Linda Dann
Linda Dann
  • Hometalker
  • Glassboro, NJ
Asked on Jun 6, 2013

Fungus? Can't Identify in Front and Back of My Garden

John RicchezzaElaine CoiaEL Hoard
+8

Answered

found several of these phallic looking things in the ground near my mailbox and in a flower bed in the back yard- anyone know what the heck these are?
q fungus can t identify in front and back of my garden, flowers, gardening
q fungus can t identify in front and back of my garden, flowers, gardening
11 answers
  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jun 6, 2013

    If they are also quite odiferous, they are probably stinkhorns of one type or another.

  • Linda Dann
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Neighbor of mind confirmed! Now apparently, I must rid myself of these alien fungi! only they're around my plants! Thanks.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Jun 7, 2013

    These are the "fruiting bodies" when conditions are right these spring up from the larger and more wide spread "net" of myceli. Just pull them out as soon as you see them, this way they will not mature and produce more spore.

  • Linda Dann
    on Jun 7, 2013

    Oh thanks- I left them there! Out I go~

  • Linda Dann
    on Jun 7, 2013

    If I did not get them or all of them- is there something I can put into soil to get rid of them and not everything else?

  • Judy
    on Jun 7, 2013

    I have read that if you pick them it only prompts the mycelium under the surface to produce more...sort of like picking green beans to keep the crop coming. Consensus seems to be that you can only hope they consume the last of whatever they're feeding on & go away. There will be people who tell you to use salt &/or vinegar to get rid of them, both of which are not good for the soil. Vinegar acidifies the soil & salt will have a detrimental effect on any other plants you put there.

  • Linda Dann
    on Jun 7, 2013

    Well, thanks- never picked them anyway- and now that I know their name I too looked them up and apparently- they aren't a threat to the plants- they tend to come from soil that's been enriched and mulched- (always a down side) and they die on their own-So for now- I guess I'll just leave the stinkhorns to do what they do- and hope that the smell doesn't overwhelm.

  • EL Hoard
    on Feb 16, 2015

    Linda, we had these for several years as we were establishing our garden, especially as fresh hardwood mulch was put down. They never harmed any of our plants, and each one only lasts a few days before they release their spore, shrivel up and die. The foul oder is prevalent only when they are active. We have not had any in years after our Vinca Minor ground cover became established. The dins tincture Oder can be picked up within a few yards of the fungi and last year I followed the Oder to a full blown plant in my neighbor's yard. I had my own pet name for these little guys because of their anatomical appearance, so that and the order made it easy to find, but will just leave it at that. I posted pictures of it on the Internet, hoping that someone would be able to tell me what the actual name was, but no one would touch it. No pun intended.

  • Elaine Coia
    on Sep 19, 2016

    I had them in NJ in an area where i'd put some mulch. The mulch apparently was contaminated. I had to keep digging them out so it took a while but i finally got rid of them all.

  • John Ricchezza
    on Sep 19, 2016

    Not sure if this is mycelium but if so I've found the only way to get rid of it is the strip away all of the mulch. Once the mulch is gone keep the soil wet but don't put down new mulch for a week or two. This will give the plants in you bed some time to breath while making the condition of you bed unsuitable for any fungus to grow. When adding new mulch keep it thin and Moist. Add more mulch before Frost but mix it and break it up in the spring. Try not to keep adding layer after layer or the fungus will come back.

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