Martha R
Martha R
  • Hometalker
  • Raleigh, NC
Asked on Jan 1, 2012

How dry should the soil be around a philodendrum. Mine is in a container and leaves grow but eventually yellow.

Reb1658751Faidra at  CA Global IncMartha R
+7

Answered

It is in a container that was made by a florist so no drainage. Right now the soil is moist but not overly wet. Have it in a room getting indirect light. Any ideas would be helpful.
Thanks.
10 answers
  • Walter Reeves
    on Jan 1, 2012

    "Moist but not overly wet" sounds about right. The main limiting factor is probably light. Move it closer to a window or provide a grow-light no more than 12 inches from the leaves.

  • Martha R
    on Jan 1, 2012

    thanks, i will try and move it.

  • Martha R
    on Jan 1, 2012

    Can it tolerate some direct sunlight?

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Jan 1, 2012

    It concerns me that their is no drainage in your pot. How are you keeping it moist but not overly wet? How long has it been in your current pot? How big is it in comparison to the pot? I think I would re pot it into a pot with some drainage and appropriate to the size of the plant. I suggest that you use fresh soil . I am suspicious that you may have some salt build up in your soil and possible some fungus type issues with no drainage. Have you noticed any fungus flies or fruit flies around the soil area?

  • Mike and Anne
    on Jan 1, 2012

    It is possible to grow Philodendron in a container without drainage but it takes very careful watering. Some people have grown them for a year or so in water and occasional fertilizer. Soil that may feel moist to the touch at the top of the container may be soaking wet at the bottom. That will damage roots and produce yellowed leaves. The plant may need more light - and at a window with morning, not afternoon light. If it were my plant I would take it out of the pot to check the root system. If the roots seem wet or damaged you can pot it in a container with a drainage hole in the bottom or put it in the same container but add some gravel at the bottom of the container to improve soil drainage.

  • Martha R
    on Jan 1, 2012

    Thanks for all the helpful ideas. I will implement and see if I can get better results.

  • David S
    on Jan 2, 2012

    I'VE GOT A PHILODENDRON IN A CONTAINER [ STORE BOUGHT ] WITH DRAINAGE . IT'S LOCATED WITH 2 OTHER PLANTS ON A LEDGE IN MY BATHROOM WITH LIGHT FROM A LARGE TRANSLUCENT WINDOW . EACH WEEK , AT WATERING TIME , I CHECK THE SOIL .MAN .....IN PAST YEARS I HAD A BAD HABIT OF OVER WATERING A NUMBER OF PLANTS . I GUESS I'M A SLOW LEARNER !

  • Martha R
    on Jan 2, 2012

    Part of my problem is that this plant is in a huge decorative pot that was originally for my office. It is a beautiful pot but too heavy to move easily. I bought some wheels that help it to roll. I have moved it closer to indirect light and plan to try and replant as Anne suggested with some rocks at the bottom of the pot. Any other ideas would help. I am excited about this forum. Very helpful.

  • Faidra at CA Global Inc
    on Jan 9, 2012

    Martha I have them, and they're great plants, the leaves do yellow and turn brown, but if more leaves are coming out don't worry about it. I leave them out on my deck and front patio in the spring summer, then bring in the fall winter. I have them in front of windows and turn once a week as they grow towards the light. If you transplant because of no opening in bottom, please use a really large pot at least the same size as original as that is what it is use to and may go into shock. I've had one for around five years and once I take it back outside I cut it back old dried foliage and some of the really heavy leaves to keep it from sagging. Have a friend that has had one for years and it has filled her entire picture window 10 x 12 area, she has spikes holding up stems everywhere and it's in a HUGE pot. Pretty amazing to look at, it's what made me buy one! Good luck, yes as put rocks or pine cones in bottom of pots.

  • Reb1658751
    on Jun 18, 2015

    Most of mine are starters in glass jars,with water,then transplanted to mix of potting soil ...they do yellow occasionally,so I just take the yellow leaves off. Mine are inside right now,haven't moved outdoors yet,but water about twice weekly if needed..they are really long & full...you can't kill them,they are very tolerant.

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