DIY Plywood Plank Floors

6 Materials
$225
3 Days
Easy

Yes, that says Plywood Plank Floors! - Trust me, it's easier than you may think! We did this in a bedroom! - People think they look like high-end expensive floors... However, we have discovered since then that it would be cheaper to do tongue and groove 3/4" pine (the back side of wainscoting, which is the flat side, would be up - we plan to do the rest of our home with this). I'd say the bedroom, which is pretty good size, cost us about $225 total - including the lumber yard cutting the planks for us from the plywood sheets, the oil base stain and oil base satin finish polyurethane - we were advised to use oil base products for durability by a professional builder/remodeler friend, and the pine plywood seems to have a very hard surface. Because of squeaky floors, we put down sub-flooring first and then glued the back side of the planks with Liquid Nails, as well as used a pneumatic nail gun (note that we used large nail heads). We love the rustic old look it has! Perhaps someone can shed more light on the tongue and groove flooring idea. It makes sense cost-wise for us to do, and we have about 2,000 sq. ft. to cover yet! People online talk about using cheap finished 1 side plywood - we did a LOT of looking around our area (Western NY), and did not find anybody that carried anything like that.
Getting a good start!
Almost there! - and this went very quick with 2 people! - Maybe about 2 hours! I measured, he cut and applied the Liquid Nails, I placed the planks and used the Nail Gun! :)
Ready for sanding! Literally sat on my butt and used a palm sander, which is quite user friendly. We might try sanding before install next time, but it seems that all the "real" hardwood floor folks install then sand...
Stain before some more sanding! - This time, I did the sanding by hand (before applying the polyurethane) to have more control of the color. With the plywood planks (pine - finished one side), it sure soaked up the color! - Made me glad we chose a darker color stain!
After sitting on my butt, scooting around the room sanding by hand, to get the desired look . / I'm sorry I don't have pix of the finished room without furniture, etc. in it - but trust me, it's beautiful! - everyone's impressed!!!
Here we are with some furniture in the room - this is used as a guest room and for our new grandbaby when she is with us!
This gives you a good idea of the satin finish. It looks rich! - I, personally, am not in love with shiny wood floors, so this is our desired look. All in all, we would say this was a fairly easy project - started very early on a Saturday morning - did the cutting of the planks and install on Saturday, as well as sanding and applying the stain. Sunday, was light hand sanding and touch up stain where I thought it was needed - waited for it to dry - and applied the first coat of polyurethane before bed. Monday, got up early and applied the second coat before we took off for the week! Would DEFINITELY do this again!! - only with the 3/4" tongue and groove pine - flat side up!!!!! - just because of the cost factor ... unless someone out there can tell us where to find that CHEAP finished one side plywood!!
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Have a question about this project?

119 questions
  • The Bachelorette Pad Flip
    on Mar 5, 2016

    Did you have the wood place cut them in strips and then you cut the strip planks down to size as you installed? Were they able to cut the planks into even edges..or did you notice slightly uneven when you put them next to each other?

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 5, 2016

      Yes we did have the lumber yard cut to almost 6" widths X 8' and then we adjusted accordingly. They have a vertical saw that can cut much more accurately than we could - and it was only $30. It was near perfect. Slight variation on a couple boards, but like I said, better than we could have done it and quite cheap to boot!!

    • We have concrete under the carpet. Would we still need a subfloor or just glue to the concrete? Danielle P.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 7, 2016

      I'm certainly no expert, but I believe you would want a moisture barrier and then I'm going to let the pros try and answer this for you!

    • Catsburg
      on Mar 7, 2016

      You obviously couldn't nail to the concrete as well as glue, but that it not an issue. What is is moisture. You have to know that there is no moisture migrating up through the slab. Like none. The quick and easy way to test this is to tape down a 2'x2' piece of plastic on the floor and wait a couple of days to see if there is condensation under it. The "know for sure" way is to go to your local big box or Harbor Cheap store and purchase a moisture meter. They are not that expensive and are cheap insurance. If the floor is dry you can just do a glue down. I would use adhesive designed for wood floors.

    • Sheryll S
      on Mar 7, 2016

      I love this floor, but what year did you do it? Because I cannot believe the price. Anyone know where to find such in Jacksonville, Florida? Also, please tell me more about installing on a concrete slab floor with Terrazzo? Thank you to any and all. Thanks to you Shari B.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      We just did this in August of 2015. You don't need expensive finished 2-side plywood. We paid about $18 each for ours and got 6 sheets - pretty sure we went with 1/2". And remember it's pine, not oak or other expensive. You put the unfinished side down, so it is a waste of money to get finished both sides. One quart of stain, one gallon of polyurethane and the nails and the liquid nails. So yes, that price is correct! 😁

  • Lamesa King Smith
    on Mar 6, 2016

    What brand of polyurethane did you use?

  • Julie Bradley
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Is it recommended that you glue it down? Our hardwood floors definitely have a little contraction and expansion from temperature changes… does this impact your floors/

    • John Grimley
      on Mar 7, 2016

      Personally, I wouldn't glue, I'd use something like a frame sealant. Mould and water repellant yet flexible and provide plenty of hold. You can even buy applicators to fix onto the end of the tube which will allow you to apply many thin beads in one pass.

    • SHARI B
      on Nov 20, 2017

      No, Julie - it does not affect our flooring. We do not experience the humidity like in the south and we have a basement underneath the entire house, so mold is not an issue - nor a worry. Being glued and nailed, it's NOT moving...

  • Nmk3
    on Mar 7, 2016

    I love it! Did you allow for space between the boards? What about using a pre-stain conditioner first to even out the color?

    • Bar3497761
      on Mar 7, 2016

      Pine is a soft wood so a pre-stain conditioner might be a good product to consider if you do not want a major color difference between the the grain patterns. It is sold at the major home centers. You can read the label and see how that might work for your project.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      Thanks for the tip!

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      No space between the planks - I had seen somewhere that the boards could shrink, so we butted them together

  • Glyniss M
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Could they be referring to exterior siding that is plywood?

  • Luisa Bustillos Newell
    on Mar 7, 2016

    This looks great! Love seeing these rustic, yet elegant ideas. Would you mind sharing which color stain you used? Thank you

  • Marie Kelly
    on Mar 7, 2016

    They look great! I love the dark stain. My one concern is that they are pine, a soft wood. Pine isn't a durable choice for flooring, especially in a room with heavy furniture. How are they holding up?

    • Melissa Ellis
      on Mar 7, 2016

      My 98 years old house has pine floors--and they look really great. They have a few dings but overall, they are beautiful.

    • Mag1120776
      on Mar 7, 2016

      Ask guests to leave skinny heel shoes at the door. They will ding the floor.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      We just did them in August, so only time will tell - but oil base is more durable from what we've been told. And the surface seems very hard / no impressions from furniture or anything. Keep in mind it's a bedroom though...

  • Marilyn Setzer
    on Mar 7, 2016

    What happens if something would get spilled on the flooring?

    • Beverly
      on Mar 7, 2016

      Top coat is polyurethane, so you would just wipe it.

  • Heather H
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Where did you end up purchasing your wood for the floor?

    • Paula Williams
      on Mar 7, 2016

      You an get plywood at any home improvement store or lumber yard. Home Depot or Lowes for example.

  • Jab2908254
    on Mar 7, 2016

    How big is the room you did? How wide did you cut your planks?

  • Villa Sarratt
    on Mar 7, 2016

    One word of caution, from a very bad experience, cover your mouth and nose while you are sanding anything!

  • None
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Could it be stained a much lighter color? Is this really cheaper than going with a laminate floor?

    • Kdc4631874
      on Mar 7, 2016

      Yes its cheaper! I put in a laminate floor in an average dineing area and went for the 89@ foot lanimate. Everything cost me over $450 at Home depot. (the cushion underneath, plastic, flooring and trim. My neighbors but it in for me.

    • None
      on Mar 7, 2016

      We just put laminate in the toy room. It was close to $400 but we got Pergo with the backing already attached. I had coupons so only paid about $60 for the whole thing and have enough left over to do a small room. What I see here looks pretty amazing though!

    • Mary
      on Mar 7, 2016

      Where do you find coupons for this type of stuff?

    • Bobbie larsen
      on Mar 7, 2016

      Love the look but Please get rid of bumper pads in crib. A child could suffocate !

    • Carrie Tait
      on Mar 8, 2016

      You can stain it any color you want- it is a light wood to begin with.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      We have had cheaper and more expensive laminates in our previous home. I'm not in love with laminate. This was a cheap alternative to real hardwood floors. How could we go wrong?!?! You could easily stain your floors to suit your own taste...or just poly them without stain, I suppose!

  • None
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Sorry another question. These are 3/4 inch thick? If they are tounge and groove could they not be put down as a floating floor or is the T&G only the long sides? I really like this btw :)

    • Kallie Jackson
      on Mar 8, 2016

      None of it is tongue and groove, it's literally plywood cut into strips then nailed down with edges butted together and glued and nailed down.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      Thanks, and we used 1/2" plywood. We plan to use 3/4" T&G pine for future flooring projects.

    • Janet
      on Aug 6, 2019

      If you are concerned with anything getting between the grooves, you can mix saw dust, preferably in the same wood, and make a "grout" mixture.

      From Bob Vila site

      Make a mixture of two part sawdust with one part fast-drying, oil-based sealer. Squeegee the mixture into the cracks of your floor. Wipe off any excess with a steel wool pad, so the floor is clean and smooth. Let it dry overnight and then apply the finish coat of your choice.

  • Terrie
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Is it moisture proof? Wondering how easy it would be to clean up spills and or pet accidents.

    • Carrie Tait
      on Mar 8, 2016

      They put polyurethane on it so it would be as moisture proof as any store bought flooring

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      I have actually spilled liquid on the floor and it cleaned up easily. You'd want to clean a dog mess or spill up quickly so it doesn't get into the small spaces between the boards

    • Robin
      on Mar 10, 2016

      Lowe's and home Depot both have it, it varies from $8.00 and up. Hope this helps!

  • Dee
    on Mar 7, 2016

    WOW your floor is gorgeous! I would love to do that in my home, but being older, we cannot be on our knees sanding and staining. Is the pine a hard wood? Will it dent with shoes or heavy objects? I love it and you sure hit the nail on the head on this project.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      Dee, Thank you! - Pine is not a hard wood; however, with the chosen finishes, it does seem to be quite hard. Also, keep in mind this is plywood, not solid pine. That will be our next flooring adventure! I haven't tromped around in there with high heels, but we have some heavy antique furniture with those small wheels, and I have not seen any impressions left by them.

    • Kathleen
      on Mar 8, 2016

      Dee when we did it in our trailor my husband used an electric sander on it and when he was dont I did the staining. We are both in poor health and it was easy for us to do working as a team The eletric sander was so worth the cost. Also we have 3 kids in the house at the time and I never saw a dent from them or the furniture. We did it when they were gone for the weekend at their sister's house. You can put the boards up on a table that is easier for you to reach and sand that way. Then stain that way too and then when you put them down on the floor it is all done except for the screws. Just a thought.

    • User
      on Jul 22, 2016

      we did ours pretty much that way also ... each single board set up on the sawhorses ... our old bag-o-bones greatly appreciated it :)

    • JudyH
      on Aug 7, 2019

      I totally agree - finishing wood before it is installed works great and the finished project looks so professional. We even used this method when installing new baseboards and quarter round. After the install we simply touched up over where the nails were which took only about 15 minutes.

  • Myra
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Could you do this over concrete?

    • Kenmac
      on Mar 8, 2016

      Over concrete, you will need to use a glue that forms a moisture barrier and apply it directly to the floor. You are also taking additional risk of some warping because you don't have the wood held in place by steel pins. Long term, you are taking a pretty high risk of using plywood strips instead of tongue and groove.

    • Sherry Stephens
      on Mar 8, 2016

      so you wouldn't put it right on top of concrete but put down a subfloor and then put the boards down. i am thinking all the floors in our area start out as concrete.

    • Trish Burton
      on Mar 9, 2016

      Would you put down a subfloor or just a moisture barrier and if it's tongue and groove it should lock in place-yes?

    • JudyH
      on Aug 7, 2019

      I would suggest you use a moisture barrier even if you apply a subflooring over the concrete. You might also go to a reputable paint specialty store, such as Sherwin-Williams, and ask them about applying a paint on concrete sealer (I'm thinking garage floor paint) before installing the wood flooring.

  • Lainey Howell
    on Mar 7, 2016

    Great job, and great look! A question: Is there a reason you lined up the nails instead of nailing at the end of each plank? I've never seen it done this way and just had to ask.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 8, 2016

      We wanted the floor to be "down" tight, and with 8' planks as our base, I tried to do some spacing on the boards (and also hit the stringers in the basement!)

    • Cherie
      on Mar 14, 2016

      You may regret this part of it because unless those ends are really glued tightly, they may pop up with a little dampness. I'd be very careful what you use to clean!

  • Jp
    on Mar 8, 2016

    We used 8" pine lap aiding and face nailed it. worked great.

  • Kerry
    on Mar 13, 2016

    How often will you have do the polyurethane finish ?

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 13, 2016

      Kerry, Honestly, I am not certain...this is our very first go-around with "wood" floors ... and since it's in a guest room/part time baby's room, it won't see the foot traffic as other parts of the house might. I'd assume the wearability of the poly should be the same as real wood floors. Maybe the experts out there can offer up an answer! I'd also wonder if there's a longer lifespan of oil base vs others - I am providing a link here that may help to determine which is best - http://woodfloors.org/finishes.aspxHope this helps! - Shari

    • Joseph Haynes
      on Mar 14, 2016

      There is a polyurethane specifically made for flooring. It's more durable than standard polyurethane. Check with your local big box store, if they don't have it then talk your local flooring store. This is a cool project. Thanks for sharing

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 15, 2016

      Thanks, Joseph! It was fun to do!!

    • Tonya Lee
      on Jul 25, 2016

      I did 7 coats in high traffic areas and 4 coats in bedrooms. Been perfect for 7 years so far

  • Neice McHan
    on Mar 14, 2016

    Hello Shari B. I think people are unclear about the comment: "However, we have discovered since then that it would be cheaper to do tongue and groove 3/4" pine (the back side of wainscoting, which is the flat side, would be up - we plan to do the rest of our home with this)." Could you give a link to an example of what that is? I can't figure if its a paneling or actual Wainscoting planks . Thanks ahead of time for your answer!

  • Pep2619781
    on Mar 15, 2016

    I do like the look of the plywood floors! I am thinking of doing mine in varied width planks, 4", 6", 8". Have you found the plywood that you mentioned, finished on one side? All it took was one phone call to my local Lowe's, and I found it. BC Plywood, Pine, finished on one side: 3/4" $27.58 per sheet, 1/2" $19.75 per. First 2-3 sheets ripped into desired planks free of charge, $0.25 per cut after those first 2-3 sheets. If I get this project going this summer I will definitely post pics.

    • SHARI B
      on Mar 15, 2016

      I have always been able to find the finished 1 side plywood, but not CHEAP like others online have posted - we used 1/2" for about the pricing you listed above. If I remember correctly, others had posted finding sheets of plywood around $12-$13 each (lesser grade), but I wasn't able to find those... That's why we plan to try the 3/4" pine tongue and groove for the remainder of the house - it's a bit cheaper! Many people use that for beadboard or wainscoting because of the grooves on the one side; we will use the plain side for the floors. If you look through the questions and comments to my post, you will see a couple that have started a project with the pine tongue and groove! - I look forward to seeing your post in the future!! :)

  • Joseph Haynes
    on Mar 16, 2016

    What screws did you use and how did you hide them?

  • Cyn6272681
    on Jul 7, 2016

    I'm thinking about doing this in our living room, dining room & hall way. How absorbant is the v edge planking? Is it better to go darker?

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 13, 2016

      I think it will give a more uniform look. I had done a test piece with stain only. You shouldn't see the extreme color variations like with the plywood planks, but will still see wood grain. I'd think you would want to lightly sand before you start staining. Would love to see your project pix - be sure to post on HomeTalk!

  • Sandra
    on Jul 18, 2016

    what was under the plywood???

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 18, 2016

      The home had OSB board under carpeting originally, and we added luaun on top of that

    • Susan
      on Jul 18, 2016

      What is Luaun?

    • Janet
      on Aug 6, 2019

      Lauan plywood is an underlayment

  • Mac7845546
    on Jul 18, 2016

    I would love to do this for our hone. What would you say the price per Sq ended up being? How much liquid nail was used?

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 18, 2016

      Guesstimating at about $1.75 per square foot. I don't have access to the receipts right now, but that's a good guess. My husband said he remembered using 3 tubes of Liquid Nails, and we just kind of loosely zig-zagged it on the back of each board.

  • Jade
    on Jul 18, 2016

    Could you use a lighter stain if you did not want a really dark look like yours?

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 18, 2016

      But, of course! - If you research the internet, you will find others have wanted a more beachy look and have done just that! - Color is always one's personal preference!! ;)

  • Kathy Gydus
    on Jul 18, 2016

    When can you come over and do mine?????????? LOL, it's beautiful, but alas I have cement under my carpet...It's a condo on a slab. I'd love to have polished concrete floors!!

    • Kristin Quintana
      on Jul 18, 2016

      You can! We just got done doing our basement concrete, using acid washing and we did it ourselves! Its something you can do!!!

    • Jeane
      on Jul 19, 2016

      What did you attach the wood to on a cement floor?

    • Anna Ibarra
      on Sep 14, 2016

      Jeane, if you look up at one of the earlier replies and post, a contractor, I believe posted how to do it on concrete.

  • Kra6785307
    on Jul 19, 2016

    What size did you cut the planks width wise I fell in love with this I cannot wait to do this its so beautiful thank u for sharing

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 19, 2016

      Thank you!!! The lumber yard cut them into 8 even widths of just under 6" from the 48" width X 8' lengths, and we trimmed as needed from there to get the random look. They told us the actual 4 X 8 sheets of plywood are not true size. Good luck with your project!!

  • Kathy Gydus
    on Jul 19, 2016

    Thanks for the vote of conficence Kristin. My condo is about 900 square feet. I know that I'd have to put down area rugs, especially in the winter...even though I live in NC, the floors do get cold because there's only 4" of concrete between my toes and the ground...lol. Can you please give me an "ish" amount of what you paid to do it?

  • User
    on Jul 22, 2016

    what grade plywood did you use?

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 25, 2016

      We don't actually remember, but it was 1/2" - finished one side - whatever our lumber mill was carrying at the time. It wasn't a super cheap one, because we couldn't find that anywhere. I guess you could say it was a middle of the road quality and price. Sorry I cannot be real definitive for you.

  • Bal6847698
    on Jul 22, 2016

    What did you in the doorway to join the other flooring

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 24, 2016

      We haven't done that yet, but will likely use wood transition pieces that we stain to match

    • Tonya Lee
      on Jul 25, 2016

      Here's mine 17x22 foot room for $150

    • Edith A. Robbins
      on Jul 28, 2016

      What color stain did you use on your floor, Tonya?

    • Tonya Lee
      on Jul 31, 2016

      Edith I used min wax "Fruitwood" with 7 coats of satin clear polyurethane.

    • Tonya Lee
      on Jul 31, 2016

      This is how I transitioned the floors

    • Tonya Lee
      on Jul 31, 2016

      Same with transitioning to carpet

    • Anna Ibarra
      on Sep 14, 2016

      Thank you Tonya, I am have a tiny office and I want to replace the carpet, but not to the hallway, so this is so helpful. I did want to lay my boards the other way making it to transition the same way as the transition board, is that a good idea, or not? I have no idea of what I'm doing, but I will give it a go.

    • Anna Ibarra
      on Sep 14, 2016

      Also, Tonya, did you use the same method in your first pic to lay down your floors? Love how it came out.

  • LACEY
    on Jul 28, 2016

    how would you put this down on a concrete floor........i love this......but i have concrete then carpet on top

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 28, 2016

      I believe if you look back through, I put this out there for contractors to answer - I can't be sure, but I bet if you search the internet, it would be similar to installing any other wood floor (or laminate) over concrete - I'm certain you will need a moisture barrier

    • Rebecca Walker
      on Aug 1, 2016

      You would lay sub flooring in you want to nail it down or you can do it as a floaing floor....you have to lay a plastic barrier down then a thin foam type sheet then the floor....from exp...this type of floor us VERY annoying if you have pets....their nails/claws tippity tap and its a hollow sound!

    • Tammy
      on Aug 1, 2016

      If you used tongue and groove then they lock into each other and you do not need glue or nails.

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 2, 2016

      Not sure I agree with Tammy on this - with basic laminate or even pre-finished wood that is tongue and groove, you do not need to nail or glue unless manufacturers instructions say to. But with the pine T&G, I'm pretty sure you should be nailing. This is not meant to be a floating floor, and I'd sure hate to see someone get any separation. Contractors?

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 2, 2016

      Rebecca - this flooring is not laminate and is very solid - no tippity tap from pets and definitely no hollow sound. We have had laminate, and unless you buy high end laminate, I agree with you regarding noises!

  • Debra Bales Chavous
    on Aug 1, 2016

    Where did you purchase this wood? Did they charge to cut into stripes? I love this look. I hope to be able to do this in the fall. Thank you for sharing.

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 1, 2016

      At a local lumber yard. They charged us $30 to cut it all for us. I have seen that other folks online have had their local Home Depot or Lowes cut it for them. I'm sure if you call around, you can find that out before you start your project! And have fun with it! Be sure to post pix of your project!!!

  • Sue Seibel
    on Aug 1, 2016

    How much did it cost to have all the plywood cut into the desired width? Did you sand edges before installing? Thank you!

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 2, 2016

      It was $30 to cut it into (just under) 6" X 8' planks. No sanding on the edges.

  • Gary Stansell Sr
    on Aug 3, 2016

    Is every board young and grove or are they just ripped down to width?

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 8, 2016

      None are tongue and groove - they are all ripped down to width

  • Maryanne Regan
    on Aug 4, 2016

    Hi I am very interested in the flooring project with the 3/4 in plywood sheets my question is can this wood be placed over concrete base and if so what prep needs to be done first can I also use a nail gun to get that rustic look nailing into concrete thanks Mary

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 5, 2016

      I'm certainly no contractor, but I know you need a moisture barrier / it'd be best for you to consult with your local home improvement store and/or a contractor. You may also find info with a few internet searches! Good luck!!

    • Deni Watson
      on Aug 13, 2016

      I can't get over how stunning this looks! I'm very impressed! Just bought a house and might need to do this in the two bedrooms that currently have carpet. Thank you for this article!

  • SHARI B
    on Aug 9, 2016

    LOVE the wider planks!!!!! - Would you do this flooring again?

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 11, 2016

      Yes, except we found it would be cheaper to use the 3/4" thick pine tongue and groove. That is the ONLY reason we would do it differently than shown here! Unfortunately, we found that out after we had already ordered our planks to be cut as we wanted, so we stuck with it for this particular project.

    • Sue Stringer
      on Aug 15, 2016

      Shari, you might want to rethink the pine floors. Pine is a soft wood and will ding and scar easily.

    • Cathy Howarth
      on Aug 17, 2016

      I have had pine floors in my kitchen for over 20 years. I have 3 dogs (2 very large) and they hold up very well.

    • Anna Ibarra
      on Sep 14, 2016

      Its it maybe on the thickness of the Pine, Cathy H., or that may be best or the quality, if that?

    • Charly
      on May 19, 2017

      Yes pine is a softer wood but that's what the polyurethane is for. To coat it, to harden it and protects it. And even if it were to get a couple of dings, so what? It's added character.
  • Wga9890417
    on Aug 11, 2016

    What sizes did you have the planks cut into ???

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 12, 2016

      Approximately 6" wide (8 even widths out of the 48") X 8' long

  • Beverly Pantone Bruner
    on Aug 13, 2016

    What is the thickness and grade of your pine plywood

  • Wendy Kay Skovo
    on Aug 14, 2016

    What would you say the cost per square foot was including the sub floor, ply wood, stain and finish?

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 15, 2016

      With the sub-floor, about $295. We paid a little extra for good quality Luan.

    • Sylvie Duval
      on Aug 16, 2016

      295$ per square foot? 😮

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 17, 2016

      Total, and I will get actual dimensions later today, to be able to determine...

  • Richard Stevens
    on Aug 14, 2016

    What did it cost to have them cut per sheet ?

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 15, 2016

      Total of $30, and we had 7 sheets of plywood. They charged us by time to do that. We had them cut it because they have a large vertical saw and we figured they would be more consistent than we could.

    • Roll tide terry
      on Aug 16, 2016

      I think Lowes cuts them free

    • Anna Ibarra
      on Sep 14, 2016

      I think Lowe's also limits you. But also good to check on it.

    • Veronica
      on Aug 6, 2019

      Lowe’s does limit you for sure. Then they charge. And it’s not always the best trained person cutting. I would go to a local lumber Mill.

  • Jal10253022
    on Aug 17, 2016

    (Im a bit of a newbie regarding stains, and polyurethane) Did you oil and/or poly the pieces before or after install? thanks in advance!

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 17, 2016

      We stained with light sanding in between - and then applied 2 coats of polyurethane. And, You're Welcome!! ;0)

    • Tina Taylor
      on Oct 21, 2016

      In the article she says she sanded and finished the floor after they installed it.

  • Cindy
    on Aug 22, 2016

    Were these cut tongue and groove?

    • SHARI B
      on Aug 22, 2016

      No, this particular project was just plain ol' planks. Next time we will buy T&G.

  • Denese Elliott Steward
    on Sep 1, 2016

    Who did you have to cut it? I was wondering about Lowes.

    • SHARI B
      on Sep 6, 2016

      Denese, I would check with your local Lowe's. We had a local lumber company cut it for us - they have a vertical saw, and quite frankly, for the added price of $30, it was so worth it to my husband - and he said it would be a lot more accurate than him trying to cut all that!

    • Wolf
      on Oct 23, 2016

      What do you think about cutting the planks into different widths? You could have 4", 2 1/2" and 1 1/2" widths.

    • Charly
      on May 19, 2017

      Good luck with that! Talk about asking for problems and extra work.
  • Sherri
    on Oct 21, 2016

    How did you handle the fumes from the oil paint and poly?

    • SHARI B
      on Oct 21, 2016

      We did it before we left for a week's vacation - finished up, took a shower, and headed out the door! I'm sure if you do some research or ask at your local paint/stain store, they can help you with that ... I have not checked into that.

    • BushAndBeachLife
      on Oct 22, 2016

      Open window, closed door & fan + filter mask or similar.

    • CHYREL
      on Oct 28, 2016

      I WANTED TO ASK WHY DID YOU NOT TAKE OFF THE BASE BROAD AROUND THE ROOM OR DID IT MATTER BECAUSE OF IT BEING PLY WOOD. IN MY LIVING ROOM I ALL READY HAVE A SUB FLOOR IT WAS UNDER THE CARPET SO CAN I PUT THIS PLY BROAD OVER IT THANK YOU!

    • Lori
      on Dec 4, 2016

      Use afloor blower in the doorway, open a window and it should remove the smell in day. Fire fighters use this method to remove smoke after the fire is out.

  • IFortuna
    on Oct 21, 2016

    What kind of sub floor did you use? And, why did you use nails instead of screws, the plywood looks very thin? Is it 1/4 inch? Thanks for your replies. : )

    • SHARI B
      on Oct 22, 2016

      We used Luan, which I believe is typical sub-floor or underlayment. We used a nail gun. My hubby says you could use screws, but we like the look of the larger nail heads, and it made it go really quick!! 1/2" plywood. No regrets on not using 3/4" either! Showed the floor to a friend yesterday, and she was just blown away that it was plywood! You are very welcome!! ; )

    • IFortuna
      on Oct 22, 2016

      I am really for doing this in the kitchen because we are on a pier and beam foundation that moves every time it rains. Consequently, our kitchen tile cracks and our engineered floor has buckled. However, I presented this to hubby and he said that the plywood was not made to be flooring and that the plywood will separate over time. Did your professional friend mention this to you and do you think this would be a problem in the future? Thanks again, I appreciate your help. : )

    • SHARI B
      on Oct 23, 2016

      Our home is over 6000 sq ft - we moved in June of 2014. Trust me when I tell you that this house experiences some movement. Change of seasons being in western New York is the leading factor for that. We see a kitchen on one side of the house have at least an inch separation from an outer kitchen wall to the Formica countertop backsplash, if that gives you an idea. By applying the liquid nails to the back of the planks prior to nailing, I'm not sure how much more solid you could get. And it sounds like it might be worth you giving it a shot! Ours has been down for about 14-1/2 months now, and it's so solid to the under floor, I don't anticipate it cracking or moving or separating. I will ask our contractor friend to see what ge says and get back to you! 😉

    • IFortuna
      on Oct 23, 2016

      Thanks so much. I am hoping that will tip the scales in our favor that you might be able to ask your contractor. Our house is small, there is just the two of us but hubby recently (9.11.16) had a heart attack and I would like him to do something that would not be too taxing. Tiling again would be too much of a job. He has got the tools to do a wood floor so I am hoping. Thanks so much again, your help is invaluable. : )

    • IFortuna
      on Oct 23, 2016

      Thanks so much. I am hoping that will tip the scales in our favor that you might be able to ask your contractor. Our house is small, there is just the two of us but hubby recently (9.11.16) had a heart attack and I would like him to do something that would not be too taxing. Tiling again would be too much of a job. He has got the tools to do a wood floor so I am hoping. Thanks so much again, your help is invaluable. : )

    • Pam
      on Jan 21, 2017

      In reference to your subfloor: use osb plywood. Luan is thin and expensive. We are using. 1 x 4 pine boards for our floors but would like an easier option ( large rooms).

    • IFortuna
      on Jan 21, 2017

      Thank you for the info. We may try this in the spring. Happy New Year!

    • Jkeith102@gmailcom
      on Feb 21, 2017

      I think it looks absolutely beautiful and you & hubby did a bang up job on the installation. Kudos on future endeavors!!

    • Mary
      on Feb 23, 2017

      fantastic job. That is so much nicer than the generic junk at Home Depot

    • Raymie
      on Feb 25, 2017

      Awesome idea and very good finished look. Luan is not standard underlayment. We always used roofing tar paper. Cheap, easy, and perfect vapor barrier. We are builders...want to try this in next house!!!!Yay!

    • Kathi
      on Apr 4, 2017

      Your floor looks awesome. You two did a fantastic job! Love it!!!!!
  • Denise Caffo
    on Jan 5, 2017

    I think it looks great,but personally I look the natural look.Maybe just polyurethane.

  • Rios Ino
    on Jan 10, 2017

    I really love the look of the floor and the way it came out, I am considering doing the same in my bedroom in the near future. I really like the color you picked out, What is the name/color of the stain you used?

  • Tami White
    on Apr 4, 2017

    My Mom does this in her rental properties. She puts down the whole sheet of plywood wood. I've never thought about cutting it in to plank's. She sands stains and puts alot of poly on. It's very durable. Yours looks great!!
    • Christina Lee
      on Apr 5, 2017

      Tami Whiter...do you have pictures of this?
    • SHARI B
      on Apr 6, 2017

      Thank you, Tami! - As Christina Lee asked, do you have any pictures of what your Mom does? - would love to see them! #somanypeoplersocreative
  • Roberta Kohler Robers
    on Apr 4, 2017

    You said you had the lumber store cut the plywood for you. Is it tongue and groove or just straight cut?
  • Roxanne Johnston
    on Apr 4, 2017

    Hi love the floor! I'm wondering how much of an odor comes from the stain and how long does it last?
    • SHARI B
      on Apr 4, 2017

      Ohhhh... quite an odor from the oil-base polyurethane - and it's an interior room, so no windows for ventilation... We ran fans, I'm guessing for about a week after we got back from our vacation, so that would have been 2 weeks later before it started to dissipate.
    • Sadie Moodie
      on May 19, 2017

      Putting a bucket with water should help with the odor
    • Veronica
      on Aug 6, 2019

      It takes weeks for the odor to completely go away. When using a polyurethane product you MUST use a certified vapor breather or you will damage your lungs.

  • Danielle
    on Apr 17, 2017

    What length are your planks and how far apart do you put your nails?
    • SHARI B
      on Apr 19, 2017

      8' planks. We tried to nail and hit the stringers below, but now I wish we had done only the ends and the middle.
  • Ella
    on Apr 27, 2017

    hi im sorry for being a noobie here but what kind of sub flooring are you talking about? is it another ply wood on the bottom of this project or do they sell special sub flooring for this kind of project? thanks i really love this project and when i move i will definitely do this
    • SHARI B
      on Apr 27, 2017

      We had put Luaun down (if I spelled that right!) May not be necessary, but we are doing it in each room as we remodel - the previous owner/builder used T&G OSB board (pressed flake board), and we wanted to be sure there was uniformity before we started with any new flooring / Hope that makes sense! You may not need it, especially if you have plywood base for your floors already.

    • Ella
      on Apr 27, 2017

      thank you SHARI B for your time answering my question!!! Have a great day @};-

    • Sue
      on Apr 28, 2017

      Is there anything that can be used as a sub floor. We have a concrete sub floor
    • SHARI B
      on Apr 29, 2017

      I'm going to defer that to fellow Hometalkers... anyone?? If nobody replies, I'd check with a contractor or put the question out there on social media. 😉
    • Dno2915172
      on May 19, 2017

      We used Red guard from Home Depot as moisture barrier.Then a less expensive pieces of plywood for sub flooring.
    • Ella
      on May 19, 2017

      very good indeed Dnolan and thank you so much...
    • S
      on May 19, 2017

      How will you clean? Beside sweep?
    • DebraLW
      on May 20, 2017

      I would imagine you'd clean the same way you would any wood floor. Vacuum, dust mop or sweep & use a wood floor cleaner for mopping.
  • Tegma
    on Apr 29, 2017

    Great job! I have seen where many have used underlayment as that was less costly. I was thinking of trying that in a craft room down in my basement, but am not sure how it would work on a cement floor. I am still not sure what you mean about using the wrong side of wainscot..... I've put up wainscot in my kitchen breakfast nook, & have not seen that in a 3/4" thickness. Most of the wainscot I see is thinner than that and difficult to work with. it splits easily. Where can I get 3/4" thick?
    Your family should love this room, and to have a crib ready for the new baby, what a treat! The whole room looks lovely!
    • SHARI B
      on Apr 30, 2017

      Thank you for your compliments!! -- I might be a little wary of using underlayment - only because it warps so easily - possibly if you glue and nail, that may work. I'd be willing to bet you'll need to add some sort of a sub-floor. But check that out with you local home improvement store or a contractor just to be sure. We purchased our Pine T&G (aka wainscoting) from Home Depot. Since then, we have found we can purchase it from an Amish saw mill that is not too far from us. In a previous post on this project, I posted pix of the 2 sides of wainscoting, and here are some pix (some call it wainscoting, some call it beadboard) -- you can easily see the grooved side and the other side is flat. Good luck, and be sure to post pix if you do your project!!! :)

      , Smooth side for flooring not the grooved, Not the side we would face up for flooring but shows the beadboard or wainscoting look, Shows Smooth Side UP
    • Dianne Bowers Turner
      on May 19, 2017

      In our area that is actually called Bead Board. You can buy it in 4x8 sheets or individual planks. It's intended to be used with the bead side up.
    • Mcgypsy9
      on Jun 18, 2017

      Shari B the only issue I would consider in using the tongue and groove is that after you stain it the color you used, the pattern of the wood will not be the same as the one you have already completed. I would stick with the same wood that you used here for that reason If you want the same look throughout. This should last for almost ever and if you have issues along the way, just make sure you have some of the wood on hand to replace it with. The way you put it down and polyurethaned it will certainly last for years to come.
      I would like to know how you are cleaning this floor?
      Beautiful job!
  • Val
    on May 19, 2017

    Did you have hardwood floors on before you started this and if so was it difficult to remove them. I have a room where the hardwood is so bad, I would love to this.
    • SHARI B
      on Sep 1, 2017

      Val - Only carpeting. Sorry, I just am seeing your question. If there were previous hardwoods, we surely would have refinished them.
    • Val
      on Sep 1, 2017

      Thank you.
  • Monica
    on May 21, 2017

    How big was your room?
  • Joycekozachenko
    on Jun 16, 2017

    would you do this in a ki
  • Debra Holifield
    on Jun 17, 2017

    Did you have to take up the base boards??
    • SHARI B
      on Jun 18, 2017

      No, Debra- we ran the flooring about 1/8" to max 1/4" away from the baseboard moldings - and then ran shoe molding around to finish the look. I'll try to post a picture so you can see it (tomorrow)
    • Debra Holifield
      on Jun 18, 2017

      oh thank you so very much!! I wasn't wanting to take them up for 2 reas--added costs and damaged walls or broken trim!
    • JudyH
      on Aug 7, 2019

      When installing wood flooring you always need to leave a quarter inch space between the wood floor and the walls/baseboard and then cover the space with shoe molding. That tiny space allows for needed contraction and expansion of the wood floor. Never jam the flooring tightly against the walls. It will make the floor buckle over time. Another important tip: Before you install your first row of flooring, carefully measure the length of your room and divide that number by the width of the boards you are installing. You do this in order to avoid having your LAST row of floor having to be ripped to a width less than two inches. If you find from the math calculation that you are going to have too narrow a row at the end, then you need to cut the width of your FIRST row of boards down some to give you a wider width on your final row.

  • Hde23102705
    on Jun 25, 2017

    Plywood comes in sheets I don't understand what you're talking about
    • Lee
      on Jun 29, 2017

      If you read her full explanation she had the lumber yard cut the sheets into planks. Looks like she had them cut 4 inches wide so you would get 12 planks out of a 48 inch sheet.
    • SHARI B
      on Jul 5, 2017

      That is correct Lee, except we got 8 even planks out of the 48" width - each one just a little under 6" / All planks we had cut were 8' in length, and we cut them accordingly here.
  • Shauna Johnson
    on Jul 1, 2017

    What about moisture! Between the plywood and original flooring?
    • SHARI B
      on Jul 5, 2017

      The original flooring was carpeting that we pulled up, along with the nasty old carpet pad / Under that was the particle board; I guess you would call that the sub-floor. We put luan down over that (just for minor added stability, because it is thin), and then put the floor down. We have a full basement underneath our house, so we are not over any cement. If you are concerned about moisture issues yourself, ask at your local Home Improvement store - they should be able to help you.
  • Carol Dire
    on Jul 5, 2017

    If you used over cement floor should you use moisture barrier ?
    • Carol Dire
      on Jul 5, 2017

      thanks , how would you fasten it down?
    • SHARI B
      on Jul 5, 2017

      Absolutely use a moisture barrier!!! - I just read a comment earlier in my post tonight about someone hiring a company to install an engineered hardwood floor over concrete - they said they tested for moisture.....now 3 years later, they are seeing dark spots around the edges.....they called in a 3rd party, and guess what? - no moisture barrier was used. I think they have a case against the company.
      How to fasten, I am uncertain about - I'll put that out to the experts out there to see if you can get a proper reply. If not, I am certain a contractor could help you with some information (everyone knows someone in the business, right?)
    • GBK
      on Oct 8, 2018

      I was just thinking the same thing; only a floating floor with plastic underlayment would work in a concrete basement. As soon as a nail pierces the moisture barrier, poof, no more moisture barrier!

  • Michael Beggs
    on Jul 7, 2017

    why did you not make plugs for the screw holes before sanding and staining?

    • SHARI B
      on Sep 1, 2017

      Michael - We used a nailer and purposely searched for larger nail heads; we like the look of those! In the future, we will use tongue and groove - and no nail heads will show - we are switching to T&G because it is a little bit cheaper.
  • JdyPat Lynch Gatley
    on Jul 10, 2017

    how did you sand with nails showing so clearly? those nails would destroy any sander.

    • SHARI B
      on Jul 10, 2017

      They are countersunk just a little - and I literally sat on my butt or kneeled and used a small orbital sander ... which worked well, as it seemed to provide better control. :)
    • Veronica
      on Aug 6, 2019

      And I bet her shoulders hurt for weeks from the pressure you have to exert in sanding. I would have rented a professional floor sander and saved my shoulders.

  • Khe13597303
    on Aug 7, 2017

    Will this work over a tiled basement floor
    • SHARI B
      on Aug 7, 2017

      I guess that depends on what kind of tile and what is underneath it. Everything over cement should have a moisture barrier - first and foremost. If it's ceramic/porcelain tile, you will need to tear that up first and start again. Best to check with your local home improvement store to be sure you are following all the appropriate steps. :)
    • Ansley Bradford
      on Aug 28, 2017

      No, it will not work....the moisture content that is always in the concrete slab (of the basement floor) will adversely affect the pine
    • Nancy J Goldwire
      on Sep 16, 2017

      Definitely not work.

  • Jon Mccord
    on Aug 7, 2017

    Can you buy the plywood already cut ??
    • SHARI B
      on Aug 7, 2017

      Not that I am aware of - not readily available in the size you may want. But many folks have told me that the Big Box Home Improvement stores will do it for free! And, FREE is GREAT!!!
    • Ansley Bradford
      on Aug 28, 2017

      In our area, the 'Big Box' stores charge .50 per cut....buyer beware!
    • Rona
      on Sep 17, 2017

      It's beautiful
    • Vonna Stanley
      on Oct 7, 2017

      Very nice .I think I would like to do this.
    • Cookies7
      on Oct 7, 2017

      We did this in my daughters room. We used 1/4" finished plywood. Lowe's cut for us. We paid $90 for all the wood, and the cuts were about $9. It was super simple, and we only nailed, and not glued. Beware when you have the box stores cut, the cuts wony be exact. We liked that it looked more like a barn floor. We plan on doing this on our main floor next summer.
    • SHARI B
      on Oct 10, 2017

      Agreed. The lumber yard we used has a vertical saw that provides for more even cuts; however, we like the rustic look like barn floors you mentioned! Would love for you to post pictures!!
  • Lonna Lipparelli
    on Aug 27, 2017

    How FAR did your jaw drop?
  • Shirley Ann Biggham
    on Sep 20, 2017

    How did you do the seams
    • SHARI B
      on Sep 21, 2017

      Shirley - We just butt the boards together...nothing gets between, and it worked out very well! We are more than pleased still over 2 years later!!
    • Ela466197
      on Oct 7, 2017

      What size are the boards?
    • SHARI B
      on Oct 10, 2017

      We used 1/2" pine plywood - finished 1 side. We had the lumber yard cut it into even cuts across the 48" dimension of the 4' x 8' sheet, so we ended up with 8 strips of just under 6" x the 8' long. You could get 4' lengths if that's easier for you, but we liked the width around 6". Hope that makes sense to you. You can use other finishes on the plywood, but that will depend on your budget!
  • Susan
    on Oct 7, 2017

    did you purchase at a flooring store or a homedepot/lowes? it is just called" unfinished plywood flooring"
    • SHARI B
      on Oct 8, 2017

      It's just 4' x 8' sheets of pine plywood - 1/2" thick - finished 1 side. Please note that there are several different types of plywood that will give you different looks and also several price ranges to go along with those.
      You can buy at Home Depot or Lowe's, but we bough at a local lumber yard. We paid them to cut the sheets into strips, but people have indicated HD and Lowe's cut theirs for free - and you can't beat that!! 😉
  • Teresa Fabbro
    on Oct 7, 2017

    How would you mop? The stain would come up. And scratch easy.
    • Cindy Antley Packard
      on Oct 7, 2017

      Not after polyurethane.
    • Lulu
      on Oct 7, 2017

      I believe the 2 coats of polyurethane they applied would be enough of a barrier to protect the floor. The more you put on the shiner it will get. She didn't want too much shine. I think the floor is beautiful and I would love to try this.
    • Danielle Plante
      on Oct 7, 2017

      It's sealed with polyurethane
    • SHARI B
      on Jan 29, 2018

      Thanks to those that answered this question! - I guess I missed it last Fall :(
      Teresa - we have had absolutely zero problems with this floor and still love it almost 3 years later!! :)
  • Lynn
    on Oct 7, 2017

    what kind of nails did you use?
    • SHARI B
      on Oct 10, 2017

      They were larger nail heads, because we like the look it gives - and we used a nail gun.
  • Alesia Jones-Parra Sipes
    on Oct 7, 2017

    What was the underlayment?
    • SHARI B
      on Oct 7, 2017

      Standard luaun, over top of existing OSB tongue & groove that builder had used. Previous owners had carpeting.
  • Vickie Whitenack Lee
    on Oct 7, 2017

    how long do you have to stay off floor after you polyurethane it ???
    • SHARI B
      on Oct 7, 2017

      we used oil base for durability - and we did the 2nd coat of poly just on our way out the door for a week's vacation. Not gonna lie - it smelled bad, even when we got back. However, it was an interior room, so no ventilation whatsoever - just fans. Follow your manufacturer's instructions, and talk to the folks at Sherwin-Williams. Good luck with your project!!
  • Rebecca Sharp
    on Oct 7, 2017

    What was the final cost?
  • Deborah Stark
    on Oct 7, 2017

    Where did you buy the floor?
  • Astra Lilly Keena
    on Oct 10, 2017

    I just ripped the carpet out of my daughter's bedroom, and it is down to the plywood... so what kind of board do I need to start with please
    • SHARI B
      on Oct 10, 2017

      Yayyyyy!! Carpet be gone!!!!! We used 1/2" pine plywood - finished 1 side. We had the lumber yard cut it into even cuts across the 48" dimension of the
      4' x 8' sheet, so we ended up with 8 strips of just under 6" x the 8' long. Hope that makes sense to you. You can use other finishes on the plywood, but that will depend on your budget! GREAT LUCK to you on this, and we will be looking for your pictures!!! Also, please note that if you have baseboard moldings, you may want to run the boards close to them, and put a shoe molding over top - just don't cut yourself short and have any gaps.
  • Chris
    on Nov 1, 2017

    Where did you find the plywood planks?
    • SHARI B
      on Nov 2, 2017

      We bought sheets of plywood from a local lumber yard and had them cut them to size - you can have any lumber yard or Home Depot or Lowe's type of stores do that for you. OR...if you are handy and have the proper tools, you can cut them yourself! :)
  • Vicki Bouska
    on Nov 6, 2017

    I have 4 full sheets in my kitchen after pulling up carpet..if don't want to cut in planks would I use pretty much same technique to get those results?
    • SHARI B
      on Nov 7, 2017

      Vicki - I have seen folks definitely do this!!! - And, I believe they use a permanent marker, like a Sharpie, to draw lines to give the plank look - and then they stain & poly over that. Search it on the internet, and I'm certain you will find the answer you are looking for! Please post your pix of your project!!! - I love seeing them! :)
  • Christine Andrada
    on Nov 28, 2017

    Was your base Wood or concrete?
    • SHARI B
      on Nov 29, 2017

      Wood

    • Sheri Vaden
      on Jan 24, 2018

      She indicated they put a plywood subfloor so was able to nail and glue to that. I’ve done my guest room like this 4 years ago and still LOVE AIT!!
  • Andrea Alvo
    on Dec 15, 2017

    What stain did you use?
  • Lynn
    on Jan 24, 2018

    Isn't plywood pressure treated wood?
    Or did you use some that is not treated?
    • SHARI B
      on Jan 24, 2018

      Lynn - I believe the plywood we used is for internal use only. I just did a quick internet search and see that they do make pressure-treated plywood, for use in outdoor playhouses, etc... If you are worried about chemicals, our plywood was not green and was not meant for outside use.
    • Hope Williams
      on Jan 25, 2018

      plywood, like most wood, comes both ways. Pressure treated for outdoor use and untreated for indoor use.
  • Cinda Raybon
    on Jan 25, 2018

    What floor was under the wood?
    • SHARI B
      on Jan 25, 2018

      OSB sub-flooring. Which is a particle board.
    • Cinda Raybon
      on Jan 25, 2018

      Wonder if could be applied on top of concrete? Absolutely beautiful by the way
    • Debra
      on Jan 26, 2018

      I believe that a moisture barrier would have to be applied to concrete before any flooring surface could be laid. Our house was built on concrete foundation and we stripped the flooring out and found the moisture/water barrier under, it was a challenge to remove.

    • Rebecca
      on Jan 26, 2018

      How did you get the tongue and groove on the plywood strips for each each plank? Beautiful flooring by the way!
  • Purtty123
    on Jan 25, 2018

    Can you apply this to ceramic tile?
    • SHARI B
      on Jan 25, 2018

      Probably not - but you could double check with a contractor or your local home improvement store. If we were doing it, we would take up the tile and start with fresh sub-flooring. I know it's a lot of work, but we like to "do things right the first time" / Hope that helps you with your decision! :)
  • Lu-Anne
    on Jan 26, 2018

    Could this project be done over 50 year old pine hard wood floors? I love the wood tones in my river front house but they are badly in need of help. Lots of water damage stains but they are pretty solid. Just too thin and probably too costly to sand down and refinish.
    • SHARI B
      on Jan 26, 2018

      If you have original hardwoods, I'd shop around first to make sure you can't save them!!! Heck, you can rent a sander yourself and just have someone do the Stain and Polyurethane work, if you're not up to it!

      If that doesn't work out, I don't see why you couldn't do this over top, but I'm wondering if you'd want to run the grain the opposite way... Any contractors care to answer that?
  • Rebecca
    on Jan 26, 2018

    How did you get the tongue and groove on each board from plywood? Beautiful floor by the way@
    • SHARI B
      on Jan 29, 2018

      Thank you for the nice comment, Rebecca! We did not T&G the plywood. That is how we are going to do the remaining flooring in our house!! We simply butt the edges together and have had zero issues!!

      We are getting close to doing the T&G floors for the rest of our house (found out it would be cheaper) and will definitely be posting that project!
  • RestoreAholic
    on Jan 27, 2018

    Curious if you tried the tongue and groove yet???
    • SHARI B
      on Jan 29, 2018

      We have not, but are getting "close" - in the process of scraping popcorn ceilings in 2 bedrooms and an upstairs hallway, then paint, then flooring! I will definitely post our project when we do it.

      I can tell you, however, that at the Amish lumber mill in our area, the guy that runs it, told my husband that they have a LOT of people using it for flooring!! So, I am SO excited to get at it!!! :)
  • Lottie
    on Jan 29, 2018

    Is this interior or exterior plywood. Wondered how it will hold up after light moppings
    • Cheryl Blackman
      on Feb 3, 2018

      Damp mop with vinigar water going with grain can dry after ward with dry cloth same way
    • SHARI B
      on Feb 4, 2018

      Thank you for the reply, Cheryl!! We have only vacuumed with a floor brush so far - it's a guest bedroom, so it doesn't see much use and is not in a main traffic area! How much vinegar to how much water do you use? Warm water?
    • DN
      on Aug 6, 2019

      I would not use vinegar on finished wood because it is acidic and could eventually dull the finish. Maybe Murphy’s Wood Soap or a diluted liquid Castile soap mixture would work better.

  • Susan
    on Feb 3, 2018

    Did I miss the measurements of the planks? Or did you not post?
    • Cheryl Blackman
      on Feb 3, 2018

      I read on Pentrest 6 inch but we did our 7 & 1/2 & love it. We did out living room, bedroom and going to do the rest of the house next.
    • Cheryl Blackman
      on Feb 3, 2018

      We used sanded one side ply wood we bought at Lowe's
    • SHARI B
      on Feb 4, 2018

      Susan - We got 8 equal planks out of the 48", so just a little less than 6" each (allow for cuts the width of the saw blade) X 8' long / note that we did not have the lumber yard trim the ends- and like Cheryl here, we bought finished (sanded) one side plywood from our lumber yard.
    • SHARI B
      on Feb 4, 2018

      Cheryl Blackman - would love if you would post pictures of your floors that you have done!! :)
  • Cos32505191
    on Feb 3, 2018

    Look fabulous..!! Congrats.. I have cuestion how many inch the plywood?
    • Daniel
      on Feb 4, 2018

      You could use any thickness you wanted.
    • SHARI B
      on Feb 4, 2018

      Cosmopolitan - Thank you for the nice comment!! -- and,
      Thank you again, Daniel! We used 1/2" thick, but you could use 3/4" if you want. For us, 3/4" would have been a waste of money because the 1/2" is very, very stable. The planks were cut to just under 6" wide X 8' long
  • Lottie
    on Feb 3, 2018

    is it EXTERIOR or INTERIOR plywood used?
    • Daniel
      on Feb 4, 2018

      Interior untreated plywood would be used
    • SHARI B
      on Feb 4, 2018

      Thank you, Daniel! - Yes, definitely interior.
  • Koda58
    on Feb 4, 2018

    I seen measurement of 6 or 7 and half but how long were there planks cut?
    • SHARI B
      on Feb 4, 2018

      We used 4' wide X 8' high Plywood for starters. 48" x 96" - the lumber yard cut them with a vertical saw into 8 even planks across the 48" - so they were close to 6" wide (note that you do lose some for the width of the saw blade) / and all planks were the 8' or 96" long. We started with a long one and used them frequently, laying and cutting like you would a normal wood floor.
  • Susan Newell Logan
    on Feb 6, 2018

    What did you use for sub Flooring? Did you put down a moisture barrier? Just wondering, my house is on a slab.
    • SHARI B
      on Feb 7, 2018

      We used luaun. We were going over OSB (particle board). We have a basement. If you decide to do it, you likely should use a moisture barrier. Talk with your local home improvement store or a contractor about that.
  • Jessica Barrett
    on Mar 24, 2018

    Beautifully done! Out of curiosity, may I ask how much tongue and groove pine is where you are? It’s nearly 5x the price of the cost of the plywood floors here. I would much prefer the pine tongue and groove if I can find it within my budget...


    Thanks!


    Jess

  • Cmk336600
    on Apr 4, 2018

    Now that it been down a while how does it hold up

    • SHARI B
      on Apr 4, 2018

      Actually, we are still very happy with our choice to do this. It is holding up very well!

  • Kim32573690
    on May 6, 2018

    How do you attach the wood to a concrete floor

    • SHARI B
      on May 7, 2018

      You for sure will need a moisture barrier, and best for you to talk to someone from a home improvement store - or even better, a contractor. I don't believe you can go directly over cement.

    • Michel Payette
      on Sep 5, 2018

      I would install the moisture barrier (black paper) over the concrete, then concrete nail 1"x3"s every 12". Then, glue and screw your plywood planks over the 1"x3"s. You could also use 2"x4"s, but it would eat up a little bit more on the thickness of the floor. Michel

  • Kim32573690
    on May 23, 2018

    Can you do this over concrete?

    • SHARI B
      on Nov 12, 2018

      Sorry Kim - I missed some posts from a while back - yes, likely - you will need a vapor barrier, and I think you should talk to your local home improvement store - or hit up a contractor just to be sure or for advice.

  • Cathy Brown
    on Aug 14, 2018

    What was the price per square foot all in ?

  • Sue
    on Nov 3, 2018

    How should this be applied to asbestos titles? I was told to just cover the titles up and to not pick them up.

  • Trudy
    on Nov 3, 2018

    I also want to know if it could be done over concrete in a basement?

    • Lonny Reever
      on Nov 3, 2018

      You would need to put a vapor barrier down. By doing this you would not be able to glue the wood down or nail. You would have to drill and use cement screws. I would use a floating laminate floor. This type snaps together and locks all the pieces together. I did this in my basement and it works beautifully. Been 4 year sand no problems. You could also use a vinyl stick down floor that looks like wood. Lowes and Home Depot have a lot of options.


    • BG
      on Nov 3, 2018

      You have to test how much water is coming through your concrete. Tape on all sides a 8"x10" piece of 5mm plastic and leave it for a few days to see how much moisture It traps from coming from below. If it is too wet, you have to but drain pipes outside to move moisture away from your house. If you can proceed you would have to place a 6mm plastic sheet barrier down first. Usually they then put strips of wood down on the plastic and top it with sheet goods, building an air space. Then they lay the flooring on the sheet goods. Nothing is ever easy about floor laying.

    • Trudy
      on Nov 3, 2018

      Thank you BG and Lonny for the reply. I want a floor in my workshop that will look good and take abuse. I have stick on LVT and a floating faux wood floor elsewhere in the house I did, but I want something tougher. Back to researching...

    • SHARI B
      on Nov 12, 2018

      Thanks for the answers, folks! - Always a vapor barrier, and you could do so many other options with your floor! - I saw someone do 24" x 24" squares in a kitchen once - it was awesome!!! Trudy, be sure to post if you do it! ;)

  • Carolyn from NH
    on Nov 3, 2018

    I love the raw look of the wood, so after sanding could I then just poly it? How many coats?

    You did a wonderful job, hope it lasts you forever and thank you very much for the great idea 🤗.

    Carolyn from N.H.

    • Lonny Reever
      on Nov 3, 2018

      You can do this if your wood has the grain pattern you like. I would put at least 4-5 coats on for durability. The more coats the deeper the finish will look and the more durable the finish. If you can stand the odor, I would use an oil base poly, it is more durable then water base.

    • Patty Connolly Arnold
      on Nov 3, 2018

      Shari B used pine plywood which is a soft wood. It dents easily. High heel shoes will leave dents. So 4 or 5 coats of poly should help prevent those dents.

    • Julie Geweke Workman
      on Nov 3, 2018

      If you want the look of the natural wood, put a natural stain on it before you apply the polyurethane. Pine is a soft wood, so it will dent more easily. We have "real" wood floors, and it was recommended to let them cure for 7-10 days after they were refinished before moving furniture back in. I know that most people don't have the luxury of extra space to do this, so when you move furniture back, don't drag it! (I used protective furniture movers for the bigger items.) Also, wear socks, not shoes and not barefoot for the first month or so if possible. (We never wear shoes in the house anyway, so this wasn't a big issue.)

    • PilgrimBaby
      on Nov 3, 2018

      If you are going for rustic look, pine (consider a soft wood) is great because it will dent over time & it just adds to the look...as long as it’s not a deep drag mark. As it ages and you refinish it & new layers of poly -it all blends into the look of it.

      If you want a polished smooth finish...you will have to choose a hard wood. If you have a local small mill nearby they will sell their discards cheap. But you will need to cut them into strips/plank size. Then thru a plane to get them a uniform thickness. But it makes a gorgeous floor with minimum cost, but it ups ^ your personal labor time.

    • SHARI B
      on Nov 12, 2018

      Yes, by all means use poly!!! I have to disagree with those that think this dents - we are shoe wearers in the house, there's furniture on it, my granddaughter tosses toys around and plays in there - there are NO scratches and NO dents in my floor. Remember that this is plywood, and it's not solid pine, the top ply pine layer is on top and is not that thick, so if raw wood, it might dent some - but after the oil base poly, it surely has a nice hard surface on it!! Not to worry...you should be just fine!

  • Jean
    on Nov 3, 2018

    Did you cut the plywood into planks then put it down. ?? Thanks looks good. I want to do that in my den. Thanks 🙏🏼

    • TW
      on Nov 3, 2018

      She said that the lumber yard cut it into planks for them.

    • SHARI B
      on Nov 12, 2018

      We actually had the Lumber Mill where we bought it cut it for us - hubby was concerned about straightness, and they have a vertical saw that is much more accurate than he said he would've been. They didn't charge us a lot to do it either.

    • Jean
      on Nov 12, 2018

      Thant you. Very nice.

  • Dianne Darnold-Ripley
    on Nov 10, 2018

    Could I get complete written instructions for this project?

    • SHARI B
      on Nov 12, 2018

      Dianne - You can probably highlight the post and print it out; I'm not certain if there's a better way to do it! ;)


  • Debbie Michael-Borchers
    on Nov 29, 2018

    How do you clean stains on carpet???

    • SHARI B
      on Nov 29, 2018

      I'd recommend searching Hometalk for some simple solutions for carpet stains. That's not what this post is about.

    • Rosie
      on Dec 16, 2018

      I 've removed almost every stain (even white carpet stained with spaghetti sauce) with hydrogen peroxide, this is not Clorox). Saturate the stain with hydrogen peroxide (straight from the bottle) and allow to dry. Do it again if some stain remains. This WILL NOT change the carpet color,I was reticent at first. Carpet of nylon is easy. Carpet of polyester takes 2Xs. Carpet of ground soda pop bottles the hardest but, all successful. We have a large dog with diarrhea (now is OK) and two kitties who cough hairballs or worse and we live in the country.

  • Rodney
    on Dec 6, 2018

    I have concrete floors with tile, I’m in the process of removing the tiles, after I get done with that, would I use the liquid nails to adhere the plywood to the concrete or is there something else ??

    I am definitely going to try this probably in the office, carpet is easy to rip out.

    Thank you it looks really nice.

    • SHARI B
      on Dec 7, 2018

      Rodney, I suggest consulting with a contractor or a Home Improvement store about that. I'm not in a position to answer, other than say that you really have to have a moisture barrier. So many have asked, and I just don't have the answer - that's one for the "pros"

  • Patricia Fitzgerald
    on Dec 13, 2018

    I was under the impression that the floor was supposed to b "floating" ? Does the floor creak ? Did u use underlayment ?

    • SHARI B
      on Dec 13, 2018

      It is not a floating floor - We used Liquid Nails, as well as Nailed it. No, the floor does not have a creak in it anywhere! :) And, yes, we put sheets of luaun subflooring down over the existing OSB board they used under their carpeting when the house was built.

  • Mary C.
    on Dec 28, 2018

    I would try this,but I have a question. How can I make this waterproof. I have small puppies and they have accidents.

    • SHARI B
      on Dec 28, 2018

      I think if you use multiple coats of polyurethane (and note that we used oil base, because it provides a harder, more durable finish), and you wipe up in a reasonable amount of time, you should be fine.

  • Nicole Milller
    on Jan 17, 2019

    Hi, I am wanting to do this in my new house but one of my carpenter friends said he would be afraid of the floor "lifting" if it happened to get wet... I am wondering if anyone has had any problems with that? He did suggest using tongue and groove so maybe that would be a better option, I just wanted to whitewash my floor instead of stain it and I am worried about getting everything blended very good with painting "after" its installed?!!

  • Hermye
    on Jan 20, 2019

    I would love to have this done in my kitchen. Would it be practical? Would I have to remove all the cabinets?


    • Melissa Rector Dalessandro
      on Mar 17, 2019

      no there should be a front panel on the cabinets the comes off or you can just but it up to them.

    • Hermye
      on Mar 17, 2019

      Thank you so much. You have help me a great deal with my decision.






    • Lynn
      on Aug 6, 2019

      I am certainly no expert but I have read that you don't want to install cabinets on top of your flooring--it need to be able to expand and contract and the weight of the cabinets could interfere with that. We are about to do some kitchen remodeling and new flooring is on the list--so I have been reading up on this kind of thing so we don't make more than the 'normal' amount of boo-boos!

    • Linda
      on Aug 6, 2019

      I don't think you would need to pull your cabinets.

    • Janet
      on Aug 6, 2019

      The only reason you would think about removing cabinets is if the existing floor is under them.Some builders and flippers put in flooring before cabinets and naturally they are sitting on your flooring.

      If you install over existing floors, then you will have a "rise" in the floor if you don't do the entire house. Solution, if this is the case....

      If they are under the cabinets, tile can be chipped away up to the cabinets. If it is wood, a sawzall can cut the wood up to the cabinets. Have someone who knows how to use a sawzall. You can get hurt with these and you do not want to cut into your sub floor.

    • Karen
      on Aug 6, 2019

      Next time I'd remove the baseboards before installing the flooring. Baseboard is suppose to 'hide' the edges and give a more finished look. I LOVE this...it looks great!



  • Kathryn Reedy
    on Feb 3, 2019

    Hi, you mention that you found tongue and groove wainscoting would be cheaper. Where did you find it? Thanks!