Jerrod W
Jerrod W
  • Hometalker
  • Snellville, GA
Asked on Jan 20, 2012

Can I be too good for my own good

Peace Painting Co., Inc.Gregg BRicardo B
+8

Answered

Honesty, Integrity... where has that gone in this industry? Was it ever here to begin with..
11 answers
  • There may no honesty and integrity in the world these days but who ever has it is in business for ever!!!

  • Ricardo B
    on Jan 20, 2012

    Jerrod... I say let your honesty, integrity and concern for the client/customer shine. That's your mark that you'll leave when you walk away from every project you do. They WILL notice quality and good service and they'll brag to their fellow neighbors and friends about the work they had done by that special guy. Who knows of anyone giving word-of-mouth recommendations about a guy that left them in a lurch on a project. Even if you don't get additional work from what you did... you know that you did it right because it was the right thing to do. Oh... always leave not just one calling card with your customers... leave a handful and tell them to feel free to give them out if they liked your work... that would be a superior touch that shoddy workmen can't touch.

  • Teresa M
    on Jan 20, 2012

    I think those thoughts are in a lot of people's minds in most industries. There are impacts to keeping yourself above reproach, but at the end of the day you can look in the mirror and respect yourself.

  • I have had a good number of return clients or referrals due to my personal honesty, integrity and dedication to doing a quality job. Those who don't have it will be asking those who do if they have any work available.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Jan 20, 2012

    Temptations to make a quick buck appear good. Take the long term approach; getting started is the hardest part. CP

  • SawHorse.net
    on Jan 22, 2012

    You have to have integrity to survive in this economy. Either that or deep pockets to pay for new clients.

  • Donna McCrummen
    on Jan 22, 2012

    I personally need honesty and integrity to sleep at night.

  • I joined the National Association of the Remodeling Industry years ago in order to associate with ethical remodelers and to learn to learn from some of the best remodelers in the profession. I am grateful for the example that my associates have demonstrated and pity homeowners who can't tell professional remodelers from the pretenders as they judge remodelers by the price of their bid.

  • Ricardo B
    on Jan 24, 2012

    Well, I'm persuaded that at every opportunity, the contractor, his/her employees, the actual workers are SALES PEOPLE whether they realize it or not. It's up to them to sell the non-knowledgeable homeowner on HOW to select a dependable and conscientious business partner for their project. Sometimes their good efforts confirm the initial sales job of securing the job and it's their commitment that keeps the client/homeowner from having "buyers remorse" Something as simple as having the homeowner always ask for references, licenses, longevity of their work activity and showing any bonding certificates required for that may apply. The homeowner should never just roll over and give the business to the first contractor that responds. Homeowners have their own responsibility to be thorough and ask LOTs of questions.

  • Gregg B
    on Feb 1, 2012

    I subscribe to the 10/10,000 rule.........if you do something right, 10 people will hear about it.......if you do something wrong, 10,000 people will know about it very soon......the other adage is.....if you are honest, you don't have to remember what you said......we build our homes on a foundation of honesty and integrity.....

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 1, 2012

    Gregg, that reminds me of a saying I have , "It can take a year to build a house and one hour to burn it down." CP

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