Dalyce G
Dalyce G
  • Hometalker
  • Willow Springs, MO
Asked on Apr 5, 2012

How to build with the oodles and gobs of rocks on our property.

Linda TDalyce GKMS Woodworks
+12

Answered

We own 9 acres of woods in the Mark Twain National Forest in South Central Missouri. Our rolling acreage is chock a block full rock. From pea sized, including thousands of brick to concrete block size and up to the size of a Volkswagen Beetle boulders. We are planning a new home and would love to use the stone to build the house. What are the specifics on doing this? Is this a possible do it yourself project after the home is built or during the process? And is there an easy way to split the huge boulders?
15 answers
  • Loretta H
    on Apr 5, 2012

    There zoning and permits and there also the Public library and Mother Earth News Magizine

  • Steph C
    on Apr 5, 2012

    Our house in Pa (near the Poconos) is built from the stone from the land, but I wasnt there when it was done! (1969) However, having planted a bazillion things in the land, and having built a short stone wall with what i dug up - I cannot imagine digging a foundation, and collecting all those heavy rocks and then matching them up - PLUS the rocks you dig up will not be uniform, and you may have to do some chiseling to fit them. You can probably participate in the building of your house, but doing it yourself would be a lengthy and arduous task...

  • Darlene S
    on Apr 5, 2012

    Years ago I lived on an acre that was attached to a farm owned by my exes Uncle. Each of his kids got a huge hunk of the land when they got married. The one daughter and her husband started to do just what you want to do. They wanted to incorporate the huge rocks into the house. They didn't plan. They didn't do research. They just started to stick rocks where they wanted to and tried to make them fit. It was a complete and utter disaster. Although the house was livable it looked a hot mess! They ended up spend loads of money to a contractor to fix it. I'm not saying that you shouldn't try this. Honestly, I think it's a good idea in many ways. Asking this question is your first step. I would also do tons and tons of internet research. I'm sure if you word it right, you may just find exactly what you need in full instructions on the web. If you don't get all the answers...I wouldn't be afraid to call a mason or someone like that and ask them. Also I'd try the library. Good luck to you.

  • Dalyce G
    on Apr 6, 2012

    Thank you Darlene! There are several very old homes here made from the stone on the property, they always are located in or near a pasture, many are still lived in, some the roofs have caved in or fire has consumed every scrap of wood. They are straight as an arrow though! But asking around the area, (we aren't locals) but it seems to be a lost art form. One older gentleman told me you would always see the stone houses near the pasture because it had all once been woods and rocks and the early settlers cleared all the woods by hand and horse and picked up all the rocks to use in the structures just so they could use the acreage. WOW is all I can say. I can't imagine.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Apr 6, 2012

    Building with rocks does not take tons of tech...Machu Picchu was built from rocks ages ago...there the stone work was so fine that many of the wall were constructed without any mortar. It can be done but it take lots of time...more time than "modern man" is willing to spend. When labor is cheap this is a viable method...it just depends on how much time you want to invest.

    , Rock fitting at Machu Picchu
  • Kim S
    on Apr 24, 2012

    Send your rocks to Charlotte, NC! Rocks cost a fortune here.

  • Dalyce G
    on Apr 25, 2012

    Kim S, come on down, we can load you up with as many as you can haul and never miss them :)

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Apr 25, 2012

    I remember camping in the outer bank of NC some years back...we heard stories of how someone's "campfire ring" was stolen. When my parents visit here from NC they often take rocks back with them. They have a few large basket ball sized quartz boulders from my yard.

  • Kim S
    on Apr 25, 2012

    It's so true! I was on a field trip with kids from my daughters school and there was a huge boulder at the nature museum, the kids were asking me "what is that?"!

  • Sherrie S
    on Apr 25, 2012

    Daylce G, you are lucky people. Those rocks/boulders cost a mint here in Florida and a small rock pile sold by the pound is shocking in cost. I know because I have a pond and waterfall with real rock. Maybe one of those companies that sell rock might want to buy yours.

  • Dalyce G
    on Apr 28, 2012

    We sure have plenty, the bad thing is the ground is so rocky that its hard to garden like I am used to. Back home you could push a jelly bean in the ground and it would grow LOL

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Apr 29, 2012

    @Dalyce...what kind of yield do you get with your jelly bean plantings?

  • Dalyce G
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Haven't you ever heard of a jelly bean bush? LOL. Joking aside, raised beds seem to be the route to take here. This year I have decided to try planting tomatoes in straw bales. The topsy turveys were a big disappointment. I hope to post a pic of my bumper crop later this year and finally get my canning jars back out! :)

  • Linda T
    on Jul 22, 2015

    I live in Southwest Missouri, and raised beds are the only way to go. Any digging in the ground has to be done with a pick.

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