How do I finish a wall and make a doggie gate?

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How do I finish a wall that looks like this? And make a doggie gate? While I was in the hospital my dear Little Brother decided to wall up the kitchen and add a doggie gate to keep the youngest dog out, (She only listens to me) I have been home for 3 months and this is what I look at every day.
He said He measured it 5 times before He cut it and it still came out all caddywonkerd.
He suggested I put wallpaper over it to block the open spots. Oh heck no! Also He came find a doggie gate that does not sag. And ideas??
q how do i finish a wall that looks like this and make a doggie gate, fences, home maintenance repairs, major home repair, wall decor, This is the view from the dinning room
This is the view from the dinning room
q how do i finish a wall that looks like this and make a doggie gate, fences, home maintenance repairs, major home repair, wall decor, Right side
Right side
q how do i finish a wall that looks like this and make a doggie gate, fences, home maintenance repairs, major home repair, wall decor, Center
Center
q how do i finish a wall that looks like this and make a doggie gate, fences, home maintenance repairs, major home repair, wall decor, Left side
Left side
q how do i finish a wall that looks like this and make a doggie gate, fences, home maintenance repairs, major home repair, wall decor, View from the kitchen
View from the kitchen
q how do i finish a wall that looks like this and make a doggie gate, fences, home maintenance repairs, major home repair, wall decor, Down the right side wall
Down the right side wall
  13 answers
  • Debbie Debbie on Apr 14, 2016
    It looks like quite a bit of patching, taping, and texturing needs to be done on both sides. Luckily a large bucket of drywall texture/paste is not expensive. The longer the span, the greater the possibility of sagging. How wide is the new doorway?
    • Ruth Grimley Ruth Grimley on Apr 16, 2016
      Thank you Debbie. I do not know how wide it is, and still can't bend over or squat yet. I just know every sort of gate He tries to buy or build it sags.
  • William William on Apr 14, 2016
    He gets an "A" for attempt, A "D" for execution. The gap on the right side dining room side is too large for patching. It also looks like he ran short and tried to fix it with a spacer. The gap on the left is also too large to patch. Any type of attempt at patching would result in failure of the patch. Also the drywall does not look like its flush with wall. On the kitchen side: I see there is no stable support for the drywall arch - it can flex. There is no header above the doorway - this can cause sagging. No studs 16" on center - which is code. Just one down roughly the center - some 1x shelves. My opinion would be to remove the work and start from scratch. Look online for information on building a wall.
  • Lagree Wyndham Lagree Wyndham on Apr 14, 2016
    What is the room it looks into? Kinda looks like a dining area turned catch-all room. Honest opinion, I would take that wall down and start over or take wall down and add additional space (ie counters, cabinets and storage) to the kitchen. I say this not knowing your budget or anything...i tend to dream big.
  • 9530106 9530106 on Apr 15, 2016
    Other than starting over-here is what I would do, being a single woman! I would fill all the gaps with drywall patching plaster the best I could. Then either buy some textured paint or texture additive for paint, that resembles the texture you have as closely as possible. You may have to do a little tweaking to try and blend it in with the existing wall. Then paint everything with a flat paint, so that the differences don't stick out quite so much. The arch appears to be the original doorway, so that should be okay. I am assuming you are keeping the kitchen side as is. Good luck! Obviously I am not a drywall-er, but I have had to make a lot of things work for myself!
  • Mcgypsy9 Mcgypsy9 on Apr 15, 2016
    Well, since the work is already done and I am sure would be a mess to take down, here is my suggestion. Go and buy some wood and wood trim. Have 2 pieces of wood cut to mimic the arch at the top (one for each side. It doesn't look like the arch to the top of the door opening is that tall, so just be sure your wood is tall enough to cover both. Your wood should be wide enough to go completely across + at least add 4 more inches to each side of the opening. Let's just say your opening is 8 feet across. So you would need to buy (2) 1/2"x 12" x10 foot long pieces of wood that will cover the whole top. You can leave it straight or have it made to arch as the top of your opening is. You won't need all 10 feet but measure and cut off what you don't need. Next, buy some 1/2" x 4 or 6" x 8 ft. Pieces and use them down the sides over the seams. Etc. Have someone put them up for you or put them up yourself using an air gun (you can rent this if you don't have one from lowes or wherever) once all is in place, all your seams will be covered and you can paint or stain it what ever way you like. Hope this helps! Good luck!
  • Melissa Jane Melissa Jane on Apr 15, 2016
    Take it down! It's not helping you. Go to apartmenttherapy.com for ideas on compact storage in small spaces on a budget. Paint the cabinets white and put a pressure rod with a curtain across the back of the kitchen where your washing machine is,
    • Debbie Debbie on Apr 16, 2016
      @Melissa Jane I like this better than trying to fix it. The archway is wonderful!
  • Melissa Jane Melissa Jane on Apr 15, 2016
    Also an inexpensive expandable baby gate works well to contain pets.
  • Cindi Cindi on Apr 15, 2016
    I'd put it back like it was, I love arches in homes and you hardly see them anymore. You can always get an expandable pet gate if you need to keep the dog out.
  • NancyMaria NancyMaria on Apr 16, 2016
    Old fashion child/dog gate that accordions for better storage. Get two if the opening is too wide. Check local 2nd hand shops or dog care sites on line. Found this one for under 50.00, just leave out one hinge pin and use flat. Can hook to the walls with large cup hooks and use one section as a small door for people.
  • Tena Abbey Tena Abbey on Apr 18, 2016
    I love the arch! I, too, would take it down! But it is hard to find an affordable expandable gate to span that distance, so if I were you, I'd put in 2 half walls or even 3' tall bookshelves, one on either side. That way you can still have the storage on the kitchen side, and be able to fit a gate. If you use bookshelves, you can easily put something like wainscoting on the back for a more finished look.
  • Ruth Grimley Ruth Grimley on Apr 18, 2016
    I haven't fixed it yet, but I plan on taking the advice I found here and putting it to good use. Thank you all for helping me figure this out.
  • Karen Karen on Apr 20, 2016
    Definitely remove that "wall" and if necessary build two pony walls that can be joined by a gate. On the other hand, cost out whether two pony walls would cost more than a good, attractive gate -- the kind with a swinging door for people.