Eulalia
Eulalia
  • Hometalker
  • South Boston, VA
Asked on Apr 29, 2012

A question about a plant.

Linda JamisonDORLISWanda sinnema
+58

Answered

A lady approached me at Lowe's a few month ago as I was looking at some houseplants and asked me if I wanted some. She was remodeling a room and needed all the houseplants gone. I jumped at the offer. She gave me what looks like an Iris plant but now two of the leaves have grown babies at the tip almost like a spider plant. I put the babies in the soil and now they have rooted. Any one know what type of plant this could be?
q a question about a plant, gardening
q a question about a plant, gardening
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q a question about a plant, gardening
54 answers
  • Eulalia
    on Apr 30, 2012

    I will post a picture tomorrow, I have it outside on the back deck and it's dark out.

  • Eulalia
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Here are the pictures of the "Iris" plant.

    q a question about a plant, gardening, Here is a pic of the plantq a question about a plant, gardening, This is one of the babies with rootsq a question about a plant, gardeningq a question about a plant, gardening, The is the other baby
    • Mae Garrels
      on Oct 15, 2017

      I think you have a Fortnight Lily!!!!! The small ones convinced me. This is a nice plant. It comes in white with purple parts in center, also comes in yellow with tan parts in center. It is a great grower and will get to be a nice size plant. Very easy to remove side shoots to start new plants. I have it in several places around my property. It is used here in California around in shopping centers because it does not take a lot of care, probably. I've never put it in pots, it does wonderfully well in the ground, seems to like both sun and shade. I saw it first around apartments in San Diego, I thought the blossoms looked a little like orchids!
  • Tina H
    on Apr 30, 2012

    I have a plant just like it. Was given to me by mother-in-law many years ago. She just told me it was a spider plant. Maybe there are different varieties, but I don't know its 'real' name. Sorry, thats the best I can do - good luck :)

  • Carol Ann S
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Spider Plant - Chlorophytum comosum

  • Gloria D
    on Apr 30, 2012

    This is correct, I have always heard it called a spider plant

  • Jo G
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Looks like the plant called "walking Iris". Family: Iridaceae (eye-rid-AY-see-ee) (Info) Genus: Neomarica (nee-oh-mar-EE-kuh) (Info) Species: gracilis (GRASS-il-is) Category: Tropicals and Tender Perennials Height: 18-24 in. (45-60 cm) Spacing: 18-24 in. (45-60 cm) Hardiness: USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F) USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F) USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F) USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F) USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F) USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F) USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F) Sun Exposure: Sun to Partial Shade Light Shade Partial to Full Shade Danger: All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested Bloom Color: Light Blue White/Near White Bloom Time: Mid Sp

  • Terri S
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Tis indeed a spider plant of the non varigated variety

  • Kim M
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Spider Plant : )

  • Nancy G
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Spider Plant

  • Leslie D
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Yep, Spider Plant...and the baby "spiders" on the ends can easily be rooted and made into another plant.

  • Nan W
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Agree w/ Jo G - 'Walking Iris' - Neomarica gracilis.

  • Leah R
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Blooms during Easter time.

  • Val L
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Don't spider plants send out "tendrils" for the babies? I've never seen one with babies attached to the leaves

    • Mae Garrels
      on Oct 15, 2017

      you are right.....spider plants send out long shoots and the babies form at the ends of those......some shoots do not get as long as others so they may look like they are on the leaves but they are not, if you look closely, the plantlets are on a stem or shoot of their own. There are several varieties of this plant. Solid green. Green leaves with white or cream streaks, cream leaves with green streaks -yes, they are different!! All grow well either inside or outside here where I live. They may die back some where it gets cold but once the weather warms up, they recover from the roots up! I have several large potted plants of the stripped variety and they are quite pretty when they get lots of runners with small plants on them. I do have some in places where I do not want the runners, so I just keep those cut off. Once the runners are allowed to grow, the mother plant sometimes looses it's appeal to me, that's why I cut off the runners on some of my plants. If they are allowed to grow and make the runners, they need a lot of room and are beautiful in hanging baskets.
  • Kelli E
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Spider plant is a little more droopy and a slightly less dark shade of green. I'd go with the walking iris. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/125028/

    • Mae Garrels
      on Oct 15, 2017

      I posted above on this plant.....I know it as Fortnight Lily and it is also known as walking iris!
  • Patricia B
    on Apr 30, 2012

    this is a spider plant there are some that are striped and some that are solid color I've had both kinds make a beautiful hanging plant

    • Mae Garrels
      on Oct 15, 2017

      If we are all talking about the photo that Eulelia posted, the plant is not a spider plant. It is a Fortnight Lily. The plants are entirely different. The leaves may look the same in a photo but they are not. The spider plants leaves are soft and tear easily, roots are different! The Fortnight Lily's leaves are darker green and leaves are tough and fibrous and it sends out shoots from the bottom, around original roots.....easy to remove when small to make new plants. You will not find long tendrils that have baby plants on the end on a Fortnight Lily. The Lily has strong long shoots with a pretty flower I think reminds me of a orchid.....this plant is also known as some type of iris.
  • Janine J
    on Apr 30, 2012

    it's a spider plant

  • Kelli E
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Val H is correct. Spider plants send out "stems" that that babies grow on. They don't grow from the tips of the leaves.

  • Margaret C
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Not a spider plant, a family of the iris.

  • Brian S
    on Apr 30, 2012

    N. gracilis

  • Are the leaves tough and fibrous or easy to pierce with a finger nail? Looks like a pup" that" arrived from ground route not from out shooting of babies

  • Joanna A
    on Apr 30, 2012

    IT'S A WALKIN IRIS I HAVE 2 DIFFERENT COLORS

  • Lisa A
    on Apr 30, 2012

    its called a spider plant,,, u can pull the little spiders off of it and they will grow on their own

  • BONNIE J
    on Apr 30, 2012

    THINK THE IRIS PEOPLE HAVE ME CONVINCED! ((-:

  • Sue B
    on Apr 30, 2012

    THIS IS A SPIDER PLANT THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT VARIETIES ! YOU CAN TRANSPLANT THE BABIES AND THEY ALL WILL GROW LIKE WEEDS EASY TO CARE FOR TOO ;)

  • Becky H
    on Apr 30, 2012

    I have to agree with Jo G.; it looks like a walking iris.

  • Pat W
    on Apr 30, 2012

    All CAPS don't make it a spider plant Sue. Not saying you're wrong, just loud. The leaves are shaped like both iris and spider plant. Every form of iris I've seen regenerates by risone division, not what this wierdo is doing with leaf tips taking root.

    • Mae Garrels
      on Oct 15, 2017

      Pat, that's because this plant that you call a 'walking iris' is not really an iris at all........ look it up on the Internet and you will see it is called Fortnight Lily, also has a couple of other common names. I have these plants all over my yard...some still have tags . I also have many of the
      Spider plants.................not even related!!!!! There are so many plants that have this type of leaves on them, that is they sort of look alike, but if examined carefully, they are very different. In color, texture and growth.
      The plants known as 'Naked Ladies'' have leaves that look more like the Spider plant than this Fortnight Lily. I have the naked ladies too. from the Amaryllis family, I think . They get green leaves in the fall, stay pretty green all winter here in CA, then in the spring start turning yellow, die down completely in the late spring and summer, but by fall have long shoots with pretty pink flowers. The bulbs get quite large. I just love flowers of all kinds so I do have quite a few books on plants. I mark my books when I get the plants for my gardens so I can know what they all are.
  • Debi M
    on Apr 30, 2012

    I have attached a photo of a spider plant. What you have is a walking iris. I've had spider plants for years. They do have "tendrils" as evidenced in the photo. They also bloom and will bear small white flowers with a nice scent

    q a question about a plant, gardening
  • Donna B
    on Apr 30, 2012

    It could be a Lariope

    • Mae Garrels
      on Oct 15, 2017

      Donna, I have that plant too, both in purple and white and I did think at first it could be Lariope in the photo until I saw the offshoots of the plant. It is a Fortnight Lily for sure or as some call it a 'walking iris', it has other comon names also as does the lariope plant
  • Rebecca D
    on Apr 30, 2012

    Pony - Tail Plant aka bottle palm ! Are the flowers small, clustered, and whitish ?

  • Patricia N
    on Apr 30, 2012

    I agree with everyone else, its a spider plant, I have one just like it on my front porch.

    • Mae Garrels
      on Oct 15, 2017

      Pat, are you talking about the photo that Eulalia posted? There were several photos of Spider Plant posted after she posted a photo of her plant and I'm wondering if people have gotten the photo's mixed up. The original photo posted from Eulalia posted is not a spider plant. It is a fortnight lily and since you and I are neighbors, I live in Modesto!, I'm sure you are also acquainted with the Fortnight Lily, also knows as walking iris.
      I sat down an hour ago and found this site.......now it is almost dinner time ! I seem to lose track of time when talking about plants........
  • John W
    on Apr 30, 2012

    its a spider!

  • Susan S
    on Apr 30, 2012

    I think our Pros - Erica, Doug or Walter need to weigh in here!! Personally, I DO NOT think it's any type of Spider plant. While there are varieties that have solid green leaves and others are variegated white/green striped, I've had both kinds and they have always had a stem that the babies sprout from. I'd be more inclined to think it's an Iris type of plant.

  • Eulalia
    on May 1, 2012

    Walter, that's exactly what it is! Thank you. I have never had irises before but I could tell it was in the iris family. I've had spider plants before and although they do look a little alike, I knew it wasn't a spider. Can't wait to see if it blooms for me! Thank you everyone for all your input.

  • Eulalia
    on May 1, 2012

    Kelli E. you nailed it too, but somehow I missed your link. Gotta give credit where it's due!

  • Sheila
    on May 1, 2012

    I agree with "walking iris", not a spider plant.

  • LouAnne S
    on May 1, 2012

    If it's truly a spider plant,, do NOT put it in the ground! I currently am giving them away as we dig them up. Unless of course you want to fill a bed with them - they will do that. They are best in a hanging pot where you can let the "babies" dance in the air and look pretty. Does nicely outside in the summer and winter if you have no snow.

  • Glad Walter weighed in....I don't know much about plants but it looks like an Iris just looking at it....but I best stick to fixing houses!

  • Genora E
    on May 1, 2012

    I agree with Walter. I was given a pot of this by a local hort instructor last year. He also called it a walking iris.

  • C E
    on May 1, 2012

    It's a flying iris or walking iris, it has babies that can be rooted in soil or water. It will have a bloom on it like an iris that will open in the morning and will close at night (not to open again, but not to worry their will be more) Feed it with all purpose plant food dulited by half maybe every three weeks. The blooms will be purple and yellow like an iris. Likes the outside hung on a covered porch or under a tree (not in direct hot sun) be sure to bring in before the first frost. Enjoy!!!!

  • Leslie D
    on May 1, 2012

    Eh, what do I know....I kill every house plant I have, anyway...LOL

  • Sharron W
    on May 1, 2012

    WOW! never heard of "walking Iris" before but hey i'm always willing to learn... I guess I stand corrected cause as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words...I'm convinced, you've got walking Iris...LOL

  • Eulalia
    on May 1, 2012

    Happy to know what it is. Going to put it outside in front of the house where we have a large area with trees and hopefully it will walk itself around and fill up that space!!

  • Becky H
    on May 2, 2012

    It will indeed Eulalia! Every time it blooms, a new iris will develop.

  • Sharron W
    on May 3, 2012

    Gonna have to try to find some of these!

  • Val L
    on May 3, 2012

    Now that we have discovered that it is in the Iris family anyone know if it will grow in Las Vegas? I have beautiful bearded iris and would love to add those

  • MaryAnn L
    on May 3, 2012

    This is indeed a walking Iris !!!! Nice plant but will take over if not thinned

  • Eulalia
    on May 3, 2012

    Val, I think Las Vegas is 9b and you should be able to grow them there.

  • Jo G
    on May 4, 2012

    You will know if it has blooms similar to an Iris that it is a walking Iris. I don't think spider plants bloom.

  • Val L
    on May 4, 2012

    when a spider blooms, it has teeny tiny white flowers

  • Rainy Odessy
    on Jul 17, 2012

    my mom has this and she calls it walking iris.....it is a house plant that apparenty spreads to other nearby pots or the ground easily...not sure if it is really an iris member or not....but the flowers are certainly not worth bragging about and are very tiny

  • Wanda sinnema
    on Mar 16, 2015

    cool plant,, II have iris,, never heard of this,,, something new for the garden!

  • DORLIS
    on Apr 15, 2015

    Does anyone know where they can b bought. I live in Missouri

  • Linda Jamison
    on Nov 14, 2016

    It is neomarica gracilis which is commonly called walking iris as another person said.

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