Terri J
Terri J
  • Hometalker
  • Annapolis, MD
Asked on Feb 20, 2012

I have two old wood & glass end tables. The wood has some kind of finish on it. Can I paint with acrylic paints ri

Mary M. PrinzavalliTerri JTherese C
+15

Answered

on top of the wood, or do I have to remove whatever finish is on it first? If so, what would be the best thing to use to remove the finish?
18 answers
  • 3po3
    on Feb 20, 2012

    It would be best to strip the finish first, but you might get the paint to stick and look OK if you just sand the tables down a little bit to get a nice surface for the new paint to adhere to.

  • Terri J
    on Feb 20, 2012

    Thanks for the answers, but I'm still hoping for more ideas. To be more specific, what would be the best thing to buy if I do decide to strip it first?

  • 3po3
    on Feb 20, 2012

    I have had good luck with Citristrip. It works on a lot of surfaces and a lot of finishes. It's still a lot of work, but it's healthier than some of the alternatives and works really nicely: http://www.wmbarr.com/citristrip/default.aspx

    q i have two old wood amp glass end tables the wood has some kind of finish on it, painted furniture
  • Dixie N
    on Feb 20, 2012

    I used CITRISTRIP a few times and it worked great on stained surfaces, but did not touch painted surfaces even after several applications. I was told because it was a natural stripper and not a hazardous type one. When I moved to a strong one the paint came right off. I think it is going to depend on the surface.

  • Terri, Have you tried ASCP? You don;t need to do all that stripping and messy work .This is simple and will transform your table. See this blog I've been following about this paint - http://hueology.blogspot.com/2011/10/31-days-of-ascp-day-28holiday-gifts.html And also see what our Annie Sloan experts here on Hometalk are talking about - http://www.hometalk.com/?filter=Annie+sloan&search=posts

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 20, 2012

    To go on top of your existing finish, you only need to dull and clean it. Then prime it, just to make sure you don't have a problem later. Stripping is only necessary if it is peeling off everywhere or you want to stain the wood. CP

  • The Sloan paints get alot of press here on Hometalk with great results. I don't think you'll need to strip it at all....

  • Terri J
    on Feb 24, 2012

    It's Friday night , I was just sitting on the floor seeing if any of my old painting talents are still alive. With new brushes that I hope to get tomorrow, and reviewing how to mix acrylics, I think I will be ok. Not perfect, but passible for my needs.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 24, 2012

    Terri, keep your new brushes cleaned out well. When you wash them, get all the 'milky trails' out so they stay like new. CP

  • Terri J
    on Feb 25, 2012

    Will do. It's just that these particular brushes are about 20 years old and I think it would just be easier to get some new ones than try to make sure I don't have any little lost strands in the paint to remove as I did during my practice.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 25, 2012

    No doubt! Purdys are good ones, they hold alot of paint', and we like to use more, paint, use more paint and use more paint. (:

  • Terri J
    on Feb 25, 2012

    lol - is does that possibly have anything to do w/ the name of your company and wha you do?

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 27, 2012

    hehe, Allow me to elaborate. Without fail, when I begin to work with someone new, they don't keep enough paint on their brush. So I say the three most important things about brushing are use more paint, 3X. Then I show them with each dip, how to load up their paint brush to the point of dripping and apply it as heavily as possible, up to the point of running or sagging. This technique uses more paint but looks so much nicer as the paint flows out and levels more smoothly, especially with a nice brush. (: Best, Charles

  • Terri J
    on Feb 27, 2012

    Reading back over posts and wondering if anyone else notices when I am wearing my glasses or not to see how many typo's I make. Now, to find my glasses again... Thanks Charles for the tip.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Feb 27, 2012

    Sure Terry, I hope it helps some.

  • Therese C
    on Jun 6, 2012

    Terri I just redid my glass and wood tables using Premium Decor High Gloss waterborne acrylic enamel. I roughed the finish with sandpaper then painted. They came out beautifully..no need to strip the wood.

  • Terri J
    on Jun 6, 2012

    Tables are pretty much stripped alredy - I have ordered some samples from Sabby Dasze to practice with CeCe Caldwell chalk paint on them. Thankis for your tip anyway, and I will remember it in the future!

  • Mary M. Prinzavalli
    on Jun 7, 2015

    I used a product that you paint on first and it will make the paint stick to any surface. I do not remember what it is called but I think I got it from a lumber co. or Sherwin Williams. After applying that I used a very tough paint(like paint they use on cabinets and does not chip easly ) which I get from Sherwin Williams. I used both on an old antiques wardrobe. Mary P. st. louis, Mo.

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