J S
J S
  • Hometalker
  • Austin, TX
Asked on Jan 31, 2012

Trying to paint a wood dresser black with latex - using a foam roller which is making the surface "pimply"...

Home improvement specialtiesPeace Painting Co., Inc.KMS Woodworks
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Answered

and I did prime with Kilz. I sanded with 220 grit but it turned the black grayish - I've painted a lot of wood furniture, but always white latex or colored spray paint. Seems I'm having trouble with black latex. Am I using too low a grit? I feel like the roller is causing the textural problems.
17 answers
  • SawHorse.net
    on Feb 1, 2012

    Did you use a tack cloth to get all of the excess dust off?

  • J S
    on Feb 1, 2012

    Yep.

  • Ricardo B
    on Feb 1, 2012

    Maybe it's not dust or debris? After you mix the black latex paint... let it rest to reduce the amount of teeny-tiny bubbles. Also, if you push and pull your foam roller too vigorously, you're probably getting bubbles onto you work there too.

  • J S
    on Feb 1, 2012

    Huh, hadn't thought of that. Thanks, will keep that in mind.

  • J S
    on Feb 1, 2012

    Some more thoughts - the "bubbles" are of a uniform consistency. It's not here and there, like dust particles. That is why I assumed it was the roller. Fwiw.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 1, 2012

    It's that roller and that paint. The paint is drying before it can level out. This is what happens with latex paints. If you were using oil paint, this would not happen. So, you can try to switch to another, perhaps higher quality latex, or just go to oil. Unfortunately, no latex will level smooth like the oils do. If you don't want to use oil, try using a flock-foam roller which holds more paint. You will be doing less rolling over the same area which is what latex rough looking, because of it's quick drying time it begins to pick up a stipple. Sher-Will has a good latex called Pro-Classic. If you need more drying time, you can add some 'extender' that they sell. This is a good option. Best, Charles

  • I agree with Peace. Since I work only with latex paint, here are the steps I use. . . the quality of the paint and your tools IS critical. Add some extender to your paint to help it stay wet even longer. That will help it to level. I use a low nap mohair roller SLOWLY. If there is still the stipple effect, drag a GOOD brush (like a Purdy) through it very lightly. Let that brush just lay in your hand like a feather allowing only the pressure from the weight of the brush touch the surface. When it is completely dry, do a light sanding with very fine sand paper. It will appear somewhat grey. Wipe it with a damp rag to remove the dust. When you apply your topcoat, that will go away. A good over the counter topcoat is Stays Clear by Ben Moore. If you want the high gloss lacquer look, it may take several coats. Be sure to lightly sand in between. Good luck

  • J S
    on Feb 1, 2012

    Thanks, that's very useful. I had added floetrol to the paint, do you think I didn't add enough? What grit should I use to sand? I typically use minwax polycyclic.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Feb 1, 2012

    I avoid the foam roller and use the mini "fuzzy" ones, I believe they are nylon. I cut in with a small brush then roll the flat surfaces like in these doors.

    q trying to paint a wood dresser black with latex using a foam roller which is making, painted furniture, brush and roll
  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 1, 2012

    You were on the right track with Floetrol, only the XIM extender seems to work a little better. 220 grit is fine and Polycrylic works well. CP

  • J S
    on Feb 2, 2012

    And now I have resolved, after this project, never to use black latex paint ever again. WTS - that trick with the brush seemed to help a lot. Haven't top coated yet, but will try it tomorrow. My local hardware store guy corroborated on a lot of what Charles said. Thanks to all who responded, I appreciate your help.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 4, 2012

    The issue is not with the paint color but type/brand.

  • J S
    on Feb 4, 2012

    It is valspar. Pretty crummy? I've heard latex in general tends to behave like that. How is Martin Senour? Do you know much about that brand?

  • My experience is that Sherwin Williams and Ben Moore level the best.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Feb 4, 2012

    One of the few times I have used a "foam" roller was when applying a "granite" texture paint. This was a dutch boy product the the foam roller helped enhance the sandy grain of this textured paint. I would put part of this on the roller and not just the paint.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 4, 2012

    Especially when working with tricky latex, both roller and paint need to be the best selection. Though it appears that way, all paints are not created equal and, more so than usual, there is a direct relationship between price and quality. With all the choices we have, go to paint store for paint. There whole existence is devoted to that one thing. Martin Senour is okay, just not quite to the level that say, Sherwin Williams is, and they are owned by SW, so why not go to the source if you can, for more options. There are few MS stores left around here. What you are trying to do is not too easy, so way to go, you'll get better and have a great product with some experience. Best, Charles

  • JS, I keep a gallon of Floetrol on hand (paint conditioner) for using with latex on furniture and trim. It leaves a streakless finish and hardens up nicely. Using a foam roller and brush with it should give you a nice finish, but I'd try dry-brushing it on (very little paint, spread very well overlapping consistently) two coats in opposite directions, then one rolled topcoat with a thinner paint and Floetrol. I only use Behr paint...it's very high quality, latex.

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