How To Make A Paving Stone Planter Box !


Last year there was a great sale on paving stones, priced at 5 for $1.00 at Lowes. So we purchased 200 of them. Months had passed and it finally came to me what we could do to utilize the inexpensive stones.
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
So we had to get the ground level for this process. The area was dug out.
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
We used a 2 x 4 and a level for the area to make sure it would be flat.
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
To help keep stones from shifting we used paving base the full length of the box, 8 feet by 17 inches for a narrow box that was needed for the area.(Paving base 3 - 40 pound bags).
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
Stamped into place and measured again for leveling .
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
Laying of the stones.
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
This look was done with 3/4 of the stones.
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
I filled with perennials for a year around look ,this also makes my planter box cost worthy.
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
For my love of birds there are a few bird houses located through out our property.
how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
I just love how this came out next to my crafting cottage where I spend a lot of time enjoying nature!
Any price and availability information displayed on [relevant Amazon Site(s), as applicable] at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.
Hometalk may collect a small share of sales from the links on this page. More info

Top Hometalk Projects

20 Easy Concrete Projects You Absolutely CAN Do!
20 Easy Concrete Projects You Absolutely CAN Do!
18 Fun Ways To Add Glitter To Your Home Decor
31 Creative Garden Features Perfect For Summer
11 Unexpected Ways to Use Spices in Your Home
14 Cool Ways To Upholster Chairs That You Can DIY
15 Fabulous Fire Pits For Your Backyard
31 Creative Garden Features Perfect For Summer
30 Essential Hacks For Cleaning Around Your Home
The Easiest Ways to Grow a Bumper Crop of Tomatoes
31 Amazing Furniture Flips You Have to See to Believe
31 Coastal Decor Ideas Perfect For Your Home
15 Kitchen Updates Under $20
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
31 Amazing Furniture Flips You Have to See to Believe
Ana illausky

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

Go

Have a question about this project?

44 questions
  • Adela Rodriguez
    on Mar 9, 2016

    Did you use cement on the pavers/bricks?

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 10, 2016

      Hi Adela! We did not use cement, we use a little mortar glue that keeps the blocks from shifting , Thank you!

    • Jua3924681
      on Mar 10, 2016

      No cement is needed. Their weight holds them in place.

      how to make a paving stone planter box, concrete masonry, container gardening, flowers, gardening, raised garden beds
    • Jennifer Brooks Warns
      on Mar 10, 2016

      I heard Gorilla Glue actually works well, but haven't tried it myself

    • Malinda
      on Mar 10, 2016

      Love these flower beds :)

    • Mary Thorne
      on Mar 10, 2016

      So cost effective - and pretty.

    • Cos2668036
      on Mar 10, 2016

      Really like this! So pretty.. Will try...also love the idea of a crafting cottage😊

    • Kathie Elia
      on Mar 10, 2016

      Very nice!

    • Carrie Tait
      on Mar 11, 2016

      watch out with gorilla glue- it expands and can get really messy. I have found mastik works well and holds up very well in the weather

    • Donnaevans194
      on Mar 11, 2016

      Now I know how to cover the ugly skirting along the back of our mobile home!

    • Gina
      on Mar 12, 2016

      Donna, I'm with you! My first thought was, "Thank you! A brilliant and beautiful way to keep animals from getting under my shed!"

    • Jean McCormick
      on Mar 13, 2016

      Great planter box. I can't wait for Spring, since it is upon us in SC!

    • Tricia
      on Mar 13, 2016

      Great job, and I love the bird houses.

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 13, 2016

      Thank you so much!

  • Mansetomboy
    on Mar 10, 2016

    Very nice! What grow zone are you? If you are up north, you may need to increase the dimensions to allow more soil in the planter so that the perennials survive the cold winters. Great use for bricks, great bargain, and well done!

    • Gina
      on Mar 10, 2016

      Looks like maybe South Carolina.

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 10, 2016

      We are in South Carolina! The Winters are mild! Thanks!

    • Brenda
      on Mar 10, 2016

      Wow! How did you get South Carolina out of the little bit that showed in the pictures @1 result is available, use up and down arrow keys to navigate.?

    • Ruth Richardson
      on Mar 11, 2016

      Don't know about everyone else but the poster's location shows at the top of all US entries - in this case, York, SC. Outside the US, it simply shows the country.

  • Kathy
    on Mar 10, 2016

    what are the birdhouses siting on? Are they plant holders?

  • Holly
    on Mar 11, 2016

    Looks wonderful. Thinking of asking my landlord if i can do something like this in my back yard. How tall did that planter end up?

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 11, 2016

      @Holly Hi Holly, This one is 12 inches high. I wanted mine short and narrow for the space. You could go taller if you wish. Thank you!

  • Evelyne webb
    on Mar 11, 2016

    Can I plant tall bamboo ?

    • Don Paul
      on Mar 11, 2016

      Bamboo should be the non invasive species or in containers as they are very invasive plants that will continue to spread and are almost impossible to get rid of. They have even been outlawed as new plantings in some municipalities in NJ now and the number is growing.

    • D.
      on Mar 11, 2016

      Don, is correct about bamboo being an invasive plant. There is no way to stop it from spreading. It can go thru concrete and if you try to dig it up, pull it out or burn it- it comes back even more vigorously. It is also true that the bamboo plant has been banned in areas because of its extreme invasive nature. Keep yourself and your neighbors happy by choosing a different plant. This is based on my personsonal experience. Thank- you. -D.

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 11, 2016

      Hi Evelyne, It is correct bamboo is so invasive! Not for planter boxes! They are very strong and grows to take over. They make good natural fencing .

    • Sandra
      on Mar 11, 2016

      My husband once bought a house that had a stand of bamboo. He HATED it. It was a constant struggle to,keep it under control. It does make a beautiful fence, and it is a beautiful plant. But every time I even suggest bamboo I get a look. Lol. So, no don't plant it!

    • Christy
      on Mar 11, 2016

      Bamboo hell!!

    • Terry
      on Mar 14, 2016

      And it is very messy!

    • Martha Samarco
      on Mar 22, 2016

      Heavenly bamboo

  • Donna
    on Mar 22, 2016

    Just to be sure...your planter was 8 ft. x 17 in. ? Thanks! We are getting ready to measure and order our materials. So excited!

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 22, 2016

      @Donna Hi Donna, Yes! We made ours very narrow for the space, we have a small pond and needed a walking path between the areas.Have fun!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Ingrid Loftus Arnold
      on Apr 19, 2016

      Ive had a pile of bricks sitting around thanks for the awesome idea

    • Ana illausky
      on Apr 19, 2016

      Your Welcome!

  • Joyce Lanyon
    on Mar 22, 2016

    Did you get any birds to nest so low to the ground?

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 22, 2016

      Hi Joyce, birds,butterflies and bees are checking out this area, now that all of the flowers are in bloom sense the beginning of this post. So lovely to see!

    • Susan Kortenbusch
      on May 21, 2016

      Cats have easy access though

  • Brenda
    on Mar 22, 2016

    Did you use mortar to hold the stones in place?

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 22, 2016

      @Brenda Hi Brenda, we used a little stone glue to keep from shifting because they are small bricks.We have done this in other areas with much larger stones and it was not needed because of the weight of them.Thanks!

    • Sandy
      on May 21, 2016

      Lowes (or any home improvement store) sells locking sand for paver projects.

  • Faith
    on Apr 21, 2016

    Was that a special deal on the bricks or do they always sell them at that price??

    • Ana illausky
      on Apr 21, 2016

      Hi Faith, It was a special deal, Right now they are $.33 cents each at Lowes here in South Carolina. They often have sales on them in the Summer! Thanks!

  • Patty
    on May 21, 2016

    Did you use top soil or potting soil?

    • Ana illausky
      on May 21, 2016

      Hi Patricia, for this project, top soil and potting soil was used. !/3 of top soil and the rest potting soil. Thanks!

  • Sue Sanders
    on May 21, 2016

    Did you line the inner sides with something to keep your dirt from filtering out along the cracks.? I did a project like this and have lost some of my dirt. My husband lined the bed with chicken wire to keep moles out but we didn't put up a barrier to keep the dirt in place.

    • Ana illausky
      on May 21, 2016

      Hi Sue, I had on hand weed barrier lining. It helps with keeping soil in, also breathable for water.Thanks!

  • Mary
    on May 21, 2016

    I have an 8 x 8 shed that my dad and I built and I've been putting out 4 tall flower pots on the ground and then have 3 hanging pots hooked to the side of the shed. Every year I think of the money that gets spent on annuals and I cringe. I'd like to build your flower pot, and put in perennials, so here are my questions: 1.) How many bricks total did you use? 2.) How did you do the pattern of yours? I love it, but I can't see how you started. 3.) Did you have to saw any of the bricks? I love your flower pot!

    • Ana illausky
      on May 21, 2016

      Hi Mary, there is no cutting! they are puzzled in over lapping each layer.Approx.175 to 190 stones depending on height that you want.Thanks

  • Anna Pope Spieth Willis
    on May 21, 2016

    Where did you get the little wrought iron stands for the birdhouse? How did you attach them?

    • Ana illausky
      on May 21, 2016

      Hi Anna, the wrought iron stands were purchased at Kirklands. The houses were bonded with Loctite outdoor adhesive.

    • Ana illausky
      on May 21, 2016

      Hi Anna, the wrought iron stands were purchased at Kirklands. The houses were bonded with Loctite outdoor adhesive.

  • Mar6376810
    on May 21, 2016

    Did you anything to attach the bricks to each other or are they just laid on top of each other?

  • Brn2714373
    on May 22, 2016

    This is so pretty! what did you use to cut the pavers to size on the ends?

    • Ana illausky
      on May 22, 2016

      @Brnbetty No cutting,thanks!

    • Jmb4895859
      on May 24, 2016

      The pavers are turned at the ends to make the sides.

    • Mar6376810
      on May 25, 2016

      If you ever need to cut the pavers, first use a pencil to draw a straight line around all four sides where you want to make the cut. Then take a thin metal chisel (there's probably a technical name for this tool) that's about 2 inches long and place it on top of the pencil line. Lightly (or medium lightly) use a hammer to tap the top of the chisel handle; tap once or twice, move the chisel down the line, tap some more and continue all the way around the paver. It may take several taps, but eventually the paver will break into two pieces along the pencil line. Tip: The line really needs to be drawn on the width of the paver; I haven't had much luck cutting diagonally. I haven't tried cutting on a long side.

  • Jodi Stanul
    on May 22, 2016

    Did you line the planter with anything to prevent soil washing out thru the cracks in the rain?

    • Ana illausky
      on May 22, 2016

      Hi Jodi, Weed barrier I had on hand.Thanks!

    • Jua3924681
      on Jun 5, 2016

      Dear friend that leveling agent is not necessary, it is a cement-sand mix that hardends with moisture. And you could used cinder blocks for the back, just place one on top of another, with out any cement. It also acts as a retaining wall.

    • Ana illausky
      on Jun 5, 2016

      Hello, because these were small bricks, the leveling agent works very well and goes a long way per bag illuminating the cost for cinder blocks that would be extra to our project. Thanks!

  • Car5563557
    on May 22, 2016

    I've never heard of paving base. Is is better than sand to prevent shifting? Also, where did you buy it & was it costly?

    • Ana illausky
      on May 22, 2016

      Hi Carol,The base is called Earth essentials-by Quikrete(great for enterlocking stones) at Lowes under $4 a bag.It's better than sand,it has a mix of sand and a setting agent mixed in to settle the stone. Thanks!

  • Jenn
    on Jul 14, 2016

    What time of year did you find such a deal at lowes? Love the idea!!

  • Bernice Janssen
    on Jul 20, 2016

    Love the planter! I would like to try this under a sign, but am wondering if it will be strong enough when it is not against a wall such as how you have it. How do the bricks stay on top of each other?

    • Ana illausky
      on Jul 20, 2016

      Hi Bernice, the bricks are enter locked and free standing with a little mortar glue. Also to help against moisture, there is an 1 1/2 inch away from my cottage wall. The planter is 7 months old now and going strong! Thank you!

  • Taj Johnson
    on Aug 13, 2016

    How does air get in from all sides to dry it out?

    • Ana illausky
      on Aug 13, 2016

      It's open on on sides above ground level with drainage!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Karen Rath Wanserski
    on Feb 4, 2017

    How do you keep the bricks from starting to falling over once the dirt is in place? I see no nothing to hold them together. Thanks ahead of time the answer!

    • Ana illausky
      on Feb 4, 2017

      Hi karen, we used a little stone adhesive, and paving base to a leveled ground. This helps from shifting. 2 years later no problem!

    • Shari
      on Feb 18, 2017

      Years ago when they would build stone walls theres nothing cementing them together. This allowed for natural settling and these walls last 100+ years. The weight of the rocks kept them in place.

  • Jodi
    on Feb 18, 2017

    I love the planter, great idea! But what I REALLY want to know is where did you get the Crafting Cottage from? Or did you build it? I really want/need off those!! 😊

    • Ana illausky
      on Feb 18, 2017

      Hi Jodi, My husband and I built my cottage from the ground up, we took a basic design on line and made a few changes of our own. There are more how too's on my blog here on hometalk! Thanks!

  • Dj
    on Feb 18, 2017

    Does the paving base deter weeds from growing in the "box"?

    • DB
      on Feb 18, 2017

      I think it is high enoughgh that existing weeds under this structure would not poke through. However it is always a good ideaa to remove what is visible before you build (These folks definitely did that as they dug down and leveled). Keep in mind that eventually weed seeds will blow into the new soil. The advantage here is you don't have to bend down so far to dig them out. Ana & co., it looks great!!

    • Ana illausky
      on Feb 18, 2017

      Yes, It is a sand/cement base. Thanks!!!!

    • Susan
      on Feb 20, 2017

      Looks terrific!! 😃👍

  • Diana
    on Feb 19, 2017

    Did you glue them in place so they would not bow under the pressure of the soil?

    • Ana illausky
      on Feb 19, 2017

      Hi Diana, we used paver base after level of the ground, this helps with shifting and also weeds.Also a little mortar glue.

    • Jeanette S
      on Apr 8, 2017

      From my experience with stones, I have found that they sink into the ground over time so I would suggest pouring a concrete footer for the this planter. Investigate if you need to leave a couple of weep holes in the configuration so water can get out and not invade the foundation of your house.
    • Ana illausky
      on Apr 8, 2017

      Hi Jeanette, we used paver base, which is a form of concrete and sand. It helps with shifting and becomes a solid when wet. Also the planter box is a stand alone feature that is 2 inches from my craft cottage which is built on block footings separate from the ground . Thanks!
    • Barbara Wheeler
      on May 28, 2017

      Did you have a problem with the dirt seeping through between the bricks?
    • Ana illausky
      on May 28, 2017

      Holding just fine!
  • Daw7513522
    on Feb 28, 2017

    This is genuinely beautiful, JUST what I needed in the back of my house where the soil is too clay like to grow anything. I suggested to my husband to build above grown w/good soil! WHAT would you say was the most difficult part? Getting the stones to lay correctly?

    • Ana illausky
      on Feb 28, 2017

      Making sure the grown was level, this helps with all the components to come together! Thank you!

  • Strongminded
    on Mar 4, 2017

    how high do you think you can stack the bricks with out falling over? Do you think knee high is too high? (so I wouldn't have to bend?)

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 4, 2017

      Hi Shanae, Make sure ground is level! Use paver base to help with shifting, also a little stone glue as extra protection. Walls have been built with less for centuries and still standing! Why not build waste high! Good luck!

    • Jewellmartin
      on May 26, 2017

      And it is amazing what an extra 8-12" in height will make to your back. 😇
    • Sue Nevitt Marlette
      on Jul 11, 2017

      And be sure to stagger them evenly, stone glue will keep the wall from toppling over in freezing weather.
    • Jolene Draper
      on May 20, 2018

      If the ground is level and the bricks are staggered you could make it as high as you wanted.

    • Joseph Girard
      on Jul 12, 2018

      You can always use adhesive

    • Janet Ferkovich
      on Jul 19, 2018

      Got a lot out of this question and answer. Didn’t even know that base existed and I often wondered “how the heck?” Now, I’m so excited❣️ My husband built my raised garden/vegetable planter boxes waste high for me and I love it! I can vision a theme now♥️👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻🎉

  • Britt Britt
    on Aug 30, 2017

    I live in a city-my "backyard" is a pretty big sized area of non-level cement. My landlord is ok with "beautifying" but I don't know that laying more cement to level a piece of the patio counts. Any suggestions?
    • Vikki Clyburn
      on Jan 27, 2018

      Can you design the bed to follow the Uneven part? Maybe 2 levels?
    • Carla Danger
      on Jul 17, 2018

      Use sand and Tamp down.


    • Lin Collins
      on Jul 19, 2018

      You mean there is a concrete pad which is not level due to settling over the years? Or was it deliberately built with a slope? Using sand on top of concrete won't solve your problem. If not too much of a slope exists you could cut a piece of treated 4 x 4 to match it, using it as a base for your bricks

  • Nancy Harris
    on Feb 27, 2019

    We are 87 yrs and 78 yrs old, downsizing. Our new house has a landscaped small fronbt yard. The back yard will be up to us. The homes patio is tiny, we need to add on to it. How much were the pavers and where did you get them

    Love what you've done. Thanks Nancy

    • Lia
      on Mar 30, 2019

      Nancy... in the post she said she got them from Lowe's Home Improvement Center on sale for 5 for $1.00, which is a phenomenal price. They're currently selling there for .64 a piece.

  • Donna
    on Mar 30, 2019

    The Birdhouses are a really nice touch. Where did you get them? I find a lot of feeders few houses. Great project!

  • Mary Dodge
    on Mar 30, 2019

    Did you cement or use mortor to stabilize the bricks?

  • MB
    on Mar 30, 2019

    Beautiful. And love that you have a craft cottage, I want one too. I didn’t see a link for tutorial, did you have to cement or glue bricks together or did they stay up on their own? I am curious if thereare any issues we can anticipate if they are not secured after adding the soil. Thank you🌸💐

    • Colleen
      on Mar 30, 2019

      I have done something similar and i just dry stacked the brick, no cement or glue and it has stayed just fine. Every once in awhile a brick on the top might get bumped out of place but it is easily moved back into place. The dirt inside seems to hold it all together.

    • Janet
      on Mar 30, 2019

      I also built something similar, and did not have to glue the bricks except I did glue the top row because it was in front of a porch and wheat ended to sit on this wall. But inside I put a black plastic liner that you can find at Home Depot. I felt this would really keep the soil from coming out between the bricks

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 30, 2019

      Just a little mortar glue, after 4 years standing strong! Thanks

    • Tricia
      on Apr 6, 2019

      I built planters also. However, I laid mine out sideways and glued them together with outdoor construction adhesive. Then attached a layer on top to prevent mulch and soil from escaping. Used far fewer brick, so I actually had enough to make one on BOTH sides of the shed. I lined mine with landscape fabric before adding the soil. They've been in place, without issues, for about 8 years now. I really love them!

  • Trish Butler
    on Mar 30, 2019

    Do you not need to use cement with this project? I would think that anyone living in a region with huge temperature fluctuations (snow, ice, etc.) would cause the bricks to shift and eventually fall apart.

    • Eli27296962
      on Mar 30, 2019

      That would happen even if they are cemented together, but when built like this, you can just tap them back in place when a paver starts to pop out.

    • Nancy Fedor
      on Mar 30, 2019

      Yes that will happen, even if you use motor.

    • Nancy Fedor
      on Mar 30, 2019

      Yes that will happen, even if you use motor.

    • Jimmy M
      on Mar 30, 2019

      You can buy a couple of tubes of construction glue and place some between each brick. That's the most common prescription for that problem.


    • Spuddy
      on Mar 30, 2019

      I certainly recommend waterproof construction glue. You can get it at the Lowe’s or Home Depot in caulking type tubes.

    • Jill Ron Pike
      on Mar 30, 2019

      It's not a problem if the bricks are not stacked tightly. The space between them allows for temperature fluctuations, and loose bricks are much more easily replaced than mortared ones. The base was tamped and leveled, so there shouldn't be much shifting from there.

    • Ana illausky
      on Mar 30, 2019

      We just used a little mortar glue in S. C., here is a picture of the planter box 4 years strong as of 3/28/19. Thank you!

    • Felicia
      on Mar 30, 2019

      I like your very practical answer. Some people complicate things too much. 🥴

    • Cheryl Williamsen
      on Apr 1, 2019

      Glue isn’t a substitute for mortar and in this case, the planter needs to be able to conduct water flow, IMO.

    • Get R Done
      on Apr 2, 2019

      As a contractor I would recommend that you use a construction adhesive that is especially designed for concrete and masonry applications. Or as someone commented earlier use a pre formed plastic liner to contain the soil and stack your pavers around it. But whatever you do do not skip or skimp on the base materials underneath and be sure to wet it some before ramping to achieve maximum compaction. This part is probably the most important part of all as the better your base the less likely it is to heave from freeze thaw cycles

    • Michael
      on Apr 6, 2019

      You can use liquid nails if you're concerned about shifting. A spot on each end of the brick will do. A firm base will prevent settling problems. These bricks are very durable.

    • Phyllis
      on Apr 6, 2019

      When you use the tamper the cement is not needed for this type of project. The pavers weight will help the stones to keep their shape from shifting, would be my guess

  • R
    on Mar 30, 2019

    Very pretty. What kind of plants did you plant. Hard to see in the picture.

  • Marlean
    on Apr 6, 2019

    Did you use any adhesive to keep the bricks in place?

  • Dinah
    on Apr 6, 2019

    Don’t the stones fall apart I see you staggered them. Is that all you had to do?

    • Kim Rupp
      on Apr 6, 2019

      Their probably Morten’s together

    • Annette
      on Apr 6, 2019

      They would stay in place fine without adhesives, especially given the way they leveled the ground.

    • Delores
      on Apr 6, 2019

      If you are living in a freeze zone, they may move but you can put them back in place.I do a lot of stone walls like that here in SD

  • Karina
    on Apr 6, 2019

    Where did you get the birdhouses from. I love them!

  • Nicole Wilson
    on Apr 6, 2019

    Love the addition of bird houses. Did you buy them like that with the stick attached or did you make them like that

  • Patricia
    on Apr 6, 2019

    What holds it together? I didn’t see any cement mentioned or anything else that would keep it together.

    • Jacquelyn
      on Apr 6, 2019

      It’s not really high enough to need anything to hold it together. Friction does the job.

    • Vicki Putman
      on Apr 6, 2019

      Lowes does sell block glue that you can use if you are concerned about shifting. It's in a tube.

    • Chela Del Chuco
      on Apr 6, 2019

      Even silicone or caulk will hold it together, yet allow for removal if need be. Cause that stuff can easily be scrapped off, yet still provide a good acceptable strong bond.

    • Ame Warren
      on Apr 6, 2019

      It’s not necessary. And I think, as an added bonus, there’s plenty of places for drainage.


  • Linda
    on Apr 6, 2019

    My son is bldg a house in York. How can I save this design or share it ?

  • Betty Bennett
    on Apr 6, 2019

    I am assuming a crafting cottage is a super nice name for a she shed?

    • Liz
      on Apr 7, 2019

      Yes. If using a nicer name like crafting cottage, it might be an upgrade from a shed, perhaps with lighting, power, heating/cooling, a window for ventilation, etc.

  • Richard
    on Apr 7, 2019

    How to make a wood gate on side of house

    • Liz
      on Apr 7, 2019

      This question does not apply to this project. You need to ask this question as a new topic.

  • Ellen
    on Apr 7, 2019

    Did you glue these into place?

    • Liz
      on Apr 7, 2019

      There is nothing in the materials list for adhesive. This is a dry stacked brick planter, held in place just by the weight of the pavers.

  • Jewels Williams
    on Apr 7, 2019

    What product did you use to keep the bricks in place?

    • Liz
      on Apr 7, 2019

      There is nothing in the materials list for adhesive. This is a dry stacked brick planter, held in place just by the weight of the pavers.

  • Brenda
    on Apr 7, 2019

    Is that a portable Premier shed? We have 1 and I love this idea for around the outside of it! Thanks for sharing!

    -Brenda Lynn

    • Ana illausky
      on Apr 7, 2019

      Hi Brenda, we took basic plans and changed them to make my space with a higher roof line for storage, and a few feet wider. Also we made the door way to fit 1 door instead of double doors(like a shed), window added for natural light. Thanks

Join the conversation

4 of 478 comments
Your comment...