Mayo
Mayo
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  • Mokena, IL
Asked on Mar 25, 2013

WHY is there a post on how to trap and kill bees???

Deborah MoreyMayoDee
+14

Answered

We're losing our much-needed bees (pollinators of so many of our foods because of pesticides and Colony Collapse Disorder) and today (March25, 2013) I was greeted with a way to trap and kill bees. PLEASE REMOVE THIS RIGHT AWAY.
17 answers
  • Mary Insana
    on Mar 25, 2013

    I agree, If the bees have invaded your home you can have a beekeeper come in and take the nest and rescue most of the bees for relocation.

  • Mayo
    on Mar 25, 2013

    Good solution. Much better than wanton killing of any "pest". Many of those we kill or have exterminators kill are beneficial insects that would kill the insects we don't want if we'd give them a chance.

  • Elyse
    on Mar 25, 2013

    unless, as is my case, you have a bee keeper that lives right next door to you who stores his bees literally 4 feet from your bedroom window & they invade your house through the attic & sting you while in bed or watching tv. & said bee keeper refuses to move the hives & the city doesn't do anything about your complaints..in that case, im thinking knowing how to kill them is a good thing :)

  • Mayo
    on Mar 25, 2013

    That's not a very bright beekeeper. He wants his bees to produce honey - or should. If you let him know you have a new way to kill any of his bees that come into your living space, he may decide to move them. You can gently ask him if that will eat into his honey supply. : ) I try to be kind to unkind people. They need it the most.

  • Becky (J) P
    on Mar 26, 2013

    we had carpenter bees in our deck. I did kill them. They can totally destroy anything that is wood you have. I think you are thinking of bumblebees possibly?

  • Mayo
    on Mar 26, 2013

    Honeybees and bumblebees pollinate plants. They live in "families" and are beneficial. They die if they sting, so try not to sting unless in danger. Carpenter bees are solitary bees, have the ability to drill through wood, and can sting many times. It's best to find a beekeeper or expert to get rid of any "bees" you have.

  • Jeanine Wester
    on Mar 27, 2013

    Hi @Mayo saw you're from Mokena, I'm in Peoria. Not TOO far lol! I like the point you bring up. I would be really worried to have bees near my young kid though, is it expensive to have a professional come in to move them? (instead of killing)

  • Mayo
    on Mar 27, 2013

    Most beekeepers will at least come and look at the bees you have. If they're honeybees they may want them for themselves - to have another hive. From that point, they'd tell you what they recommend, and probably who to contact. This way, if the bees are beneficial, they won't be needlessly killed.

  • Mayo
    on Mar 27, 2013

    Oh - and no - we're not all that far from each other.

  • Jeanine Wester
    on Mar 27, 2013

    Well, if I ever have this problem I'll look into local beekeepers. It does make me sad that the populations are dwindling. I'm interested to know if Peoria has any beekeepers, probably!

  • Jeanette S
    on Mar 27, 2013

    I adore bees...not the carpenter kind...and my dad was a beekeeper. So they do not scare me and we have no allergies. Once bees came into the den through the attic and the opening for the ceiling fan. There was a swarm of them on the back of my house so the local beekeeper came and with protective gear, climbed a step ladder, took a piece of cardboard and raked them into a small box and carted them away...he was thrilled because he had an instant hive. The queen is in the middle of that clump! First thing is have a bee keeper come over and check your house...bees do not come inside unless there is a colony looking for a place to set up an apartment! And If I had hives near my property and they were entering my house, I would make sure I had one of those pens used to stop bee allergies in every room. But keep in mind someone can die before they get to the pen! I would then contact an attorney and advise this man of the danger he is posing by putting his bee hives too close to the property of others. I would love to have bees but would not even consider it unless I had acres and acres. If all failed, I would go to court to seek an injunction. You do not need an attorney to do this! Bees inside your home is not safe!

  • Mayo
    on Mar 27, 2013

    When we kept bees we were also thrilled to get a call to get a swarm. At one point we put a ladder up a tall pine and got one. Whatever works!

  • Mayo
    on Mar 27, 2013

    This is for Jeannette - here's a link to help you find beekeepers near you. http://www.ilsba.com/affiliate-associations.html

  • Mayo
    on Mar 27, 2013

    I meant for Jeanine - sorry...

  • Dee
    on Jul 14, 2014

    For the second summer, we have an infestation of yellow-jackets. They are aggressive, and I was just stung today. Honey bees, mason bees, and other pollinators-I'll let them be. But sorry, I have a highly allergic husband, and pets, so these guys have to go. Some bees have to be removed, not just relocated.

  • Mayo
    on Jul 14, 2014

    When you say removed, not just 'relocated' do you mean killed? I hope you're talking about yellow jackets, which are NOT bees, but rather predatory wasps. And, if you are getting someone or something to spray them, please make sure they target just the yellow jackets. Errant spray can kill the 'good guys".

  • Deborah Morey
    on Mar 31, 2016

    Carpenter Bees are not pollenators. They will destroy anything wood by boring large holes to lay their eggs. These holes are actually a series of tunnels and your wood trim, carport, decks, porches and sheds will be ruined. These bees leave after laying their eggs but will return year after year to lay again, as well as the ones that hatch there. You may start with 2 or 3 and in a few years have a swarm visiting and drilling thumb size holes in everything. They are best killed to prevent return. We have even had them drill holes in the subfloor of our mobile home, so trust me, you want to kill them!

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