How to Build a Herb Spiral Garden


As a urban gardener, I love ideas that help create more growing space, are visually appealing, low maintenance, very do-able and are easily accessible.

The Herb Spiral is a nature-inspired vertical garden design that is highly productive and energy efficient. It allows you to stack plants in a pyramid to maximise space - a practical and attractive solution. It is typically 6.5ft wide in diameter at
A compact herb spiral with stone filled gabion walls.
A compact herb spiral with stone filled gabion walls.
Herb Spiral concept drawing showing side elevation with an optional pond at the bottom.
Herb Spiral concept drawing showing side elevation with an optional pond at the bottom.
Diagram showing location of the optional pond or bog garden at the bottom & dry/wet zones for planting a variety of herbs.
Diagram showing location of the optional pond or bog garden at the bottom & dry/wet zones for planting a variety of herbs.
Gather materials & have ready to build your spiral. Choose long lasting edges such as rocks, bricks or pavers for a permanent structure.
Gather materials & have ready to build your spiral. Choose long lasting edges such as rocks, bricks or pavers for a permanent structure.
Measuring the circle & pond position with a string & stake in the center.
Measuring the circle & pond position with a string & stake in the center.
Gravel base laid & pond put into position. Ready to build the vertical herb spiral structure.
Gravel base laid & pond put into position. Ready to build the vertical herb spiral structure.
Rocks are laid in a spiral design working upwards to the center and the ramp planting areas are filled with rubble, soil and organic matter.
Rocks are laid in a spiral design working upwards to the center and the ramp planting areas are filled with rubble, soil and organic matter.
The height is built up in the center, water added to pond and top layers of compost to plant into go in last and finally mulch.
The height is built up in the center, water added to pond and top layers of compost to plant into go in last and finally mulch.
Seedlings are planted into the herb spiral with sun lovers at the top and shady  characters & water babies at the bottom!
Seedlings are planted into the herb spiral with sun lovers at the top and shady characters & water babies at the bottom!
A square twist on a herb spiral garden. Perfect for corporate courtyards or formal gardens.
A square twist on a herb spiral garden. Perfect for corporate courtyards or formal gardens.
Herb spirals can be planted with a variety of edibles, flowers & perennials as a feature in any compact space.
Herb spirals can be planted with a variety of edibles, flowers & perennials as a feature in any compact space.
Rock wall herb spiral. Perfect design for adding a tall 'thriller' at the top, 'fillers' in the middle and 'spillers' over the edges and in cracks up the walls.
Rock wall herb spiral. Perfect design for adding a tall 'thriller' at the top, 'fillers' in the middle and 'spillers' over the edges and in cracks up the walls.
The Micro Gardener - Anne

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

2 questions
  • Jo
    on Mar 14, 2016

    The spiral garden made from wire as featured in the slide show is beautiful, do you have instructions on how to make that?

  • Son3615523
    on Apr 4, 2016

    How do you keep the soil from all washing down to the bottom of the spiral?

    • Anna
      on Jul 4, 2016

      Hi, neighbor! Don't flood it (like monsoon season), just use the "shower" or "mist" setting on your nozzle attachment thingy. In our area, you'll need to do it daily, I'm guessing. I'm going to build this and hope my advice works! Good luck to you.

    • Son3615523
      on Jul 4, 2016

      Anna, LOL, yep, monsoons could be a problem. So, do I cover it during monsoon season as I obviously can't control that? If you build one and it survives monsoons, I would love to hear about it.

    • Rebecca Patterson Thompson
      on Jul 29, 2016

      You can mulch with rock, including some larger, flatter stones inserted into the soil on their sides crossing the spiral to create check dams against erosion. Once the plants are established, they will help hold the soil in place. The spiral shape should also help slow the water flow.

    • Valerie Fortune
      on Aug 26, 2016

      I would line the area where the soil goes with Gardner cloth and put in spacers in to hold the soil in place. In the same way as a file folder. Keeps the soil .

    • The Micro Gardener - Anne
      on Oct 5, 2016

      I would suggest a heavy interlocking mulch like a coarse bark chip that holds well onto itself. Once your plants establish, their root systems will stabilise the soil. Wire mesh inserted under the mulch at any vulnerable points may be a short term option.

      , A fibrous mulch will also work well as it tends to hold onto itself as a mass rather than individual chips

Join the conversation

4 of 81 comments
  • Gail
    on May 29, 2017

    I love all of garden ideas! Living art.
  • Ret Grant
    on Jul 28, 2017

    Love your ideas. I might also add a rubber liner and some rocks with a pump and have a spiral waterfall fountain with small plants on the side of the water and a catch pool at the bottom.
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