Louise
Louise
  • Hometalker
Asked on Feb 10, 2012

For the past two yrs my jonquils (maybe they're daffodils - I don't know the difference) have come up but had no blooms.

Gabrielle FalkDouglas HuntLouise
+4

Answered

In Nov & even Dec., I dug up a bunch of them, thinking I'd found them all, and transplanted them, adding bulb starter and E. B. Stone's Sure Start. Those are coming up but so far I can't tell if they're going to bloom. But I found out, also, that I didn't dig up all of my old ones, and they're also up but only one has signs of blooming. I know I'm not supposed to dig up the old ones now to transplant, but since they're not going to bloom this yr anyway, will it hurt them to dig them up now and relocate them, adding Sure Start, etc., to the hole? Would they all do well next yr?
6 answers
  • Walter Reeves
    on Feb 10, 2012

    It won't hurt to transplant IF you get a big clump of dirt around the bulbs. But my preference is to wait until the leaves have turned yellow in May and move them then. Either way, fertilize now to push more leaves onto the plants so they absorb more sunshine.

  • Louise
    on Feb 10, 2012

    OK, I'll wait until May. The weather will be nicer to be outside, anyway. Will the E.B. Stone Sure Start be OK to use now? Sprinkle around them and water?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Feb 11, 2012

    I'm not sure what the makeup of that fertilizer is, Louise. Brent Heath of Brent and Becky's Bulbs recommends one with a little bit of nitrogen, a fair amount of phosphorus and a lot of potassium, because potassium builds strong roots and a bulb is essentially one big root.

  • Louise
    on Feb 11, 2012

    Thanks for the info. I have no idea of the makeup but will check it out and get another kind if it doesn't measure up. I rely a LOT on the advice of others for gardening, so appreciate input.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Feb 12, 2012

    You're welcome, Louise. Sharing information and inspiration is what Hometalk is all about.

  • Gabrielle Falk
    on Aug 11, 2015

    I've read

    • Gabrielle Falk
      on Aug 11, 2015

      I leave my jonquil flowers to die right down. Looks a bit scrappy but those dead and dying stems and flowers actually provide nutrients for the plant for the next flowering season. I just leave them in the ground. Gabrielle from Sydney @Gabrielle Falk

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