Vicki T
Vicki T
  • Hometalker
  • Casper, WY
Asked on Feb 9, 2012

Plumber, Electrician or Building Contractor?

Glkirk Builders Inc.Hewitt Remodeling Services LLCJeff C
+5

Answered

Because I have a large closet in my main floor bathroom I would like to use it for a stackable washer/dryer. I do have a laundry room directly beneath this area but can not handle the stairs like I used to. All the plumbing for the three bathrooms, kitchen and laundry run along the same wall. Who should I call first to get this plan put into action?
8 answers
  • 3po3
    on Feb 9, 2012

    Here's a general contractor where you might start: http://www.hometalk.com/member/d615hacr8z They can at least give you an estimate and tell you what is going to be involved. If you aren't comfortable with them doing the whole job, you could take if from there and find individual plumbing and electric contractors.

  • I agree with Steve, A general contractor. They will have the resources available to get this done.

  • A smaller local contractor should be able to handle this just fine. How old is the house? Get a few bids and check references. Be cautious with contractors who mostly have experience with new construction....that's a completely different animal.

  • Vicki T
    on Feb 10, 2012

    Steve have you dealt with this contractor before or know of someone who can recommend them? The house is a late 70's build with very basic straight lines. Basement is the same size square footage as the main level. I will contact abc construction and see what they say. Thanks everyone for getting me going in the right direction. Hopefully I will have a before and after picture to share in the near future.

  • 3po3
    on Feb 10, 2012

    I have not worked with this contractor. I just found him searching on Hometalk for your area. As Andy said, you should probably get a few estimates, so this is just one place to start.

  • Jeff C
    on Feb 10, 2012

    Hey Vicki, if you can find the latest issue of Holmes Magazine which is also their last issue under Dauphin Media Group, they have an entire spread on Compact Laundry rooms. I'm sure there is some information within that article that would help aid you in your decision and your talks with contractors to do the job. Here is what the magazine will look like http://holmesmagazine.com/

  • Vicki, As usual, excellent inputs thus far. All I want to do is amplify their great answers. Remodeling is much different than new construction. In new construction, the builder starts with piles of materials and can control what is built. Remodelers have to work with what someone else has put together and the passage of time. Simply put, it requires a different temperment and experience in remodeling is important unless you are okay with someone learning on the job. As far as who or what, you need someone that has the experience taking several working pieces of the puzzle and place them in the proper position, in the right order, in a timely and efficient manner. That requires knowledge of the different pieces and their impact on each other. That is a remodeling general contractor's primary job. That is not to say that a "specialist" (i.e.: electrician, plumber, etc..) cannot do it... But if I am looking for someone to care for the overall health of my family, I find an experienced family doctor who has the experience to manage the overall picture.... as good as that cardiac surgeon might be at cracking a chest and fixing my heart, he is not the most capable managing the big picture. Tim

  • Glkirk Builders Inc.
    on Feb 10, 2012

    A plumber is who you should call first. He can do some demo and will know enough about framing and electrical to get the ball rolling. He will probably know about clearances. Then call an electrician. Wires can go around pipes, but pipes can't go around wires. Then you will need an HVAC man to run your ductwork. All these entities require a seperate permit and inspection. If structure gets comprimised, then a general contractor, building permit and inspection will be needed. Word of caution; don't pay anybody until the inspection passes. Then call a plasterer/drywall finisher and or a carpenter to patch up the holes. Make sure the insulation is replaced if removed. Simple huh :)

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