Amy B
Amy B
  • Hometalker
  • Tucker, GA
Asked on Dec 15, 2011

I have rooted some gardenia clippings, how can I keep them alive till spring?

Douglas HuntAmy BMike and Anne
+14

Answered

Also have some sage in a pot outside, what do I need to do with it? And a sprout coming from my ginger root, how do I keep that going as well?
17 answers
  • 3po3
    on Dec 16, 2011

    Not sure about the gardenias and ginger, except to note that gardenias are notoriously picky and difficult to grow, so don't feel bad if they don't make it. As for the sage, can you move it inside to a sunny window herb garden?

  • Amy B
    on Dec 16, 2011

    There are very few window that get the sun and/or a place to put it near the window... I'm worried about shocking it from being outside for months tho.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Dec 18, 2011

    Amy, the odds are definitely against gardenia clippings at this time of year. Spring and summer are much better times to try this. But you will find some pointers in this discussion: http://www.hometalk.com/activity/56134 Sage is pretty tough-I've had it come back from the ground in New York after a winter where temperatures reached 10 below-and I think it might well survive outdoors in a pot if the pot is reasonably sized. Or move the pot to a sheltered location for the worst of the winter. If you want to bring it indoors, start by just bringing it in at night when it is coldest and take it back outside during the day. Doing this for a couple of weeks will help acclimate it. If your ginger is starting to root, transfer it to a pot and lay the rhizome on the top of the soil, then cover with a very small amount of additional soil, like you would for an iris in the garden. Keep the soil moist but not wet, and give it as much light as possible. Good luck!

  • Walter Reeves
    on Dec 18, 2011

    I think you need to buy some plant lights and install them so the tupes are no more than 6" from the plant leaves.

  • Amy B
    on Dec 18, 2011

    Tupes? Which question are we referring to?

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Dec 18, 2011

    probably meant tubes (in the grow lights). What type of sage, how old and how ig is it? I agree, need to keep the Gardenias inside. The Ginger can probably be kept in the garage.

  • Amy B
    on Dec 18, 2011

    Melon sage and has been outside in a pot for months now still alive. Gardenias have rooted in water and are still in water in the house... Ginger is on a whole tuber, can I cut off the other parts to eat and then plant the part with the sprout?

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Dec 19, 2011

    Amy I think your sage is a Salvia elegans, and only hardy through zone 9. If you want to try to keep it, bringing it in will be best for the plant. It has been quite a while since I have grown ginger, so I am hesitant in giving you advise on it.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Dec 19, 2011

    Sorry, Amy, I thought you were referring to culinary sage. Is your ginger in water now? How are you rooting it?

  • Rose S
    on Dec 19, 2011

    Amy, my Ginger stays outside all year long. When it turns brown and looks like a dry cornstalk I cut it back. Come Spring it comes right back. We have had some pretty warm weather, and Tucker isn't that far from Marietta, so maybe covering the sprout with mulch 'might' get it through. But if you have a sprout, you have 'life' and I'm pretty sure that it will come right back next year. Just make sure that it is in plenty of sun.

  • Rose S
    on Dec 19, 2011

    By the way, my Sage stays outside in the ground all year long. Good luck.

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Dec 19, 2011

    What type Sage and Ginger do you have Rose?

  • Amy B
    on Dec 19, 2011

    The ginger is just a sprout from a tuber that I got from the grocery for eating, so don't know if I can just break off that part and put it in dirt, leave it in the window...???

  • Amy B
    on Dec 19, 2011

    Thanks for the answers, but I'm still hoping for more ideas.

  • Mike and Anne
    on Dec 20, 2011

    It is not that difficult to get a rooted gardenia to grow outdoors through the winter in the Raleigh area. Since you started your cutting in water you may want to plant it in soil in a pot and grow it indoors through the winter then plant it outside in April. It is sometimes difficult to get a plant that has formed its roots in water to develop roots that will work well in soil. Growing it indoors for the winter may help it survive.

  • Amy B
    on Dec 20, 2011

    Ok Mike and Anne, I will give it a shot. Do you think I should dip the roots in root growing powder?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Dec 27, 2011

    A root-growing compound is usually used for plants that are difficult to root. I have not tried to do this myself, but from what I've read gardenias don't fall into that camp.

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