Brooke
Brooke
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Asked on Dec 8, 2011

Need help!

LandlightSHDK Electrical EnterprisesKMS Woodworks
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Answered

Honest electrician wanted! Desperate homeowner needs advice and guidance on proper procedures and code specification. Built addition to house. Removed old panel, installed new panel and meter. Trench dug from out door outlet/box to detached/stand alone garage building. Electric work to garage includes: outside outlet, inside light and outside security light. Does this type of work require a separate permit and inspection? Do you I need a separate grounding rod on/in the garage or are the wires underground (in the trench) from the house okay? Concerned electrician is cutting corners when proper permits, safety, potential hazards are greatest concern. Your help, input, and guidance . . . greatly appreciated. Thank you!
10 answers
  • Chad Curry Homes
    on Dec 9, 2011

    There should be an electrical permit for the work. Is there a master permit for the addition?

  • 3po3
    on Dec 9, 2011

    Brooke, where are you located? Someone might be able to give you a personal recommendation of a reliable, honest electrician. Short of that, you could at least search for an electrician in the search box at the top of the page.

  • One permit for everything. Assuming your doing it all at the same time. if you do one job get it inspected and it passes, you need to pull another permit for the next project. Most permits require an explanation of the work being done. If you only stated interior and service upgrade, then you will need to amend the permit to do the garage. Wires to the garage must be 24 inches if just UF cable. If in plastic pipes PVC 18" deep. The panel in the garage must be grounded as well to a rod. I would be putting in a 220 volt 60 amp service in a garage as a basic size. If I planned on doing some work in the garage I would jump to at least 100 amp. GFCI required in garage. Outside outlet must be GFCI protected. Plus a ton of other requirements that the electrical contractor should be aware of. You need to pull permits. Regardless of who does the work. This is an area you as I think I can tell by the tone of your post that cannot be played around with both for your safety and for the safety of those around you.

  • Brooke
    on Dec 9, 2011

    Thank you for the replies. There is a master permit. There is no mention of the work on to be done on the garage. Denver, CO requires a special/individual electrical permit that was pulled for the electrical work to the addition. My understanding is the City inspector will only inspect what's listed on the permit. So while the work to the garage might be minimal, I've already had an electrical fire in the kitchen thanks to the stellar work of Mr. Electrician, don't want to jeopardize anyone's life, property, ability to get/keep insurance, etc. by cutting corners. Does the garage need it's own grounding rod or is it acceptable to run the wires from the house to the garage underground? Many thanks!

  • LandlightS
    on Dec 9, 2011

    Brooke. Please have your electrician add additions to existing permit, or secure an additional permit for the new work. Is the ditch from the house to the garage at least 18" deep? What size service is going to the garage (amps)? How many circuits are in the garage for the outlets and lighting ? If you are planning any additional electrical usage from the garage ? If so, you may want to consider a minimum 30 or 40 amp service to a sub-panel with 6 - 8 spaces for circuit breakers

  • LandlightS
    on Dec 9, 2011

    Sorry.....if you add the sub-panel you will need a ground rod for that panel. Also, do no cover the ditch until after the rough-in inspection. Most local codes follow the NEC good luck on your project. Have a nice Holiday season Gary

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Dec 9, 2011

    If it is just a minor single circuit being feed to the garage then there is no new "panel" . Panels need grounds. Can you explain what was going on with the fire in the kitchen? was this old work there, or new work that they did.

  • LandlightS
    on Dec 9, 2011

    Brook.....if the inspectors in Colorado and anything like those in Atlanta, and there is any indication of new work not on the permit.....you are taking your chances. Always better safe than sorry. Also, a single circuit for an outdoor outlet (GFCI), security light and indoor lighting is not a good idea.

  • HDK Electrical Enterprises
    on Dec 31, 2011

    Landlights is wrong about the ground rod. A subpanel will have an isolated ground that is run back to the primary panel and connected to it's grounding system. The garage will need to be run with four wires; 2 power conductors, 1 neutral conductor, and the ground wire. It will not have it's own ground rod. If the garage is getting an individual circuit, it should be GFCI protected and still won't have a separate ground rod. The best way to find out about the permitting is to call your local permitting office. They are used to working with homeowners and can answer questions on thier requirements.

  • LandlightS
    on Dec 31, 2011

    Don't know about Virginia, but if you add a remote sub-panel, the inspectors in Fulton County, Cobb County and the Cities of Decatur and Atlanta look for it'sown ground rod. Each locality has their own guidelines along with the NEC

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