Southern Trillium LLC
Southern Trillium LLC
  • Hometalker
  • Stone Mountain, GA
Asked on Dec 1, 2011

How about a little Weed ID?

Carolyn KinabrewDORLISJames Hicks
+38

Answered

Anyone else know the name of this weed? I know everyone has come across this wonderful thorny weed in their yard. For me, I normally find it after it has already won the battle with my hands and arms. Usually, you can follow the mess of vines and find that skinny little stem heading into the ground, usually with thorns all the way. If you wonder why you can't ever seem to pull it up with the root attached, look at the photos to see what the roots look like. There are even thorns underground. Now you can tell why it take a shovel to literally dig them up.
q how about a little weed id anyone else know the name of this weed i know everyone, gardening, landscape
q how about a little weed id anyone else know the name of this weed i know everyone, gardening, landscape
q how about a little weed id anyone else know the name of this weed i know everyone, gardening, landscape
q how about a little weed id anyone else know the name of this weed i know everyone, gardening, landscape
37 answers
  • Douglas Hunt
    on Dec 2, 2011

    It is nasty stuff! I hate it when my fingers find it before my eyes do!

  • Erica Glasener
    on Dec 2, 2011

    Looks like a smilax?

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Dec 2, 2011

    I agree with Erica, looks like smilax. Here is Walter Reeves on the subject: http://www.walterreeves.com/qa_display.phtml?qaID=2089

  • Southern Trillium LLC
    on Dec 2, 2011

    Erica is correct. I knew it was impossible to pull up, but a few years ago, I decided to dig one up just to photograph the roots/tubers.

  • Sherrie S
    on Dec 2, 2011

    I have a little smilax but far worse is the potato plant that is high on the list of Florida's most invasive plants. It is comparable to Kudzu in growth. The really bad thing is I bought this plant years ago and planted it in my yard. I'm still trying to kill it.

  • Teresa D
    on Dec 2, 2011

    Hmmm, that explains why it keeps coming back. I've pulled these out of my azaleas and other shrubs only to see it winding its way through the following year. My doggies have also come trotting in with a hunk of this stuck to their fur.

  • Thorns underground! What is this plant thinking!

  • Mike and Anne
    on Dec 2, 2011

    Believe it or not southern smilax adorns the entrances to many a home in "Old Raleigh" It's also very expensive if you can find it in the garden center around here. They can have all of mine.

  • Paul M
    on Dec 2, 2011

    It is called Cat's Briar, for obvious reasons. The young tendrils at the new growth area just below the leaves are edible and are listed in many wild edible plant books. Once established they are very difficult to get rid of and the berries that the produce are food for birds, who spread the seeds so that they can wind up anywhere at any time. http://www.google.com/imgres?q=Cats+briar&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1280&bih=878&tbm=isch&tbnid=LCjymhEXDobAIM:&imgrefurl=http://www.pbase.com/image/29256950&docid=kfb0IfJk_SNrkM&itg=1&imgurl=http://i.pbase.com/u45/comafungi/large/29256950.CatsBriar9802.jpg&w=800&h=600&ei=8jLZTtyZE8-Jtwe--ejuAQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=207&vpy=169&dur=376&hovh=184&hovw=248&tx=110&ty=68&sig=114045933214061786329&page=1&tbnh=157&tbnw=217&start=0&ndsp=20&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Dec 2, 2011

    A customer once called them 'the vine from hell'. CP

  • Bob and RodMan S
    on Dec 2, 2011

    Smilax or greenbriar is also a popular food item for deer. They must be very careful munchers.

  • Freeda H
    on Dec 3, 2011

    This is a green brier....Am told that the leaves are slightly bitter but can be eaten.

  • Kim S
    on Dec 3, 2011

    Nearly impossible to kill with Roundup, too. I am tackling a grove of this stuff along a fence line. It's been 3 years and I am almost there!

  • Sonja
    on Dec 3, 2011

    I can't remember name but know they are native to Georgia, have thorns and are prolific. I usually dig them up or mow over them as I see them. I take care they to not grow in my natural area because it is too small to accomodate them.

  • Anna K
    on Dec 4, 2011

    nasty stuff. we usually cut it to the base and paint a tiny amount of brush killer (concentrate-not dilluted) on each fresh cut. haha the foliage photo looks deceivingly like a clematis though...

  • Erica Glasener
    on Dec 5, 2011

    There is a nearly thornless Smilax call the Jackson vine that is ornamental and decorative not a pest

  • Carol G
    on Jul 4, 2012

    That is what I have and cant get rid of It. it has taken over one corner of my yard!! I have been living here for 4 yrs and this is the worst it has been. It is a beautiful vine but it is in my rose bush and my orange tree.I have used round up and all kinds of strong weed killers and still cant get rid of it.It is smothering my rose bush.

  • Carol G
    on Jul 4, 2012

    I have some coming through the floor in my laundry room!! did not know they had a crack there.

  • Pamela F
    on Jul 8, 2012

    I hate, hate, hate this weed! It comes through my fence. I spray it to no avail. I carefully pull them up or cut them with my shovel.

  • Sherrie S
    on Jul 8, 2012

    They are ugly, mean & nasty. The ONLY way I know to stop them is to dig them up. It is a lot work to get the root but well worth it. Roundup didn't do the job.

  • Jimmy S
    on Jul 9, 2012

    Smilax. all too familiar with this weed. Walter Reeves did a segment where his neighbor dug it up by the roots and it was over 18 feet long root system

  • Debbi C
    on Jul 9, 2012

    As an "oldie but a goodie", we have always referred to this as 'Devils Claw' here in AL...Ouch! Those stickers will send you to the moon! I have some that have vines as big as small tree trunks and hundred feet high into my trees here on our homestead. I just leave most of them alone. They are great for the soil underground.

  • Joann Davis
    on Aug 10, 2014

    it is called saw brier here not good for lawn mower tires

  • Joann Davis
    on Aug 10, 2014

    the brown stuff looks like ginseng it is worth money

  • Sally Roesner Fuhr
    on Aug 10, 2014

    The thorns appear only on the first year or two. It is called buckthorn and is very invasive. They produce tiny black berries, which birds eat, roost and deposit everywhere. It looks almost like a tropical plant and climbs like ivy. The bare vines make neat wreaths because of its tendrils and won't reseed itself without the berries. We have programs to eradicate it in western Illinois parks and riverbanks as it crowds out the native plants, of which it isn't.

  • DORLIS
    on Aug 22, 2014

    we always called it cardinal vine. don't ask me why, just always heard it called that. invasive and can make a mess of you, scratches all over. i am trying baking soda on this, creeping myrtle and bush honeysuckle and poison ivy this year. it changes the ph of the soil and is suspossed to stop anything.

  • Delores Snellen
    on Aug 22, 2014

    Try Groundclear it is cheaper than roundup and suppose to last a year some vines will come back so spray again I talked to roundup and they said their stuff is only good for a month unless you buy the extended version (of course more money ) Groundclear clears everything

  • Rosannadanna
    on Jan 24, 2015

    Spay Roundup on the leafy parts during growing season, spring and summer. It kills mine. Paint it on smaller plants if needed, just be sure it gets on the leaves.

  • Francisco37388
    on Mar 26, 2015

    Saw Briar. Wild animals (deer, beaver, etc.) eat the soft tips for food. It is non poisonous tho. I have eaten the tender tips and they are much like spinach. When you use chemicals to eradicate 'weeds' please be cautious and only apply to the plant you are working on. Do not broadcast it - it will kill everything it touches and the residue stays in the grounds for awhile. The residue will then prevent further sprouting of anything - good, bad or otherwise. And it isn't good for you to inhale or get on your exposed skin.

  • Brenda Adams
    on May 4, 2015

    Yes, I have it in one of my flower beds, and I can't get it out. It runs rampant. If I spray Roundup on it, it will kill my roses and my Yucca Plants. I'm just to old to dig this all out and then transplant what I want to keep. Will this "Groundclear" kill my other plants in the flower bed? I need HELP!!!!

    • DORLIS
      on Jun 13, 2016

      @Brenda Adams Cut the stems close to the ground and then use Tordon. Use a small foam bruch to paint the cut stems so you do not kill the plants you want. This is the only solution for bush Honeysuckle here in Missouri. This thing is taking over the woods. Even the conservation department can't keep it down.

  • Carol G
    on May 4, 2015

    I finally found something to get rid of it! Industrial weed killer from the city. A friend of mine that works for the city gave me some in a container an added abut a cup f water and sprayed it early in the morn. Now it is all gone! ....FINALLY!

  • DORLIS
    on May 4, 2015

    Try cutting the vine and use a cheap foam brush to paint the Round-up on the cut stump. zIt may take several trys, but it should work. You also may want to try using a stronger weed killer as there are some thing Round-up can't kill. For a safer way, use 1 gallon vinegar, 1 cup epsom slats or baking soda and 1/4 c Dawn . Again, it may take several times, but it does get the job done. Just don't et it on the plants you want to save.

  • Caroline Johnson Curran
    on Jun 12, 2016

    It is smilax. Best way to eradicate is still difficult. If you look it up, there are some suggestions.

  • Sally Cook
    on Aug 1, 2016

    "Chaney Briar," I think... Southern name?

  • James Hicks
    on Sep 18, 2016

    I was told almost 50 years ago it a Saw Briar That what my Grand Father told me.

  • DORLIS
    on Sep 19, 2016

    it even grows in the woods, where you get your foot caught in it and stumble. Then it walks into your yard before you realize it. glad to know how to get rid of it,

  • Carolyn Kinabrew
    on Sep 27, 2016

    Looks like a saw briar to me. They keep my husband's arms torn up when he cleaning the flower beds.

Your comment...