different heights making planting areas between the walls which could be made with railroad ties before you do anything else. Then I would add bring in some top soil to fill these new planting areas and cover the area under the trees with mulch placing some hardscape (i.e. birdbath, birdhouses, large boulders, seating).

  • Patricia W
    Patricia W Eugene, OR
    on Jun 10, 2013

    Love the retaining wall idea. Remember. what you plant near the exposed roots of that tree, if they are active live roots, will suck moisture from lawn and plants. Plant acid loving shrubs, like Rhodies, azalias, any of those. The needles from the tree are excellent food for some plants! Take advantage of the tree and what it has to offer. Too many people just cut them down. Think about the carbon that conifers and evergreens absorb. Unless the tree is a hazard to your home.

  • Mary Insana
    Mary Insana Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jun 10, 2013

    @Virginia I think you missed my point. By telling @Amy Ward Stanley to get 2 Mexicans was a bit of a racist comment by insinuating that you can pay "Mexicans" less money to do a job.

  • Virginia
    Virginia Gainesville, GA
    on Jun 10, 2013

    LOL, now Mary..... how long did you let that roll around in your head before you typed? I suspect not long. Now, go get a cold drink and sit your fanny down and wait for your husband to come home to pick on. (I suspect the children & Mexicans have run off on ya).

  • Mary Insana
    Mary Insana Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jun 10, 2013

    I just don't think it was very nice to label one nationality. Here on Hometalk there are people from all over the world and your comment may have insulted someone. By the way I'm am not of Mexican decent but I would never call out one nationality. Case closed.

  • Carolyn L
    Carolyn L Clermont, FL
    on Jun 11, 2013

    I had the same problem with the pines in my yard, I had them removed, stumps ground and am getting ready to put in a paver circle drive. Our houses look so similar, I'll be watching you for ideas. Good Luck to us.

  • Dale B
    Dale B Tyler, TX
    on Jun 11, 2013

    I am a landscaper in Tyler, Texas and we have very similar problems with pines. It does not hurt to remove a couple of the exposed roots. I would do a short retaining wall several feet away from the trees and then backfill with good soil being careful not to cover tree roots with more than a couple inches of soil within 3-4' from the tree. Then you could do a free form bed around the trees and fill with acid loving plants like azaleas, camellia, or even hydrangeas if you have enough shade from the pines. Feel free to go to my Blackstone Landscaping page on Facebook if you need planting info or have more questions... Happy Gardening.

  • Mish Ravan
    Mish Ravan Cleveland, GA
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Cut the pine trees, then go from there....we had this problem..had to get rid of some trees then build up the yard a tad...still have some issues but way better now.

  • Jenny@birdsandsoap
    Jenny@birdsandsoap Nampa, ID
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Tiiiiiiiiiiimmmmbeeeerrrr!

  • Barbara Passaro
    Barbara Passaro Hopewell Junction, NY
    on Jun 11, 2013

    I agree...get rid of the trees and grind down the stumps(you'll be happy you did) . We did that last year and have a beautiful front lawn now. Maybe once the lawn comes in you might want to do a planter wall with some ornamental's. Good luck!

  • Susan Cryor
    Susan Cryor Lockport, NY
    on Jun 11, 2013

    pine trees have shallow roots and can come down in a good storm. I personally love them, we have 89 of them, some in the back yard, on three sides and the rest in the front yard. They were carefully planted two in a line the entire way, 25 years ago. But because yours are SO tall, they might prove to be a hazard to your home. I would talk to your insurance company, homeowners about the possible threat to your home. Especially with those roots being exposed. Also, we were advised that we would NEVER be able to grow grass under them, as the soil is to acid. So I planted myrtle, it is not fussy, blooms blue flowers and is a deep green ground cover. We bought this house in Sept....none of the trees had been taken care of, dead branches laying to the ground. First project was to get a professional arborist in to consult. In Maine, you have to have an arborist cut trees. Anyhow he is the one who advised about no grass. Looks like sandy soil, Irish moss is a sandy soil lover....ground cover

  • Amy Ward Stanley
    Amy Ward Stanley Athens, AL
    on Jun 11, 2013

    thanks for all the Advice! My sister and I inherited this house when my father passed away and were trying to fix it up in order to put it on the market. Will update when we decide what to do.

  • Sara Fessenden
    Sara Fessenden Loveland, CO
    on Jun 11, 2013

    We had a house in the mountains of AZ where the whole yard was shaded by pines. Rye grass grew beautifully because its low sun and my horses loved "mowing" it for us :)

  • Vicky Evans
    Vicky Evans Shelley, ID
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Dale B has a very good plan. Don't cut down the trees, they are a good selling point if you landscape around them. It appears they have been there a long time so the soil is thoroughly acidified by the pine needles. If you cut them down you will need to either replace the soil or put massive amounts of something on it to make it alkali enough to grow grass. There are ground covers & shrubs that love acidic soil. Eliminate any sparse grass by cutting a clear edge between the dirt & thick lawn Put in acid loving plants & put down a nice looking bark or stone mulch to cover bare spots. Make it look as maintenance free as possible, buyers love that.

  • Vicky Evans
    Vicky Evans Shelley, ID
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Mary I. you are right. Virginia's comment is very racist. Her attitude that it is ok to pay a "Mexican" less than a good ole southern white boy (according to her post they are all lazy) for hard work is not an admirable trait either. It appears from her nasty little post to you in a southern drawwwwl about sitting down & having a cold drink etc that she is not a very nice person all the way around.

  • Mary Insana
    Mary Insana Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Thanks @Vicky Evans. I appreciate your support :) I didn't want to come off as a prude but I do feel that an open forum like Hometalk is not the place to be labeling certain nationalities.

  • CindyandGeorge Schaeffer
    CindyandGeorge Schaeffer Palm Bay, FL
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Mary I. and Vicky Evans are both correct. The Guidelines for Hometalk are to be "nice." There's nothing "nice" about saying "Hay let's get a couple Mexican's to do it cheap." I'm not Mexican but I am a Southerner - through and through, and that is not only mean spirited but just plain bad manners.

  • Design OCD
    Design OCD Atlanta, GA
    on Jun 11, 2013

    We had this problem in our backyard and put a shade garden bed underneath it with a little retaining wall. http://www.hometalk.com/1469423/landscaping-t...

  • Miriam I
    Miriam I New York, NY
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Hi everyone, Hometalk asks that members keep things friendly and respectful at all times. You can read our guidelines here: http://www.hometalk.com/about/content-guideli... Thank you all for your help and advice and please refrain from further comments on this thread that are not related to Amy's question.

  • S. Mundell
    S. Mundell Suwanee, GA
    on Jun 11, 2013

    oh, my people....let it go! She said she didn't mean it disrespectfully. Just drop it... I'm sure the person who was asking for advice has gotten more abt that reply than what she initially asked advice for!

  • S. Mundell
    S. Mundell Suwanee, GA
    on Jun 11, 2013

    We have the same problem....but I'd rather not cut them they help with keeping the house cooler in the summer. I'm trying ajuga as ground cover but it takes awhile to grow. I Ve got some money coin growing in some of the more shaded areas of the back yard. We have 45 trees in our lot but I'm gonna keep as a many as we can...everyone else has chopped theirs down.:( Hope this helps.;)

  • Cyndi Moore Tippett
    Cyndi Moore Tippett Knightdale, NC
    on Jun 12, 2013

    we just fixed our front yard two months ago. We have 60+ pine trees, so we put pine straw around the trees and then sodded the rest with tall fescue. It added amillion dollars worth of look to our yard. You will probably spend as much in seed as you would if you buy sod and put it down yourself.

Share your thoughts!