Gene
Gene
  • Hometalker
  • Lawrenceville, GA
Asked on Jan 5, 2012

We have hardwood floors. Before we moved in 10 yrs. ago we had them refinished.

Dustless Wood Floor RefinishingBuilders Floor Covering, Inc.KMS Woodworks
+16

Answered

Now, where we sit, at the table and at the computer, the finish is looking dull. What can we do other than completely refinshing again?
19 answers
  • KMS Woodworks
    on Jan 5, 2012

    If the damage is not "into" the wood but merely with the "finish" a screen and re-coat is a quick fix. This process does not produce the full amounts of dust that a "sand to bare wood" refinish does. If the finish is worn into the wood and the wood grain is darkened or soiled you will need a full sand.

    q we have hardwood floors before we moved in 10 yrs ago we had them refinished, flooring, hardwood floors, This tiger wood area was just screened and re coated the kitchen in the back was a full sand stain jobq we have hardwood floors before we moved in 10 yrs ago we had them refinished, flooring, hardwood floors, This level of damage needs a full sand
  • Gene
    on Jan 5, 2012

    KMS - Would I have to do the entire floor or could I just do the worn spots>

  • The answer depends what kind of finish you have on it now

  • In other words is it oil based poly, water based poly or acrylic, or a rubbing oil

  • Gene
    on Jan 5, 2012

    It is oil base poly.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Jan 6, 2012

    Spot finishes only look good when working with penetrating oils...a Surface finish like oil poly the whole room should be screened/ finished. Check out this article I wrote on floor finishes. http://www.networx.com/article/exotic-wood-floor-finishes-you-havent-s

  • I would touch up the worn spot, then screen the whole room and topcoat it all then

  • Moda Floors and Interiors
    on Jan 9, 2012

    I agree a screen and coat would do the trick to restore the worn areas. It has been my experience doing only small areas can show the difference between the existing and newly coated areas, therefore I would suggest doing the whole room!

  • Mike N
    on Jan 9, 2012

    I advise my clients that a whole room refinish will yield the most satisfactory result. In fact, I rarely agree to do anything else because even after I've warned clients in the past that consistency throughout cannot be guaranteed, and they've agreed and understand up-front, they are more often than not dissatisfied with the result. Even when the result is virtually unnoticeable. I feel like I'm doing more of a disservice to my clients by "saving" them money up front when it's likely that the final product won't meet their expectations, regardless of how well I explain the process. If no floor transitions between rooms are present (thresholds between rooms) which would help reduce the amount of floor finishing needed, I would suggest doing yourself a favor and just re-do the entire room. As long as the room isn't gigantic the cost difference should be negligible. (Floor sand/screen & finish should cost no more than $5 psf.)

  • Gene
    on Jan 9, 2012

    My problem(s) with doing the entire 'room' is that it would involve the kitchen, breakfast area, dinning room, entrance foyer and hallway. And a lot of furniture and 'stuff' to move and a lot to cover to keep the dust off.

  • Barbara
    on Jan 9, 2012

    Is screening the same as sanding? My floors was just sanded a year ago and I use that Bona stuff and they are still dull. Why, what am I doing wrong.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Jan 10, 2012

    Screening is the "diet" version of a floor refinish process. The top of the existing finish in merely "roughed up" by a fine grit "screen" (the screen resembles a silicon carbide "dry wall" screen but is big and round to fit a floor buff). This mechanical abrasion allows a new top coat of finish to bind better. Sanding is where the old finish is sanded away all to way down to bare wood...and this process is dusty...the screening is very "tame" in the dust dept.. Screening only really works if the existing finish is only dull or slightly damaged...if the wear in down to the wood a screening will not fix it and the soiling or dirt is "sealed in". Also since screening is a light process any cupping or crowning of the wood is not corrected.

  • Sheila B
    on Jan 24, 2012

    When refinishing, is oil or water better?

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Jan 25, 2012

    Oil is the only way in my book...it brings a lot more life and color to the party. These two pics show a before and after...the owner had installed rustic white oak and finished it with a basic water based product...this was a simple and basic job 1 or 2 coats. In less than a year I was brought in to "fix" it as the water base was failing in many areas. I completely sanded the floor and then applied 3 coats of an oil based poly as you can see from the after pics the floor looks like rustic white oak should.

    q we have hardwood floors before we moved in 10 yrs ago we had them refinished, flooring, hardwood floors, crappy water based finishq we have hardwood floors before we moved in 10 yrs ago we had them refinished, flooring, hardwood floors, rich warm looking oil based finish
  • Barbara
    on Jan 26, 2012

    I guess I will have to have you come redo mine sometime in the future! Love it.

  • Sheila B
    on Jan 26, 2012

    Thanks KMS. I was told water was more "organic" or "green" and so I was just wondering which was really best. I love the way the floors in the picture turned out. Also, do you prefer wood from the US or is there any imported that you like better? What about if you were putting down a floor that was prefinished? what are your thought on a prefinished floore?

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Jan 27, 2012

    There are some oil based finishes that are "greener" than others...this has to do with VOC's and such. Some of the catalyzed finishes (Glitza) can be darn right nasty and require the use of organic respirators. A locally produced domestic floor is very green in the sense that it is local. As far as domestic floor / exotic goes its a mixed bag. A good number of the exotics are much harder in their Janka hardness ratings and offer colors not found in your basic oaks and maples. As a wood worker and flooring guy I love working with cherry, one of my favorites. When I remodeled my home I installed about 600 sq ft of Jatoba (Brazilian Cherry) in my master bed room. I used a sand in place product and finished it with linseed oil...a green penetrating finish. Personally I prefer the sand in place floors as the little groove between boards (in prefinished) is distracting to me. Check out this article I wrote on floor finish types. http://www.networx.com/article/exotic-wood-floor-finishes-you-havent-s

    q we have hardwood floors before we moved in 10 yrs ago we had them refinished, flooring, hardwood floors, Jatoba hardwood flooring with linseed oil finishq we have hardwood floors before we moved in 10 yrs ago we had them refinished, flooring, hardwood floors, Jatoba install
  • Some times you can get away with just a buff and coat. I would try that first.

  • You need a Screen & Recoat, Buff the floor with a 120 grit screen and then apply two coats of finish. This will prep the floor so the finish will bond and restores the gloss.

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