Dyanne
Dyanne
  • Hometalker
  • Phenix City, AL
Asked on Jun 14, 2013

The Straw Bale Pallet Crate Garden use

DyanneSharonEllen H
+9

Answered

Can you plant tomatoes using the Straw Bale Pallet Crate Garden method from Old World Farms? As a newbie (at 65yrs. old & very1st try) to vegetable gardening, I don't want to do a lot of bending & stooping to plant, keep weeds out & harvest. I already have my seeds growing in small pots. If this is not good for tomatoes, does anyone have suggestions?
12 answers
  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jun 14, 2013

    You can certainly grow tomatoes in a straw bale garden, Dyanne, although I suspect it may be getting late for planting them in Alabama. You will have to provide cages or some other means of support as the tomatoes grow.

  • ScattyLady
    on Jun 14, 2013

    why would it be late to plant tomatoes in Alabama? also why not buy some plants this year and grow those on, then buy seeds for next year and start them earlier! :-) in UK I am just about to plant out my seedlings which are now about 6 inches tall. spring was really slow coming this year.

  • Dyanne
    on Jun 14, 2013

    No it is not too late to plant tomatoes in Alabama. My brother is a master gardener, lives in Kentucky & told me they would just be late tomatoes. I just wondered about the "straw bale" method. Thanks for the answers, but I'm still hoping for more ideas.

  • Dyanne
    on Jun 14, 2013

    Waiting for more ideas.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jun 15, 2013

    The reason I said it may be too late is because tomatoes will not set fruit when daytime temperatures are above 90°F and night temperatures above 70°F. You probably don't have to worry about that in the UK, ScattyLady, but we definitely do in the southern US.

  • Ellen H
    on Jun 15, 2013

    @Douglas Hunt We've had quite the unusual spring in Alabama this year - my tomatoes have been in the ground for a few weeks but look like they were planted last week. I live in north Alabama and until this week, it just hasn't been hot enough for tomatoes to grow well. And we typically can plant heat-loving varieties later in the season to extend the harvest. Lots of folks here stagger plantings for longer harvest times, essentially having two gardens per season.

  • Dyanne
    on Jun 16, 2013

    Thank you Doug & Ellen for the info. I live in East Alabama and know nothing about about the region when it comes to planting veggies. Your info. is very valuable to me. So, now i know it also has a lot to do with what the plant does at different temperatures! Now, I know partly why my sister-in-law was telling me to start the seeds early inside.

  • Sharon
    on Jun 16, 2013

    Dyanne,I finally found the straw bale/pallet crate idea so I'd know what you"re talking about...i would use a trellis type support attached to the pallet bottom in back ,or three stake triangle idea,which you could even drive into the ground thru the bale and between pallet boards... oh,and face your thermometer away from the plants,so they don't know it's too hot to bloom,lol

  • Ellen H
    on Jun 17, 2013

    @Dyanne Your local Extension office (Alabama Cooperative Extension System) can provide you with good information about planting in your region. There are many publications available online at their website www.aces.edu

  • Dyanne
    on Jun 27, 2013

    Thanks everyone for your info. I am learning. I hope to have a great small vegetable garden next year. I see this will take some planning.

  • Sharon
    on Jun 27, 2013

    Good luck,Ms Dyanne!And if garden centers have any mature plants to add to your garden ,you can still have stuff this year,too.Lots of markdowns going on now. I got some squash and strawberries last week w/blooms ...and paid half price!You see hometalk is a great resource for ideas...lots of smart folks on here!

  • Dyanne
    on Jun 29, 2013

    Sharon, you are right. Plenty of smart folks & they are willing to give advice. I will checkout the garden centers & see if I can find an veg. with blooms.

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