Debra Peters
Debra Peters
  • Hometalker
  • Mesa, AZ
Asked on Jun 6, 2013

Something Wrong With My Tomatos

Brendan PoynterDebra PetersVicki
+20

Answered

Can anyone tell me what the problem is with these tomatos? The small one is a roma, the other is a heatmaster - two different varieties. Other fruit on the same plants are fine. What caused this and how do I avoid it in the future? Thanks!!
something wrong with my tomatos, gardening
22 answers
  • Tracey
    on Jun 6, 2013

    this looks like Blossom End Rot-classic tomato problem. Causes are usually due to inconsistent watering and causes it to have a calcium deficinecy in the plant as it grows. use a search engine online for lots of helpful tips and ideas for the future!

  • Linda Battreall
    on Jun 6, 2013

    My thought was blossom end rot, also.

  • Rosemary N
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Blossom end rot. You need to take a tsp or so of epsom salts and dissolve it in a gallon of water. Water with that solution. Your plants need magnesium. Also a few crushed egg shells scratched into the soil wouldn't be a bad idea either, for the calcium.

  • Jean Eickhoff
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Definitely blossom end rot. Local nurseries will have a product to spray if the "home remedies" don't work for you.

  • D Burton
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Use Corn starch on all of your tomato plants to resist disease and pests.

  • Brendan Poynter
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Hi Debra, Everyone here is right. It is Blossom End Rot. I had this problem with my Roma tomatoes. You need to look at your tomato plants as they begin to sprout their fruit, I would suggest this daily considering the budding of the little yellow flowers. If you see that the flower has not completely fallen away from the baby fruit, you will want to remove it by hand then. Epsom salt solution will help the plant become more bountiful with tomatoes and a lot greener and leafier.

  • Barb King
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Yes it is blossom end rot, caused by a lack of calcuim in the soil, to much or to little water at certain times, they need to stay evenly moist. I plant roughly 40-50 tomatoes plants and add crushed egg shells to hole when planting, also some recommend Tums.

  • Judy
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Blossom end rot....caused by lack of calcium in the soil. I save my egg shells. let them dry out & run them through my food processor. At planting time I work it into the soil of the whole tomato bed or you can put 3 or 4 crushed eggshells into the planting hole for each tomato or you can just go buy bonemeal.

  • Janice Rutherford Cannon
    on Jun 6, 2013

    For Blossom end rot, you can also crush 2 Tums and water your plant

  • Jackie Gandy
    on Jun 6, 2013

    when you plant your tomato plants add a cupful of lime to the soil that you back fill with.

    • Jack Khoury
      on Jul 5, 2014

      @Jackie Gandy Lime is good but can change the Ph quite a bit. If you use gypsum instead you will get the calcium without changing the Ph.

  • Michelle W
    on Jun 6, 2013

    Ditto on the Blossom end rot. Inconsistent watering can also contribute to problems. We always go by the advise of "only water when the plants are wilted in the AM". Tomato plants will look wilted during the heat of the day but usually recover in the evening. If however, you see them already wilted in the AM, before the sun hits, then they need water. Once we really paid attention to the wilting, we had better tomatoes. One year we hardly had to water at all and we are in So California.

  • Gigles Bonno
    on Jun 7, 2013

    also, when you empty your milk jugs, put some water in them, about 1/4 full, swish around, and water your tomatoes with the "milky water" .

  • JeDonne M
    on Jun 7, 2013

    It doesn't have to be Tums brand, just calcium. I had the same problem, gave each plant a calcium tablet and voila!

  • Jossi
    on Jun 8, 2013

    ZOMBIE INVASION !!!!! Or, End rot. YOU decide. :)

  • Judy
    on Jun 8, 2013

    Do NOT add lime to the soil as Jackie Gandy suggests unless you have a VERY high acid soil to begin with! Lime is for adjusting the Ph of the soil & should not be added unless a Ph test indicates that it's needed. Your tomatoes need calcium & ground up Tums or calcium pills might work well. I've never tried them but it does make sense.

  • Island Products
    on Jun 8, 2013

    I put 4 tums in a gallon of water, dissolved it and watered my tomato plants last year, and problem was gone in two weeks

  • Vicki
    on Jun 8, 2013

    cool abt tums adding to the water. that is new to me!

  • Debra Peters
    on Jun 9, 2013

    Thanks to everyone for the info about blossom end rot. I have bone meal in my shed, so I guess I will start there.... but, why would it only affect one fruit on each of these two plants, while all other fruit is just fine?

  • Brendan Poynter
    on Jun 9, 2013

    Hi Debra, as I said in my earlier posting "the flower has not completely fallen away from the baby fruit" Sometimes the buds on the tomato fruit just do not fall or pop off when they reach a certain size. It never affects the whole bunch of tomatoes, just the one fruit that doesn't get the flower off in time for it to completely wilt or rot. Which is where the manual deflowering (you) come in.

  • Debra Peters
    on Jun 9, 2013

    Brendan - Thanks for reposting! I must have missed it when i was reading the other posts. (We've been gone camping for 3 days, so I've been playing catch up) What you've said makes sense to me - especially since I've only had two tomatoes affected out of many more. We have eight tomato plants and only these two have been affected - so I guess I've had pretty good luck so far! Thanks, again, to everyone for all your help!

  • Brendan Poynter
    on Jun 11, 2013

    Got to love them tomatoes! What to look for!!

    , Here is what to look for Debra and those who are curious about Blossom End Rot This roma still has it s flower rotting in the fruit, And here you can see that the tomato is still in good condition after I had pinched off the rot Nice health roma with a dimple
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