Cheryl S
Cheryl S
  • Hometalker
  • Show Low, AZ
Asked on May 3, 2012

anyone know what this plant is?

Tan5227879Kathleen FGeorgeanne I
+54

Answered

My husband brushed up against it, and it "trashed" his forearm. It has been 10 days and the arm is still red and sore and peeling. I have looked into poison ivy, oak, and sumac, and none match. Thanks!
q anyone know what this plant is, gardening
q anyone know what this plant is, gardening
q anyone know what this plant is, gardening
57 answers
  • 3po3
    on May 3, 2012

    It's not necessarily a particularly nasty poisonous plant that "bit" your husband. First, different plants cause various reactions in people. Also, it could just be that his cuts got infected in this case, and it wasn't even the plant's fault, really.

  • Teresa K
    on May 3, 2012

    Looks like Virginia creeper, alot of people are allergic to it just like poison ivy...

  • Jeannie Connelley B
    on May 3, 2012

    my mom, who has passed away, knew the actual name of this plant but all I can remember is the nick name she called it - "cow itch" !!

  • Sharon Kay W
    on May 3, 2012

    The leaves are characteristic to lantana,but I don't see any blooms;does it flower?

  • Willie F
    on May 3, 2012

    That just looks like a raspberry plant that,and while it has thorns,it is not really a plant known to cause much reaction except cuts from the thorns.

  • Nea M
    on May 3, 2012

    i wonder if this is a plant referred to as sting weed? we have sting weed in nebraska and if you touch it, it will "bite" you, causing a stinging sensation that can last for days. just a thought. hope you find out what it is.

  • Tracy N
    on May 3, 2012

    I don't recognize it. I'd take a sample of the plant with your husband to a dermatologist (wearing gloves doing so of course). It could be the plant or it may be that he was just allergic to it.

  • Jennifer V
    on May 3, 2012

    It looks like Purslane. Purslane is a low growing weed that is occasionally used in salads. Are the stems sort of fleshy and full of liquid? He might be allergic to that.

  • Sally P
    on May 3, 2012

    Where are you located??? That might help me fiqure it out...............

  • Ginger H
    on May 3, 2012

    Where do you live? It almost looks like Stinging Nettle but the leaves are a bit rounded in this photo.

  • Sylvia R
    on May 3, 2012

    no it's prob the plant .. when we were little we had a plant like that all over the property in the country!! We would just call it "bad weed" but in Spanish I think it was called STINGING NETTLE. And yea it gives you the worst rash and burns and takes awhile to go away !!!! put calamine lotion thats what my mom would do !!... Good Luck !!

  • Aubrey L
    on May 3, 2012

    I can't identify the plant....but I CAN tell you that it is NOT Virginia creeper. Virginia creeper is a climbing vine.

  • Sheryll S
    on May 3, 2012

    Not what they call Virginia Creeper here in Jax...... I have them and they are the proverbial thorn in my side.

  • Lynn T
    on May 3, 2012

    I am one of the super allergic. Yes, carry a tube o RX medicine with me in the summer. Watch for red edges- Red on them, red on you...

  • Chris S
    on May 3, 2012

    If you are on the west coast, it could be poison oak, but the leaves don't look quite right.

  • Sheryll S
    on May 3, 2012

    I don't want even ONE more nasty growing things, so puleeze keep it over there in AZ?? Please, please, please?

  • Linn L
    on May 3, 2012

    I researched also and it's not any of the above plants. I would suggest you take the photo's (which are very good btw) to a local nursery, botanical garden center or send them to a local edu extension for identification. Could it have been an insect on the bush instead?

  • Donna G
    on May 3, 2012

    It's definitely NOT stinging nettle (the leaves are much "spikier" on nettle)...My yard is covered with that stuff in the spring. It looks like one of the many varieties of poison oak to me.

  • Sharron P
    on May 3, 2012

    Looks a bit like witch hazel leaf I though Virginia creeper had a more star shaped leaf. Looks like a western state bush?

  • Erin H
    on May 3, 2012

    It DOES look like a raspberry plant! Maybe you can put some gardening gloves on and snip a bit off and put that into a canvas bag and bring it to your local garden supply store. Maybe they can help you out! IF it is a raspberry bush, ENJOY those berries!

  • Hillary H
    on May 3, 2012

    After seeing the pictures it almost looks like a very old Azalea. If your husband had any open area on his arm like a cut or even a scratch it could cause a severe allergic reaction. They are highly toxic if ingested and could have gotten into the bloodstream through a wound.

  • Marie O
    on May 3, 2012

    It's NOT purslane EITHER!

  • Renee B
    on May 3, 2012

    It kinda looks like a Viburnum to me...but they bloom with big showy snowball like flowers on it. It's not Virginia creeper, because it's woody and Va. creeper is a vine. I think take it to your local extension office. Let us know what it is.

  • Lee W
    on May 3, 2012

    Could be Dogwood.

  • Lisa C
    on May 3, 2012

    It is a wood rose bush..flowers in early June

  • Glenda B
    on May 3, 2012

    I would clip off a limb and take it to your local nursery/garden center and ask them. Stop by the dermatologist on the way home. You will get 100 guesses on here.

  • Rick S
    on May 3, 2012

    I think it's Velvet Bean, commonly called Cowitch, technically, Mucuna Pruriens

  • Carrie W
    on May 3, 2012

    looks like mountain mahogany. never heard of a reaction to it however!

  • Pam Y
    on May 3, 2012

    Too hard to tell but it's not a dogwood. Can you show closer pictures. Grows like a barberry and that's has needles like a rose bush also causes a rash and scratches

  • Jan O
    on May 3, 2012

    Take it (wear gloves and a baggy) to your local extension office!!

  • Stephany C
    on May 3, 2012

    I have "cow itch" by my fence row and it don't look anything like that..I think it's a wood rose, can't really tell. cow itch don't have stems like that. It's kinda viny with little hairs on the stems. the best remedy is a weed that is known around here as hollow weed. gets little pods on it that explode when you touch them. cut the stem open and rub it on the itch and it clears up all but right away.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on May 3, 2012

    First of all it is a woody shrub type plant...that i the first clue. So nettles and creepers and all of that get tossed out the window. I'll thinking it is a "bog birch" http://www.flickr.com/photos/carolannie/4736562829/

  • Georgeanne I
    on May 3, 2012

    Certainly not Virginia Creeper, I do know that.

  • Myra P
    on May 3, 2012

    Post up a pic of the rash on his arm. I'm doubting it was from this plant at all. It could be Eczema or Psoriasis.

  • Georgeanne I
    on May 3, 2012

    Lisa C., prove it. Give us the proper name. I'm a Master Gardener and can't find it, not that it is in my zone.

  • Cheryl S
    on May 3, 2012

    Wow, this is fascinating. Thank you all. To answer a few, we are in the White Mountains in northeastern Arizona. We have Virginia Creeper on our fence, so I don't think it is that. He felt it within a minute of brushing up against the plant. And it burned; no itch.

  • Nancy G
    on May 3, 2012

    Use Meat Tenderizer it draws the poison out let it set on it

  • Carmen S
    on May 3, 2012

    it's Stinging Nettle it is an acid that enter the body from contact. You need to apply a base such as baking soda

  • Laura D
    on May 3, 2012

    Milk of magnesia will take the burn out and dry up the poison.It will feel cold when applied.Let it dry and stay on as long as possible.

  • Lisa D
    on May 3, 2012

    She lives in Arizona & its a creosote bush.

  • Pam M
    on May 3, 2012

    looks like some kind of cactus.

  • Lynn K
    on May 4, 2012

    Is this the plant Garlic Mustard? Lots of it in Wisconsin. Check out downtoearthgardening.net and see if the picture matches what is posted there.

  • Michael E
    on May 4, 2012

    Poison ivy, poison oak,etc; this stuff Works!!! tecnu poison ivy remover. It is a detergent, not a drug. It breaks down the chemical compound which causes the nasty oil "urusihol" to lock onto your skin and not come off. Not sure what he git into but I would highly recommend going to CVS or Greens and trying it. at first it nay still itch but the key is to get the oil off your skin. this stuff does it. I sent months on steroids prescribed by Dr and couldn't get rid of it. Tecnu did the job!!! http://www.teclabsinc.com/store/poison-oak-ivy/tecnu

  • Vicki O
    on May 4, 2012

    as a master gardener, I would say take a sample of the plant to your extention office, case closed

  • Brian S
    on May 4, 2012

    Just a guess but looks like an old old creosote bush they get that gray woody stem when real old

  • Rhonda G
    on May 4, 2012

    Looks like a creosote bush...but the closeup of the leaves are different. Very serrated and dentate and glossy. The creosote pics I've seen don't look like this.

  • Paula L
    on May 4, 2012

    stinging nettles.

  • Deborah R
    on May 4, 2012

    As a m.g. also, I totally agree with Vicki O

  • Sherrie F
    on May 6, 2012

    Multi-floral rose. Your husband has to get all the thorns out before his arm will heal. My uncle almost lost an arm over this bush once. This bush was planted to help the farmers with their cattle. Go to doctor now, or as soon as possible!

  • Linn L
    on May 7, 2012

    Spent some more time resarching natives in your area and the leaf definitely indicates a type of Mountain Mahogany shrub which can be toxic. Here is a good link I found for info and pictures. It's a Texas reference but the shrub grows in the west and south west: http://essmextension.tamu.edu/plants/toxics/detail.aspx?plantID=91

  • Georgeanne I
    on May 17, 2012

    Good job Linn L!

  • Kathleen F
    on May 24, 2012

    I can tell you for certain that it's not raspberry; it's not a rose--multiflora or otherwise; it's not stinging nettles; it's not Virginia Creeper; it's not creosote bush; and it's not poison oak! Check with the Forest Service or someone at the County Extension offices in your area and then you'll know for sure. I would guess it might be Mountain Mahogany but I'm not familiar enough with AZ fauna, so why second guess? Good luck.

  • Kathleen F
    on May 24, 2012

    ....and it's not purslane or azalea either!

  • Tan5227879
    on Nov 4, 2016

    Leaves look similar to Nothofagus

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