Tonya Diehl
Tonya Diehl
  • Hometalker
  • Murphysboro, IL

Side Yard Makeover: Creating Curb Appeal


Our side yard is a space that I've been working on for the last couple of years. It seems like each spring I tackle it again & again, making more progress year after year. A few weeks ago, I decided to finally put in the work (and the money) needed, to make it the side yard of my dreams! I'm so happy with how it turned out. Details in link below!
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, Here is a look at the side yard just a couple years ago It was more of an eyesore than anything else and definitely lacked curb appeal
Here is a look at the side yard just a couple years ago. It was more of an eyesore than anything else and definitely lacked curb appeal.
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, Here is a look at where I started this year
Here is a look at where I started this year.
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, And here is a look at our side yard today Quite the improvement right In addition to the landscaping we also added shutters and a window box to the window to add even more curb appeal
And here is a look at our side yard today. Quite the improvement, right?! In addition to the landscaping, we also added shutters and a window box to the window to add even more curb appeal.
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, The first thing I did was pull all the weeds prepared the area for landscaping Once the weeds were removed I could finally see my hostas that I had planted just a couple years back
The first thing I did was pull all the weeds & prepared the area for landscaping. Once the weeds were removed, I could finally see my hostas that I had planted just a couple years back.
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, To prevent further problems with weeds I put down a weed control fabric covered the area with mulch Then I went to Lowes and purchased some stone edgers to put the finishing touches on the landscaping
To prevent further problems with weeds, I put down a weed control fabric & covered the area with mulch. Then I went to Lowe's and purchased some stone edgers to put the finishing touches on the landscaping.
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, The hostas have grown matured so much in a matter of weeks They really do well on this side of our home because it is shaded for the biggest part of the day
The hostas have grown & matured so much in a matter of weeks. They really do well on this side of our home because it is shaded for the biggest part of the day.
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, In addition to the hostas I usually plant impatiens as well Like the hostas they also thrive in the shade I love the color they bring to the side of the house
In addition to the hostas, I usually plant impatiens as well. Like the hostas, they also thrive in the shade. I love the color they bring to the side of the house.
side yard makeover creating curb appeal, curb appeal, gardening, landscape, Here is a one last look at the space as a whole I m so happy with how it turned out and I m looking forward to watching the plants fill out mature even more in the coming weeks
Here is a one last look at the space as a whole. I'm so happy with how it turned out and I'm looking forward to watching the plants fill out & mature even more in the coming weeks!

Resources for this project:

IMPATIENS NEW GUINEA SUPER SONIC RED - LIVE PLANTS - STARTERS -...
See all materials
Any price and availability information displayed on [relevant Amazon Site(s), as applicable] at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.
Hometalk may collect a small share of sales from the links on this page. More info
Tonya Diehl

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

Go

Have a question about this project?

28 questions
  • Valerie
    on Apr 5, 2016

    what kind of green plant is that and can I find it in MD

    • Rikki
      on Apr 25, 2016

      Along the back that is a hosta.

    • Jill Ron Pike
      on May 2, 2016

      Valerie you can find them in MD. Try Home Depot in Waldorf, or one of the nurseries in the area. I lived in Accokeek for years, and they do really well there.

    • ARJazzLass
      on May 3, 2016

      Hosta

    • Lynda
      on May 3, 2016

      I have had very good results ordering Hostas (some are BOGO) from an online Co. Gilbert H. Wild and Son.

  • Amanda W
    on May 2, 2016

    Since hosta and impatiens both are summer plants, what do you plant for winter?

    • Diane
      on May 3, 2016

      I'm guessing she doesn't have to plant anything as it would all be covered with snow.

    • Amanda W
      on May 3, 2016

      Good guess, Diane! Living in the deep south, I don't have to deal with snow and didn't think about that. Thanks!

    • Carol
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Hostas last all yr here n have to be devidedin the spring. I usually cut back my impatients to the grnd. after they die off and the seed will fall off and come back each yr.

      CAG

  • Tula
    on May 2, 2016

    Are hostas good for south florida?

    • Col11183351
      on Sep 13, 2017

      I never see them here in Ft Myers
    • Ellis
      on Apr 4, 2018

      Hostas need a bit of chill each winter, a period of time at 40 degrees or below, so they probably won't do well in South Florida. But you could grow a particularly gorgeous one in a pot, and dig it out and give it a winter chilling in the fridge, the same way we northerners have to bring in delicate bulbs and roots over winter.


      Check the Cooperative Extension site at the University of Florida, they may know of hostas that will grow in warm climates.

    • Pam7481519
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I think the variety is “gold standard “ I have planted in southern Alabama - supposed to be able to withstand the warm temps and return next year w/o hard freeze(I’m hoping)

  • Christel
    on May 30, 2016

    What a lovely side yard you created. It's beautiful. I love hostas and impatiens. Unfortunately the deer love them also - we call them deer candy. Any suggestions for plants that are deer proof and are attractive year round. I want it all and I don't want to use the deer repellant spray.

    • Kathy Peterson
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I was thinking the same thing-suggestions for something less like deer candy


    • Ie128501833
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Not all hostas - the variety shown here are fine with deer. I used to have a variety but they eliminated the pretty green and white striped ones...

    • Carol
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Look on line n u can find a list of plants deer won't eat. Sev animals eat garden plants, rabbits etc.

      CAG

    • Jeanette S
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I have deer also and have to share our hostas too! I checked on line and here is a list of what they suggest. Come to think of it, I have never had the eat my daffodils! And they never bother my iris or day lilies. But only the day lilies last for any length of time.


      But I will warn you, rabbits love Salvia!!!!


      "Daffodils, foxgloves, monkshood, and poppies are common flowers that have a toxicity that deer avoid. Deer turn their noses up at fragrant plants with strong scents. Herbs such as sages, ornamental salvias, lavenders, peonies, and bearded irises are among these “stinky” plants that deer tend to avoid."

    • Web15465597
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I read that spraying vegetation with vinegar will help keep the critters at bay. They hate the smell.

    • Nyc7439121
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Go to your local garden center,they will be happy to help you.. There are many plants deer safe.

    • Ern25754787
      on Jun 30, 2018

      There is s product called Liquid Fence.

      Spray it around you plants or garden to keep the deer out. Works great.

    • Pam7481519
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Agree on liquid fence, not that much of a problem to use (once a month?) to be able to grow what you want!

    • The8310840
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Liquid Fence works for my plants too!


    • Tlo33531983
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Irish Spring soap shavings around your Hostas will help keep deer away.

    • Janet
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Yes they do. Mine was looking great one day and gone the next.

    • Janet
      on Jun 30, 2018

      What is liquid fence? Between rabbits and groundhogs my garden is disappearing fast.

    • Sue Sanders
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I sprinkle black pepper (cheap kind) around my plants to keep rabbits, squirrels and cats away from my plants and potted porch plants. Before I did this I had diggings and pecan trees coming up in my pots.





  • Drp6249295
    on Jun 30, 2018

    Gorgeous! But a quick question: Is the gate mounted backwards?

    The slanted support beam should not be showing from the street.

    Re: Flower questions: Impatiens are annuals in most regions. Hostas will die back to the ground in early Fall and reappear in Spring. Be sure to remove all dead vegetation during Fall cleanup.

    Depending upon your location, think about planting fall-blooming Crocus among the plants in August and pansies or, if you have snow, Arctic Pansies in October-November or late March-early April.

    They will die back with the heat. Remove the debris as your Hostas

    reappear, and replace the pansies with new Impatiens. Have fun!

    • Web15465597
      on Jun 30, 2018

      In regards to your question about the gate, if you look closely, the gate is actually open and you’re looking at the backside.

    • Barb
      on Jun 30, 2018

      It's not showing from the street.

  • Susan
    on Jun 30, 2018

    This is beautiful. Will those plants also grow well in Tennessee? We have all 4 seasons and sometimes get snow, not always but sometimes.

    • Liz
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Hostas usually do well in 4 season climates. Mine thrive here in Western NC, so you should be ok. Impatiens are annuals and you will have to plant them each year, but if you research perennial groundcovers you may find short, colorful plants that you like that would work in front of the Hostas. Spring bulbs are nice, too, as the hostas will cover up the dormant foliage as the season progresses.

    • J Neal
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I live in the mountains of north Georgia and hostas do very well here. They die back in the winter and reemerge each spring. Pansies and violas bloom well into winter. A nice bit of color when everything else has died back. You can shred a strong smelling soap (Irish Spring), or plant citronella to keep the deer away.


    • JudyH
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Both plants thrive in Alabama. Be sure to plant in the shade.

    • Beckie
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Yes! You can also plant some Astilbe behind the hostas for tall colors. They are a shade plant and come in 5-6 colors And they’re Perennial!

    • Sandra Ross Warren
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I live in Upstate NY and Hostas thrive here.

    • Amy
      on Jun 30, 2018

      You can get the impatients to come back if you are patient. They have little seed pods that you can pop, and then put a layer of leaves over the top of the area, after the Indian Summer seems to be over. In the spring, put a light layer of mulch on top of the leaves and then they will begin to grow. Most people disagree but mine came back every year and were much taller then the new plants. If it doesn't work for you, you haven't lost anything. You can replant then. When weeding look for the small leaves that look like impatients.

    • Susan
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Omg thank you guys for answering. I feel my yard is dull but may turn out being beautiful.

  • Melinda Lockwood
    on Jun 30, 2018

    Nice! How do you keep the deer from eating the hosta? I have planted them several,times but the deer find out every time!

    • Cindy
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Instead of hostas, look for deer resistant plants. But my landscape design friend, always said if deer are hungry, they well eat pretty much everything.

    • Janice Ericson
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Just saw this above.

      You can shred a strong smelling soap (Irish Spring), or plant citronella to keep the deer away.


    • Kat22094991
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I got so tired of the deer eating my plants, I ordered fake azalea plants from amazon. They look great and they were very reasonable. I love hostas but so do the deer.

    • Pam Ladds
      on Jun 30, 2018

      hosta is salad! no way around it. Plant deer resistant shade plants instead. Iris, day lilies, astilbe etc.


    • Madeline OBrien Edmunds
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Good luck with those deer. They just ate the top half of a plastic-coated sign that the arborist had posted n and our backyard when he applied a fungicide to our crabapple tree😯

    • JoAnn
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Get some Milorganite fertilizer and spread it around the plants. The deer hate the smell. It is cheap and for 8$ it solves the problem. Wal-Mart carries it.

    • Mary williams
      on Jul 4, 2018

      Sorry but Iris and daylilies are not shade plants - they grow in full sun.

    • Kim Tolbert-Vanstavern
      on Jul 7, 2018

      They ate the hell out of my day lilies


  • Jess
    on Jun 30, 2018

    Great! I live in Orlando, Fl and my backyard has sun most of the day, what foliage would you recommend ?

  • Kelli Cameron Campbell
    on Jun 30, 2018

    I can't keep grass and weeds from coming up thru the landscaping fabric. Help!

  • Carol
    on Jun 30, 2018

    I live in arizonia do hosta grow well in extreme hot weather. I don’t want to use mulch because they cause mold and bugs any other suggestions. Ty. Carol

  • Jette
    on Jun 30, 2018

    will those plants grow in Florida? We have two sides of our house that are mostly in the shade all gay long.

    if those won’t work, do you know what will?

    • Anonymous
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Bromiliads, dendrobuims, elephant ears, caladuims — all work pretty well in the shade in Florida.

    • Laurie
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Yes hostas love shade as well as the impatients....they are drought tolerant as well..good luck

    • Debra Kemp
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Hostas and inpatients don’t do real well in the heat.

      in Florida there are very few plants that won’t grow. If you have a local nursury they should should have a wealth of knowledge and love to share. I was amazed at how much the ladies knew at the hardware store. I’m sure you have them. One has orange signs, one has blue. If in doubt all of the info is on the tags.

      I think your a zone 9. The tag will say USDA zone 6-9 or my area 2-5 something like that.

    • Nancy
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Really just beautful!

    • Diana Deiley
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I live in Nokomis on the Gulf side and enjoy the beautiful Oyster Palm. It's a deep purple and green plant that blooms small white buds. I love it.

    • Joannie
      on Jul 1, 2018

      I finally got verigated hosts to grow in the Tampa area...they only get morning sun. This is my second year for them and they look great.

  • Sue Sanders
    on Jun 30, 2018

    It is very pretty and great design. Just asking if you added an extention on your gutter downspout to keep from flooding your flower bed or washing out the mulch.?

    • Mar22315716
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I thought the same thing, Sue.


    • Ft.29298732
      on Jun 30, 2018

      Great question! It is very pretty and I love the ideas I get from “window shopping on phone”!;) I will have questions down the road because I am returning to my original little house w/o steps, and more my size. I will share later. It’s far too late to start a novel today! 🌺

    • Cwa31876106
      on Jun 30, 2018

      For extending rain gutters in your flower bed, there are plastic extensions you can buy. Some are rubber you can get at hardware-nursery stores, or some of the fold-out kind you can get from a catalog. The fold-out kind is suppose to roll out, by itself when it rains, and rolls up by itself when done. They also have little holes that will sprinkle the area beyond (lawn) your planting bed. Haven't tried them myself, but will soon. Did see some ideas with a small hole & drain cover over it, etc. on-line.

    • Linda Premo
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I had the same question about the rain gutter and water runoff. I haven't seen the roll out extension at Home Depot. It sounds great. The side yard really looks good. Such a nice improvement. Perhaps better anchors or brackets for the flower boxes would improve the look of them appearing to be about to fall off. The splash of colorful plants is lovely.

    • Linda Premo
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I had the same question about the rain gutter and water runoff. I haven't seen the roll out extension at Home Depot. It sounds great. The side yard really looks good. Such a nice improvement. Perhaps better anchors or brackets for the flower boxes would improve the look of them appearing to be about to fall off. The splash of colorful plants is lovely.

    • Linda Premo
      on Jun 30, 2018

      I had the same question about the rain gutter and water runoff. I haven't seen the roll out extension at Home Depot. It sounds great. The side yard really looks good. Such a nice improvement. Perhaps better anchors or brackets for the flower boxes would improve the look of them appearing to be about to fall off. The splash of colorful plants is lovely.

  • Anthony
    on Jun 30, 2018

    very nice ..just one question, its obvious next to your home so what happens to your foundation with the watering that one has to keep doing besides the weather to maintain the plants?

  • Bonnie
    on Jul 1, 2018

    why are new guinea impatients, flame red, listed on the materials list when the photo shows regular impatients and not new guinea? and not red, mostly pink




  • Jud27448980
    on Jul 1, 2018

    Great new look. How did you manage weed barrier cloth with hostas thatbwere already planted ?

    • Karen Nethery Alves
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I’ve actually done this wth existing plants. I cut a slit in the fabric, from the edge, and sort of wrapped it around the base of the plant, then trimmed a little so it didn’t stick up above the plant base. It was a lot of work, but so worth it. It’s been several years and still no weeds!

  • Chilly661
    on Jul 1, 2018

    You definately made a big change, nice job. I would only say that the tilted window box should be leveled. I like the addition of the shutters. Did you add them to the whole house or just here?

    • Sheila
      on Jul 2, 2018

      The shutters were already there but you're right about fixing the window box

  • Cindi J
    on Jul 1, 2018

    Can you suggest something that will thrive in hot Mississippi full sun!

    • Dmotan
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Google for your zone and you can find all types of perennials which will love your Mississippi sun. I'm not strong on annuals.

    • Dmotan
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Cindi - Just beautiful. I don't recommend weed control cloth as when the mulch breaks down it becomes soil and the weeds grow in it. Also, your hostas will want to spread and if the hole isn't big enough where your hostas are planted, they won't be able to spread.

      We pulled up a lot of the weed cloth and the perennials really did so much better.


    • Mary williams
      on Jul 4, 2018

      You are very right about the landscape cloth, this from a retired landscaper. We used to encourage people not to use it for that very reason. She hasn't had weeds because the hostas have gotten big enough to shade them out. She also needs to move the whole bed out, including the hostas, so they aren't up against the house. She will be having mildew and mold problems on the side of the house. These suggestions will make a beautiful bed even more beautiful!

    • D fuhrman
      on Jul 4, 2018

      i would check out my neighbors yards to see what does well around their homes.


    • Lucy Luu
      on Jul 8, 2018

      Since seeing this is spoke with family, uncle says can use newspaper for weed barrier and it breaks down, could that be possibly?


  • Teresa Rothell Bonilla
    on Jul 6, 2018

    It's it's beautiful my question is on the side of your house looks like in front you put some bricks the below your siding what I wanted to know is how did you do that I have a house that is over a hundred years old they added a room and the house has vinyl siding so does the extra room but water leaks in through the bottom where they did not do the siding right I guess so I want to take off like 4 pieces of siding maybe 5 and redo that right there with the bricks like you have I'm 60 years old disabled have no man in my house so I need to do it myself please please I would love to know how you did that

    • Cheryl Mcclary
      on Jul 7, 2018

      I also saw this. I found this ,I hope this will help answer some of your questions. YouTube: How to install stone veneer siding. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2y7tExT6EJI ( the last letter is a capital i ). There are more videos on YouTube that give other directions. This is just one. Hope this gets you started.

    • Mon Edwards
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Hi.

      Could it be the sill plate that is the cause of the leak?

      Because you are a dissbled senior try calling your local United Way. They will likely be able to connect you with people who can help you with what you need for your home.

  • Elayne Powell
    on Jul 7, 2018

    I absolutely love this idea I would love to do something on the same lines ..but as I live in a council ground floor flat there isn’t much I can do,any advice would be much appreciated. Elayne.

    • Cheryl Mcclary
      on Jul 7, 2018

      You can purchase window flower box clamp-on brackets. These allow you to put up temporary flower boxes. They can be removed if you move. There also is hooks that attach to siding as well as bricks that allow you to hang things. One of these products would allow you to hang the window shudders. As far as the flower garden, you could use planters. There's so many types of planters out there, but if you don't see what you like you can find directions on line on how to make your own. Then everything is movable. Although some places if you talk to them will let you make improvements at your cost. I hope this helps you get started. Good luck.

    • Kim Smith
      on Jul 7, 2018

      If you have any green space, you should be able to use it at you will. Even grow your own tomatoes, but hosts a come back every year, the inpatients unfortunately do not. They have to be replaced yearly. Ask the front office. Good luck, happy gardening 😁

  • Lucy Luu
    on Jul 7, 2018

    What did you use up against the t of the house? Did you get some sort of vapor barrier, and the downspout there did you connect with something to use for watering of the plants? Looks just like the side of my home so would really love to use this idea.

  • Mary Draper
    on Jul 7, 2018

    Wt can I do to my plain front porch ,love I the country and I have flowers in my yard out front,any ideas!

  • Karen
    on Jul 7, 2018

    I’m not a gardener, so did you put the weed barrier down after you put the plants in or after?

    • Christine Evans
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Before you put plants in. Probably put around the hosta scence they were already in!

    • Lori Pandolfino
      on Jul 7, 2018

      O always put a weed barrier down first and then wherever you want a plant cut a hole, dig out the fertilized dirt and plant Be sure to space them properly.

    • Fern Gieselman
      on Jul 7, 2018

      I have gardened for over 40 years. I have learned that a fabric weed barrier is not a good idea. It just is a major problem when plants get bigger and you need to split them. Also, and the biggy, as your mulch breaks down and decomposes it turns into nutritious rich soil to feed your plants. This will be on top of the weed barrier. If you put a thick enough covering of mulch it will keep most of the weeds down. Any weeds that do come up should be pulled as one weed can produce thousands of seeds and will love to grow in the rich soil that has developed on top of the weed barrier.

    • Carol Simpson Fowler
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Newspaper is another great weed barrier. Apply about 4 pages thick.

  • Theresa Walker-Wible
    on Jul 7, 2018

    I would like to do the same thing but I get sun from sunrise to early afternoon. What plants/flowers could I use that would work?

    • Tara Hardy Gourley
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Vincas are very similar to Impatiens but love sun.

    • Rhonda S
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Plant selection is specific to area and site. If you are in the US, call or visit your local USDA extension office and they can give you a wealth of information. Most garden centers will do the same, but may have limited time to give you or recommend that which they carry over some other better choices. A landscape consultant will do the same service, but for a fee. The extention program was set up to help farmers and gardeners in specific locations and they have well informed and helpful people who really know your location. In the link, click on our state to find local resources. Here is a link to finding your extention agent: https://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/locator/app

    • Lisa
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Hostas will still work and vincas. You'd have an almost identical look.

    • Chuck N Karla Beaulieu
      on Jul 7, 2018

      No wonder my vincas aren't doing good I have them in the shade. I thought they were a shade plant. Now I can transfer them to my side yard where the sun hits



    • Laurie T
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Theresa, there are impatience plants that LOVE sun! They're called Sunpatience and grow beautifully in the sun.

      As far as growing hostas in the sun, just make sure that they are the light colored leaves (lime green, yellow, etc). Or you can plant variegated leaf hostas as well.

      Don't get dark green leaves or solid green for your location because they probably won't make it.

      Just remember:

      Dark green or Solid green leaves - Mostly Shade

      Variegated to Light leaves - Shade or Sun

      Light leaves - Some Shade or Mostly Light

      Also, newspaper is a wonderful weed barrier to use, the more you use, the better the weed barrier (of course cover it with mulch to make it look pretty!) One thing you need to make sure of though...make sure your newspaper uses Soy Ink and NOT a petroleum based ink. Otherwise, newspaper (and lots of it) is the way to go!

      Organic, cheap, and highly available!


      I hope this helps!!

    • Susan
      on Jul 7, 2018

      My hostas are in sun and do very well as do yellow day lilies. They need to be divided every other year so space accordingly. You’ll get a lot of plants from these 2 selections so add to other garden areas or trade with neighbors in spring or fall. I’m in zone 5

  • Ricardo
    on Jul 7, 2018

    Very nice job. What was the total cost for this project?

    • Cynthia MacDonald
      on Jul 7, 2018

      This wasn't my project, but I've built walls to surround my house. It depends on the type of retaining material you use, how high, and how long the area is. These edgers run between 10" and 12" and are usually less than $2 each..

    • Melody Rice
      on Jul 7, 2018

      I live in Pennsylvania and have hostas planted everywhere. On all sides of the house.


  • Ivon
    on Jul 7, 2018

    Is this on the east, south or north side of the house??


    • Denise
      on Jul 7, 2018

      Sun rises in east, sets in west you get full sun in south so it would be the north side. Hope this helps

    • Sue Cleland
      on Jul 7, 2018

      most likely the north or south. The sun comes up in the east, sets in the west so they're hotter and sunnier.


    • Allison Newby
      on Jul 7, 2018

      This is how my home sits and yep the north side has great rich soil and shade for days not a lot of grass but I'm super stoked to get some gorgeous hostas to make it look lush and fabulous instead of lost and forgotten. Thanks for the inspiration! 👍💕😁😊

    • Sandra
      on Jul 7, 2018

      I had hostas on the west side of my house in Michigan. They were fine. No shade till after 1 or 2. It would not work in the south though. Shoot I can’t raise them in Florida in the shade.

  • Meme303
    on Jul 7, 2018

    What does a person do to keep the bricks level?

    • Cynthia MacDonald
      on Jul 7, 2018

      It really depends on how much work you want to put into it and the type os wall you are going to lay. If you have a relatively flat area and you do a short one like this, you can just beat down the disturbed dirt with tamper. If you use the bigger blocks, you probably would be better off getting small stones or paver sand, tamping it down, and checking it with a level. Getting it level is more important if you will have multiple layers of stones. Once you get it about right, and lay your stones, I'd recommend doing the fine tuning with a rubber mallet. There are some great videos on youtube and home depot for ideas.

    • Stevie Johnson
      on Jul 8, 2018

      I you are where it freezes & thaws, the only sure way is to dig down below frost line, put in a footing, lay a cheaper block or brick to ground level, or fill w/ concrete -keeping all of this level to lay your brck on. Lots of work & lots more money.

      Truly, if you are going to just make your brick a course or as much as 3 courses high-about one foot, it really won't matter much if it is perfectly level or not. By the time your plants mature, w/ grass growing in front of it, you won't see enough of it to worry about. If you lay it out just following the ground, you can get an idea how it will look. If it pleases you, you are done. If not, dig out dirt to lower it, fill in more dirt to raise it.

      There is a middle ground. Dig a trench at least a foot deep. I would make it at least as wide as my brick, plus enough extra to be able to run a lawnmower beside the brick so i could mow & not have to hand trim. Use a level to get floor of trench level removing or adding diet as needed. Tamp the dirt, or simply walk on it. Line w/ weed stopping "fabric". Fill w/ pea gravel. The idea is to provide drainage & some "give" so freezing & thawing don't heave your bricks as much. Tamp the gravel. If you did a good job, you just have to put your bricks in at, or a bit below ground level. Tamp them too & check w/ the level as you go.

      One more idea. Use the Retaining Wall landscape brick. It is a lot heavier, more stable due to the weight & they lock together. Peel up the sod that would be under them. I would again make it wide enough to mow & then a few inches more so I could mulch that area & install a strip of the grass stop edging outside my planting bed. Level the dirt where you want them. Put a strip of the weed stop flabric under the block. You can trim it close w/a razir knife such as a sheetrock knife after you get finished. Those block are heavy enough to hold still while you work. I built 2 round planters to put Pygmy palms in. Just 2 courses high. Kids of all ages loved to walk on them. They never moved. Very soliid & sturdy. Price each is likely going To be higher than many brick, but it can figure out as cheap or cheaper because of their size. 2 sizes. I used the larger one. There are several colors, too.

      The following from a big box store, but they are stocked in many garden centers, too.

      Pavestone 4 in. x 11.75 in. x 6.75 in. River Red Concrete Retaining Wall Block


      https://www.homedepot.com/p/Pavestone-4-in-x-11-75-in-x-6-75-in-River-Red-Concrete-Retaining-Wall-Block-81151/100333174

  • Luerettia Mack
    on Jul 7, 2018

    When and how to apply the weed control fabric

  • Laurie Hummel
    on Jul 7, 2018

    What can I plant for full sun

    • Glenna Jeani Spicer-Adams
      on Jul 8, 2018

      Sweet potato vine thrives in the sun, grows fast and has beautiful color.

    • Sheila Mount
      on Jul 8, 2018

      Roses & Iris

    • Debbie Torino
      on Jul 8, 2018

      Yoh have given me inspiration to do our side yard.

    • Mary Kelly
      on Jul 8, 2018

      My sweet potato vines were simply beautiful and added definition to our landscaping. The only problem was that the deer thought it was a buffet. No more sweet potato vines

    • Tammy Stephens
      on Jul 8, 2018

      Absolutely absolutely beautiful and you inspired me to get my side yard thank you and God bless

    • Jocelyn Joyce Brown-Fort
      on Jul 8, 2018

      Just sprinkle some Irish 🍀 spring soap shavings around the base of your floor beds.

      I mix it with Moth balls & Cayanne pepper 🌶 for the Molds 🐻🐻

Join the conversation

2 of 174 comments
Your comment...