Erica Glasener
Erica Glasener
  • Hometalker
  • Atlanta, GA
Asked on Dec 1, 2011

Hometalk members in Florida, I need an ID for this plants, friends from Pensacola sent me the photo and I don't

JuliaDONNA JOHazel
+21

Answered

recognize the plant. Thanks.
q hometalk members in florida i need an id for this plants friends from pensacola, gardening
q hometalk members in florida i need an id for this plants friends from pensacola, gardening
22 answers
  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Dec 1, 2011

    interesting, did they mention if it blooms?

  • 3po3
    on Dec 2, 2011

    Can't say I've ever really seen anything like it. Then again, I am a long way from Pensacola.

  • Amy T
    on Dec 2, 2011

    The photo looks like a

  • Amy T
    on Dec 2, 2011

    The photo looks like a plant commonly known as "devil's backbone". I hope that helps. I think they are fairly drought tolerant.

  • Amy T
    on Dec 2, 2011

    The photo looks like a plant commonly known as "devil's backbone". I hope that helps. I think they are fairly drought tolerant.

  • Amy T
    on Dec 2, 2011

    The photo looks like a

  • Yes, one of the common names is Devil's Backbone but it is in the genus Euphorbia and has a white milky sap.

  • Erica Glasener
    on Dec 2, 2011

    thanks all, Euphorbia makes sense, would love to know which one.

  • Erica Glasener
    on Dec 6, 2011

    I need a clarification about a response would like to know the species of Euphorbia

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Dec 7, 2011

    Pedilanthus tithymaloides, Erica, a distant relative of the poinsettia.

  • Erica Glasener
    on Dec 7, 2011

    Thanks Doug. Do you grow this plant? Can you tell me about it?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Dec 7, 2011

    I have seen it in local nurseries, Erica, but I haven't grown it. There's a variegated form as well. Wants filtered light or light shade. Should be fine in the pot you have and "bloom" if happy.

    • Lillian Santana
      on Jun 6, 2015

      @Douglas Hunt Douglas, what is the name of the plant? I am moving back to Mississippi where there actually is shade and would like to try it.

  • Erica Glasener
    on Dec 7, 2011

    Thanks Douglas!

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Dec 7, 2011

    My pleasure, Erica.

  • Elinor C
    on Dec 8, 2011

    Erica, I have one that is the Great Grand Daughter of the original plant my mother picked up in a trash pile on a Florida vacation. I have kept it going by cuttings rooting it in water and then planting in a LARGE pot when well rooted. It is very temperature sensitive. I put it outside in the summer but if the temp drops below 50 degrees before I bring it in the leaves will fall off. I water it lightly during the winter in the house and keep it in a bright window. We always referred to it as Devil's Backbone. The sap will burn your eyes so be very careful not to get it on your hands. Mine is varigated and once when I let it get really pot bound it had small reddish blooms under the bends in the stem. The one I have now is about 3 feet tall!!

  • Lindy Hall
    on May 9, 2015

    Quite toxic... per Wikipedia.

  • Hazel
    on Nov 29, 2015

    I knew it as an old fashioned plant known as Devil's Backbone from the cacti family. It can also grow inside the house.

  • Shirley Turner Wishard
    on Nov 29, 2015

    That is Rosemary.It h

  • Shirley Turner Wishard
    on Nov 29, 2015

    It has a great aroma and is wonderful for cooking.

  • Hazel
    on Nov 30, 2015

    Shirley Turner, That is DEFINITELY not Rosemary!

  • DONNA JO
    on Dec 1, 2015

    It is Devil's backbone, but the sap is poisonous & depending on your allergies, could cause a bad rash. Definitely do not use in cooking. It turns pink in the summer depending on how much light it gets. I had one in a garbage can that grew over 5 ft tall.

  • Julia
    on May 24, 2016

    Donna & Hazel, you are both correct! This is definitely Devil's Backbone. It has been a long time, but if memory serves me correctly, it is easily propagated. Ladies, do you know?

Your comment...