Anna Ibarra
Anna Ibarra
  • Hometalker
  • San Antonio, TX
Asked on Jun 15, 2013

Help or suggestions on ceramic pot

Anna IbarraGail lichtsinnShelley S
+16

Answered

I got these 4 very large ceramic pots at a yard sale for a super price. I didn't care for color so I primed, spray painted them red and now color is peeling including primer. What can I do to repair the color so it can keep the pretty red. They all have dirt w/plants.
paint peeling off
paint peeling off
primed
primed
How I bought them
How I bought them
17 answers
  • Anna Ibarra
    on Jun 15, 2013

    will I posted 3 but just 1 came out & sideways. I was using my cell. will better when I get on my PC! I should get an IPAD! sorry guys!

  • Melissa Gutilla
    on Jun 15, 2013

    I think for anything like this it needs to be sanded first-if it had a gloss on it before. Then paint. Maybe now you can just sand, repaint and put a clear finish on it. I'm in the process of painting my bathroom fixtures to a dark bronze and that's what everyone told me to do. Hope it helps

  • Ashley Wilson-Cox
    on Jun 16, 2013

    clear coat maybe?

  • Catherine Smith
    on Jun 16, 2013

    Agree with Melissa. Since these appear to be either ceramic or a similar material, you need to rough sand the glazed finish, wipe it down. That will allow your new paint to adhere. I'd seal the outside only with some type of clear coat. Not the bottom or inside, the planter needs to "breath".

  • Since it is ceramic, the inside is probably porous. That will allow the moisture from dirt and water to seep through to the outside where you painted. Rather than planting directly into the pot, use a plastic container as a liner.

  • Tracy Bromage
    on Jun 16, 2013

    I would use a liquid sandpaper first and "rough it up" also when done I would seal it with and outdoor sealant. Not sure what hardware store you have in your area but all have a version of these products.

  • Tracy Bromage
    on Jun 16, 2013

    Also meant to add love the shape of the pot and sometimes chippy paint looks cute. (personal preference I suppose)

  • Maggie D
    on Jun 16, 2013

    Sometimes, it's hard to paint over glazed pottery because that finish is baked on. I don't think the color is that bad, but you have to live with it. I'd group the pots together, add height to one or two for interest, and fill them with solid color greenery that needs that little bit of red to pop. You won't even notice the pots after a while.

  • Paula Wyrick
    on Jun 16, 2013

    I like the "distressed" look you are getting from nature!

  • Gail lichtsinn
    on Jun 16, 2013

    If you didnt finish the inside moisture will come from the inside to the back of the paint outside and cause it to flake and peel..Sand it smooth where needed and repint the inside and the outside..Dont use Latex paint it draws moisture..Enamel will repel it but you MUST finsh the whole inside also

  • Gail Salminen
    on Jun 17, 2013

    @Anna Ibarra I think you have sound advice from @Melissa Gutilla and @Gail lichtsinn the only thing I would add is that you should redo the the finish coat annually (use outdoor finish). I would also suggest you use a rustoleum like product. Sometimes it is appealing to paint the inside another colour - could be darker or lighter, same shade or different, I have done some pots red outside and yellow inside. Let us know what you do and how it works.

  • Catherine Smith
    on Jun 17, 2013

    Not a good idea to paint the inside of these type of containers that have been glazed. The material (whether it be made from stoneware or ceramic slip) needs to breath. By sanding and refinishing the outside of the pot, your are improving the aesthetics, but only removing the top layer of the glaze. As a former ceramic instructor, I can tell you the glaze is not going to "move" these type of items are fired at extremely high temps designed to allow the glaze to penetrate and bond with the ceramic material. If you coat the inside of these, you are running the risk of the entire pot shattering, since it needs to be porous to expand and contract. Given the size of these, that could be very dangerous. It's like not adding very hot water to a cold glass container, works the same way.

  • Shelley S
    on Jun 17, 2013

    I agree. I would sand them good. Then wipe down with a good cleaner to insure there is no residue on them. If you don't have anything, A good wipe down with vinegar will do. Make sure that you are using the correct spray paint. If the pots are plastic , be sure to use the spray paint for plastic. You can't go wrong with Rustoleum or Krylon. Avoid the cheap store brand paints. With spray paint you really do get what you pay for.

  • Anna Ibarra
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I need a clarification about a response ; so I shouldn't paint the inside then? Or should I? I'm wondering if or not I should empty out the plants & dirt & start over. Shelley S. these are 4 large very heavy ceramic pots. My daughter told me to leave as is, but I'm thinking that I don't like the original color. I added these as red as I did a partly hard scape in my front yard and it was so much natural rock that I wanted to soften it with some pop of color so the landscaper suggested I lay them about the yard to spread the color. I recently moved the one pictured as it was getting too much sun, where it was. That one was direct sun and was the one peeling the worst.

  • Shelley S
    on Jun 19, 2013

    If you don't like the color, you can just cover the plants well and do all the work with it full. You don't have to paint the inside. That isn't seen any way. Honestly I never paint the insides. I don't know what effect that might have on the plant. To empty them would be a huge undertaking. I would just try to work around the plants or wait until next year before you plant them if the plants are annuals. Hope that helps.

  • Gail lichtsinn
    on Jun 22, 2013

    If the pot is porpous and it looks like it you HAVE to seal the inside and the outside or the paint will fail..All water based paints draw moisture(latex) I would say since it is outside i would seal it inside and out even if i put a pot inside of it..If you use a latex paint you will have to clear coat it inside and out after using the latex..You need to lightly sand the old flaking paint off.. Paint flaking is almost always due to water or something already on the surface that repels the paint

  • Anna Ibarra
    on Jun 30, 2013

    Thank you all for the great advice. I think I will wait on this mainly cause of our heatwave at the moment. I went to paint for simply less then 30 min and in full shade and it was extremely hot. Not good!

    • Anna Ibarra
      on Feb 18, 2015

      @Bernice H Hi Bernice, for now I decided to leave them as is. My daughter thought it gave them a vintage look. Also, when I asked it was so extremely hot then, but 3 of them have great established plants in them that have flourished, and they are extremely heavy, can't move them, all are have been embedded by the large rock landscape that I had done. However, I know I will have plans to re- paint them and will have to see about Catherine Smith's advice. Thanks for asking.

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