Faux Leaded Glass Window


I've always had a fondness for leaded glass windows, but the expense was out of reach. That is until I found a product that let me turn my boring old glass windows into faux stain glass beauties. I simply applied the product directly onto the existing window. And self-adhesive "leading" strips made the process so much easier. The full tutorial can be found on my blog post ...
1. Here's the before.  A faux stain glass window I created using Gallery Glass over a decade ago.  I used a hand steamer and scraper to remove the design.  I'll be honest -- it took some elbow grease.
1. Here's the before. A faux stain glass window I created using Gallery Glass over a decade ago. I used a hand steamer and scraper to remove the design. I'll be honest -- it took some elbow grease.
2. Before I started, I drew out my desired design on a sheet of paper sized to the window.  This served as my template.
2. Before I started, I drew out my desired design on a sheet of paper sized to the window. This served as my template.
3. Then I grabbed my faux stain glass Gallery Glass materials, which included self-adhesive leading strips, liquid leading, and crystal clear "color."
3. Then I grabbed my faux stain glass Gallery Glass materials, which included self-adhesive leading strips, liquid leading, and crystal clear "color."
4. I applied the leading strips first.  They are so easy to work with and can easily be cut, removed, and repositioned.  A level ensured the lines were straight.
4. I applied the leading strips first. They are so easy to work with and can easily be cut, removed, and repositioned. A level ensured the lines were straight.
5. Once the leading lines were in place, I applied the Gallery Glass crystal clear directly onto the glass.  When it dried to clear after 24 hours, it added instant character to my 100+ year old home.
5. Once the leading lines were in place, I applied the Gallery Glass crystal clear directly onto the glass. When it dried to clear after 24 hours, it added instant character to my 100+ year old home.
Linda @ it all started with paint

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

5 questions
  • Kathy
    on Jan 3, 2017

    The window looks like it is more milky now and less see through. Is that just the picture or does it actually come out opaque?

  • Mary Lisa Robinson
    on May 23, 2017

    Can this be washed like a regular glass window?
  • Merry Straub
    on Sep 22, 2018

    LOVE THIS!!! Great job! Could you have just used the tape and not the liquid?

  • Kay McGonigal
    on Oct 17, 2018

    I love the windows! They are perfect with your cabinets! Can you tell me how the paint treatment was done on the cabinets? I would love to do this in my kitchen!

  • Car Ly
    on Feb 25, 2019

    If I wanted to use this on an old school antique glass door that is in between a living space and cold porch, does anyone know if the cold temperatures (e.g. -15 to -20) would wreck the finish or compromise it? Thank you, Carly

Join the conversation

2 of 46 comments
  • Rie Helm
    on May 23, 2017

    I love it! Colored stained glass isn't my thing (we all have different tastes) but I love vintage glass (beveled is awesome too) and the privacy factor! If I wasn't a renter, I'd do this now!
  • Helen Bouslaugh
    on May 23, 2017

    The "real" colored stained glass is not real. It is mentioned she had done the same type of treatment a decade ago. She is tired of it as we all do or we would not be viewing this website. All of us like to update, try new things. I do like the classic best since any color scheme and looks more accurate to the home. Great job!
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