<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=996690293685739&ev=PageView&noscript=1" />

Something is eating my collard, cabbage and pepper leaves. Any idea what it is and how I can stop it?

29
Comments
Sherry Breedlove Last reply 7 days ago

My dad, who is doing the gardening, has resorted to putting some type of white power on them. So that is what you see in the photo. I am not sure of the name at present.

Collards
Collards
10  of  29 comments
  • Cathy Rodriguez
    Cathy Rodriguez Lansing, MI
    on Sep 4, 2013

    Baking soda will kill the plants I have been using it around my pool to kill weeds, because the baking soda will not hurt the pool other then changing the PH, it changes the PH of the soil so that plants will not grow. I would not use it round a place where you want to continue to garden. Sevin dust is a horrible pesticide and not something I want on my food, it will totally negate the organic goal and the major reason I grow my own food. My cabbage look like this but not my pepper plants or my squash, and I have looked and looked for bugs and found nothing. I will by the BT and see if it works.

  • Tammy T
    Tammy T Spokane, WA
    on Sep 25, 2013

    Baking soda is Sodium Bicarbonate. Sodium is salt. Plants don't do well in salted soil. I would not recommend it on plants you want

  • Catherine Smith
    Catherine Smith Fredericksburg, VA
    on Sep 25, 2013

    Ladies, you would have to use baking soda by the tractor trailer load in order to effect either ph or the salinity of the soil. Baking soda is a great way to "sweeten" an area that is very acidic and no it's not that kinda "salt" chemically speaking.

  • Cathy Rodriguez
    Cathy Rodriguez Lansing, MI
    on Sep 27, 2013

    You are the one that said it takes truck loads, and it does not, and it is not apples and oranges. I would not use it any where near soil I wanted to continue to grow in. That is my choice, as it is yours. The weeds were all kinds, crab grass, prickers, clover. I do know it has saved me a lot of work, and all I do is sprinkle it on right before a rain and it is safe to use around the pool. I have been putting crushed egg shells around my cabbage and it has worked, and they are good for the soil. No chemicals, no PH changes, and the eggs are organic and range free. Next year I will try the BT, This year they were too far gone, to spend the money so I tried the egg shells to see if they worked, and it seems to be working.

  • Sherrie
    Sherrie Nixa, MO
    on Feb 7, 2014

    I use to be all chemicals because I worked so hard on my garden. Now I have learned many things. One thing I do is rotate my garden every year. This really helps. Then I get up early and pick off the worms and brush off the leaves. I only use natural bug killers which even Walmart sales. Only in dire circumstances will I use chemicals which so far is never. If you get up early and closely look at the leaves you will see green worms. Pick them off, I wear gloves and have a bucket. I also brush off the leaves. And then I rinse off the leaves with my garden hose. I do this every morning. I have a fairly big garden. It takes time. But I have learned by garden flourishes and we eat healthier. If you use Seven Dust wear gloves and a mask. And wash your food several times.

  • Kathleen
    Kathleen Lansdale, PA
    on Mar 30, 2014

    This is a greatposting, and last summer my Cabbage and Collards looked just like these pix-ugh. Glad to see what it is and solutions. Thank you !

  • Cindy tustin
    Cindy tustin Arcadia, KS
    on Mar 30, 2014

    WE have always used wood ash on cabbage I am 66 yrs old and learned this from my grandmother. I lightly mist the plants and sprinkle wood ash on them. Realize everyone doesn't have access to ash. Maybe you know someone that has a fireplace I sift the ash to a fine powder Have one of those powder spreader don't remember the name has a little box with a crank and a tube that dispenses the powder.

  • Cindy woosley
    Cindy woosley Wichita, KS
    on Apr 24, 2015

    Use dish soap. Look on line. They have lots of different recipe for natural bug killers for the garden

  • Carol Fredette
    Carol Fredette Brooksville, FL
    on Jun 2, 2016

    Seven dust or diatomaceous earth is a good bug killer. You will have to reapply if it rains.

  • Bridge1245
    Bridge1245
    on Nov 27, 2016

    Well, I learned from a Great Aunt with a green thumb to sprinkle just white flour not self rising.

    Wow it works everytime!!!! You have to reapply sometimes.

Start a discussion

Have a question or a project you are working on?


­