Bernice H
Bernice H
  • Hometalker
  • Woodburn, OR
Asked on Feb 26, 2012

Wheel barrow planter? How do I do it?

Valerie CarriggJeanne SpradlinBernice H
+16

Answered

My hubs has an old metal wheelbarrow that I want to rescue before he gets in an accident with it. Any ideas to make it a planter? I am thinking hostas AND heuchera and alyssum? How do I prepare the barrow? How much can I put in there? Thanks.
11 answers
  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Feb 26, 2012

    What a fun project Bernice:). Does it still have the wheel on it? Drill a few drainage holes in the bottom of it and put some really good soil that will drain well. I don't suggest that you add rocks to the bottom. If you are placing it in the shade your ideas of Hosta's and Heuchera is great. You will need to pay attention to the Hosta and divide it out when it gets too big. I think it would be neat to add something to drape over the edges like variegated small leaf ivy, and some impatiens for added color, or even a big black elephant ear for some drama! I can't wait to see the pictures of your finished project.

  • Bernice H
    on Feb 26, 2012

    Thanks..hmm I WOULD have put rocks in, why do you say no? How about soil coming out of the drainage holes? Yes it still has the wheel, it is rusted a bit also. I have lots of hostas ready for dividing, they are my faves. Seems I cant do much to harm them. Oh, and I just remembered, I do well with New Guinea Impatiens too. Alyssum grows so fast in my little garden, it fills in every nook and cranny. but I love violas too. So how much can this baby hold without being too crowded?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Feb 26, 2012

    Benice, you could put a layer of window screening in the bottom so the soil doesn't come out the holes. If there's a fair amount of rust you might want to invest in a can of Rustoleum spray paint. One of the factors for how many plants to include is how often you want to change out the plants. As you know, hostas, for example, come in a wide variety of sizes, and some of them would probably fill a wheelbarrow themselves. Annuals can be spaced just as you would in a normal container or bed.

  • Deborah C
    on Feb 26, 2012

    I done a wheelbarrow planting a long time back. I wish I had hometalk back then, it would have turned out better!

  • Walter Reeves
    on Feb 26, 2012

    I have a wheelbarrow planter is almost full sun. I put various succulents in it so I didn't have to worry much about watering in summer.

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Feb 26, 2012

    Bernice~ this link gives an understandable reasoning for not adding gravel the bottom of pots. They other reason is, that often times the gravel will gravitate towards your drainage holes and block them off. http://www.dannylipford.com/garden-myth-putting-gravel-in-pots-and-containers/

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Feb 26, 2012

    Oh and yes I think NG Imps are a fabulous idea!

  • Bernice H
    on Mar 2, 2012

    Thanks 4 seasons...good to know. I have used coffee filters, also used gravel, so in future I will stick with filters or screen.

    • Anita Gian
      on Mar 5, 2015

      @Bernice H Good luck, Hostas in the wheelbarrow will be even easier to divide!

  • Jeanne Spradlin
    on Mar 9, 2015

    I painted a wheelbarrow that my grandson rescued from his neighbors trash last year. I sanded everything down and then drilled 3 holes near the bottom edge then lined the bottom with a piece of black landscape fabric that I had leftover from my flower tower project. It took a whole bag of potting soil (the huge bag of miracle grow potting soil from Sam's club) to fill mine. After I had planted mine with flowers I added a layer of mulch because my dad had warned me that everyone that he had seen use a wheelbarrow as a lantern had problems with them getting too dry during our summers. I had mostly annuals in mine last year. https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=E437D84E07F16D74!5971

    • Ada
      on Jun 2, 2015

      @Jeanne Spradlin i love your wheelbarrow !!..i will make my, as you did yours !!!...thank you !!

  • Valerie Carrigg
    on May 11, 2016

    I just helped my neighbor put one together with an old dilapidated wheel barrow she had that was not usable. First I leveled it by raising the handle end of the tub would be level with the front after placing it on a large multilayer of black weed fabric. Next, I filled it with potting soil and planting a Stella d Or daylily with a round stepping stone used to lift a two-story bird house off the soil to prevent wood rot. I then used very small flat river stones a stepping stones. I added some sedum plants and then some small figurines like gnomes, frogs and other minatures to resemble a wee dwelling of magical beings. Very fun and my 80 year old neighbor loves it. She had to add some small pea gravel in lower level of birdhouse to stabilize it against the wind. So if you choose plants that have tiny leaves it makes all the difference. Valerie

  • Valerie Carrigg
    on May 11, 2016

    I am adding pictures to complete my comment from earlier. I have wanted to do this for myself and was able to help my neighbor utilize an old wheelbarrow she had laying around.

    , Non serviceable wheelbarrow used to make a gnome residence using dollar store figurines and items from around the house Used small leaf plants and sedum to complete the greenery, Wheelbarrow scene created in my neighbors yard
    • Bernice H
      on May 12, 2016

      @Thank You Valerie Carrigg and i love this. I no longer have the wheelbarrow, didnt bring it with me, but a little people or animal garden is so cute, what a good idea!

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