Lauren of Mom Home Guide
Lauren of Mom Home Guide
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  • Hightstown, NJ
Asked on Jun 16, 2013

Privacy for Chain Link Fence and Patio

CaroleElizabeth SagarminagaLauren of Mom Home Guide
+64

Answered

Hi! A chain link fence separates my home's backyard from a busy playground. I've planted schip laurels for privacy, but my home's backyard still has next to no privacy. I used to have a tarp on the fence, but it didn't last long. Is there something else I can do to provide privacy to our yard and patio? We are not allowed to plant vines on the fence.
The schip laurels with the privacy tarp (that got shredded by wind).
The schip laurels with the privacy tarp (that got shredded by wind).
My home's backyard patio -- pretty, but no privacy!
My home's backyard patio -- pretty, but no privacy!
64 answers
  • Marcy
    on Jun 17, 2013

    Are you allowed to place a lattice type of material/fencing along the chain link fence?

  • Lauren of Mom Home Guide
    on Jun 17, 2013

    Thanks for the tip, Marcy. I was thinking of using zip ties to attach lattice to the fence.

  • I planted forsythia bushes along my chain link fence last year at each of the posts. This year the bushes are about 4 1/2 feet tall and about the same width and cover a lot of the fence.

  • Lauren of Mom Home Guide
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Maybe I planted the wrong bushes! But hopefully, mine will grow more soon.

  • KrysFL
    on Jun 18, 2013

    They make slats you can buy that weave into the fence if you want to try that. Otherwise, I'd build a nice wood privacy wall (like a privacy fence but maybe only 20 feet or so just to give you privacy). http://m.lowes.com/Fencing/Chain-Link-Fencing/Chain-Link-Privacy-Slats/_/N-1z0zgvi/pl The above link shows the slats I'm talking about

  • Gabriel D
    on Jun 18, 2013

    A great way of screening for privacy and that actually looks great is to put in the ground several posts either wood or metal at spans no more than 8 feet apart. Eye screws for wood posts; eye bolts for metal posts mounted on both sides of your posts paralell to your fence line. Next you string picture wire from eye to eye using a metal clip like one a typical dog leash has. This will allow you to assemble/disassemble the rigging to allow stringing cloth panels between the posts. One can string up a wire rigging directly below the cloth panels with metal rings ( preferably rust proof ) mounted a few inches from the ground to ensure your panels remain dry and free of dirt or grass stains or use curtain weights at the bottom of each panel in which case there is no need for a bottom wire rigging. Once installed you simply walk the panel between the posts as you would a shower curtain. You can choose just how much or how little privacy you wish for by selecting all or a few panels to be drawn. Strong winds aren't a problem as you simply keep the panels undrawn as you wouldn't be in your yard sitting during a storm or high winds. The dog leash clips are available at most hardware stores/chains and make removing the panels to wash or store away easy. I like a muslin cloth not too stiff or white bedsheets make an elegant effect and reminds me of yesteryear when people (hard working mothers) hung sheets on the clothesline. One can use light chain ( again rust proof ) in place of the picture wire as it allows one to draw out the panels only so far and ensures that the panels don't walk back and forth in a mild breeze. I suppose one could select rope or clothesline wire (it comes in several colours) as an alternative to plain picture wire. Now sit back alone or with family and friends and enjoy! If you have questions or would like me to post some illustrations simply request it of me and I'll draw some up and post them. Have a wonderful summer my creative friends. Gabe

  • Gabriel D
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Hope tjis help you Lauren or someone here.

  • Lauren of Mom Home Guide
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Hi, Gabriel -- I like your ideas, as they sound effective and inexpensive. (My budget is a bit limited.) Do you have any photos or images you could share of the privacy system you describe? Thanks so much for your help! Great ideas!

  • Shirley Vanderau
    on Jun 18, 2013

    maybe plant bamboo or tall bushes a long the fence..

  • Cindy E
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Morning Glory will cover it eventually. But you can get privacy Lattice ( green) it's expensive but will last for years :)

  • Chris H
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Cali Bamboo offers a bamboo fencing option for you to choose from.

  • Barbara Poley
    on Jun 18, 2013

    I have a neighbor I needed to screen out, so I planted a row of evergreen Photinia. It's a beautiful, broad-leafed evergreen that blooms in may, with vibrant red new growth each spring. They can grow to about 15' tall and about 8' wide. Mine are about 3x3 right now, but it won't be long before I get to say bye-bye to my grumpy friend! I'd say they're a moderately fast grower, 8 to 12" a year, not nearly as fast as the forsythia mentioned above, but the plus is that they're evergreen, so I'm willing to wait. I hope you find a great solution that fits your needs and pocketbook!

  • Carol G
    on Jun 18, 2013

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Privacy-Weave-for-Chain-Link-Fence-/270794174079 This looks like a good possibility. Seems to be less expensive than some other ways...

  • Kathy D
    on Jun 18, 2013

    I'm assuming putting up a solid fencing is not an option for you? The only thing I can think of that would give privacy is pretty bushes. If it's in a sunny location, plant some knock out rose bushes. I planted one about 7 years ago and it's full and tall now..Planting several in that area will fill it in nicely, but my choice would be a solid fence, either stockade or vinyl.

  • Betty Carver
    on Jun 18, 2013

    what about bamboo

  • Judith F
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Rattan sections!You can attach them easily and it is a great natural and cheaper price than other covers.I know that it is available, but have to google to remember where!

  • Nancy Byrne
    on Jun 18, 2013

    They have a thin aluminum strip that you can braid thru the fence links on the slant I did it to my chain link fence and it does provide privacy it comes in white and green ask any fence company

  • Mary D
    on Jun 18, 2013

    I have the same issue with a neighbors chain link fence. I went to Home Depot and purchased ornamental grass to help hide the fence

  • Carol M
    on Jun 18, 2013

    I like the ideas of evergreens like cypress or black bamboo. Anything that is natural will look good..Whatever grows well in your climate. good luck

  • DES187377
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Because there are children on other side,you must be careful what will be planted. I would build planter boxes 2x4 ft high..or one continuous.That will take up for 4t of fence for privacy.Then plant BOXWOODS, and plant them close together,like 8 inches apart..They grow fast and will create a tight wall of lush green around 4ft high..Safe as well:) Now you have your 6ft of wall covered in privacy and very easy to maintain.Trim to your liking:) I like to cover mine in chistmas lights ..all white because near my patio. HAVE FUN!!

  • Kathleen F
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Attach sections of lattice to your fence. You cane get it in white or green. Use either pieces of wire or zip ties to attach it. You can also use fence wraps that look like ivy covering it.

  • Jayne
    on Jun 18, 2013

    move

  • Jacque D
    on Jun 18, 2013

    If you plant Bamboo you will be forever trying to cut it back, it's very invasive. I would try planting a creeping vine such as honeysuckle or jasmine or maybe english ivy, but they too can be invasive and you will want to keep it from getting to thick but they are nothing like bamboo. Morning glory's die back in the winter time so would not offer you any privacy. You could try a hedge of bushes. Personally, I like chain link fences over wood privacy fences, they are nearly indestructible and won't rot! You might even look into those all weather tarps and put that up during the school year.

  • Carol M
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Lauren I just looked at your blog and realized it might be a good idea for you to start with evergreens at the back on the fence, then do some design gardening in front.. You like to make things pretty so make a pretty garden of perennials and a very few color spots with annuals.you can ck out my garden on fb Carol Meier, I will friend you:):)

  • Kandee S
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Don't plant bamboo as it will take over everywhere. Boxwood hedges? wood slats or they even have colored plastic slats that weave into the fence

  • Kandee S
    on Jun 18, 2013

    If you make planter boxes place them 2 feet in front of fence. Then you can plant grape vines and string them together and clip away from fence. I try to plant only edible stuff so as to not waste water.

  • Linda C
    on Jun 18, 2013

    I used zip ties to hold vinyl lattice to the chain link fence then planted shrubs infront of the lattice. looks good and it does block the nasty back yard next door!!

  • Elizabeth
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Why are so many suggestions being given to tie things to the fence or to grow things on the fence. Lauren already stated that she isn't allowed to grow vines on the fence. My conclusion is that the fence doesn't belong to her, but to the city (i.e., it's part of the park's property). If she attaches plants or materials to it, would that not put her at risk for being fined by the city? Or given a notice to remove things from the fence? Then, given that she's already on a tight budget, that would be money wasted, right? Lauren, the ideas of planting evergreen shrubs are really good. A place to watch for good deals on them is at Lowe's. Most Lowe's stores have a clearance area in the garden centers--up to 50% or even 75% reduced. That's a great place to check to see what's available & what will work for you. Best wishes as you sort out this issue. :)

  • Cher Kalil
    on Jun 18, 2013

    I'd plant various vines. Try planting a hydranea vine! It grows pretty quickly, has lovely flowers and is difficult to see through. Trumpet vine is also a very fast grower, easily 20-30 feet/year! But don't let it lay on the ground before you lift it onto the fence or it will root!!!

  • Diane Kuzilla
    on Jun 18, 2013

    They make plastic slats for chain link fences that run vertically and therefore look much better than the old type of weave-through "slats." They are a bit pricey, but are low maintenance, provide privacy, and block out much of the noise.

  • Frances Hoffman
    on Jun 18, 2013

    you can use slats on the chain links fencing, for both \ and / patterns, , it may not give total privacy, however, it can sure cut down most of the prying eyes

  • Mke136057
    on Jun 18, 2013

    We have a bamboo in our backyard that doesn't get out of control - it hid our neighbors just like we wanted it to do - it spread a small amount but not like bamboo that you can't contro

  • Jane Burkhart
    on Jun 18, 2013

    What about putting up a white vinyl privacy fence? You would not have to worry about planting anything or waiting for something to grow and fill in for privacy. It may cost more but woth it in the long run and instant privacy!

  • Margaret J
    on Jun 18, 2013

    go to Home depot and get sheets of lattice put against the fence..you can secure it to fence

  • Linda S
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Leland Cyprus grow fairly quick can be bought for5.00 each in 5 years they are 5 ft tall best privacy screen.

  • Faye G
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I would plant Lorepetelum.....Evergreen shrub that get 8 or 10 feet tall, or you can keep it trimmed back top desired height...It has deep burgandy leaves all year long and blooms with pink flowers 2 or 3 times a year...It's sometimes call Chinese Fringe Flower...Beautiful!!!!

  • Sheila
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I would plant Ivy, climbing rose bushes, clematis vines, etc. on that fence! The ivy is an all season cover and the others add seasonal color!!!!!

  • Pam W
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Chain link privacy slats or weaves are a great way to create your own space, especially in your back yard. Read more at http://www.infobarrel.com/Chain_Link_Privacy_Slats_-_Affordable_Inserts_for_Your_Fence#zxJ9ZfBEovRMiHDk.99

  • Kimberly Barney
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I was going to suggest the aluminum inserts that you string through the chain link fence. My mother used them at my childhood home. There is also faux greenery that can be tied to the fence but I do not know if it would stay up any better than the tarp. You may also wish to consider placement of fence panels which can be made from scrap metal, old windows, painted or decaled inexpensive wood picture frames placed within a frame made by using fence posts. You would not have to have the panels touch to provide the privacy and could plant ornamental grasses between the panels. Zebra grass grows tall and quick.

  • Denise Smith
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Poplar bushes grow thick and fairly quickly in The pacific NW. My mind went to a small fence inside the fence. If it is on your wooden fence or trellis then you can plant on it. you did not say ow busy it is in winter e.g. hockey rink.

  • Carol C
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I've seen strips of material, like that used to repair outdoor chairs, braided through a chain link fence. It was white. It really didn't look bad and I believe it cost next to nothing. Probably could get at Lowes or Home Depot.

  • Linda P
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Hi Lauren, I would go to your City's Ordinance Dept or Building Dept. and ask them what would they legally allow you to do for pivacy on that fence line. You don't want to put up something only to have the school or City complain and make you take it down. Good luck, and let me know what happens.

  • Lauren of Mom Home Guide
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Thanks! The school is OK with the fence slats, but they said they don't want any vines. They didn't complain when I had the fence tarp up before.

  • Sondra A
    on Jun 19, 2013

    If they are ok with the fence slats I would go with those! Once the slats are in you can do decorative things on your side of the fence. And I would still consider plants for interest and added privacy. Depends on what you like and grows well in your area - lilac bushes get good sized and smell wonderful or go the green non-flowering bushes for simplicity. There are also some really cute ideas on here for plant stands/shelves/partial sheds.

  • Gabriele Sovers
    on Jun 19, 2013

    In my opinion tarps, plastic or the slats, is pretty tackey and unattractive. Plant some rhodidendrums or some other flowering bush that doesn't require any attatchments to the fence.

  • Rosalie M
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Lauren, I am very interested in the suggestions you get and your ultimate decision. I have a similar situation next to a drive thru for a busy donut shop. I'd like to hide my yard too.

  • Joy
    on Jun 19, 2013

    You can buy bamboo fencing in rolls that can be easily attached to the chain link with cable ties. It will last for a number of years and make a nice look.

  • N Green
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I agree Leland Cypress is an ideal screening tree. It is an evergreen so it screens in the winter too. It is also a good tree for small wild animals, and birds for the winter. I have used these at two homes and they are wonderful screening plants. Make sure you place them as far apart as the directions indicate, because they do get big around, besides tall. You can get them at Lowes. They grow a few feet a year.

  • Betsy Bodrero
    on Jun 19, 2013

    We have a chain link fence also. This is what we did for privacy & it's worked for 35 years. On the north and south side of our property we planted lilac bushes & snowball bushes. You can not see through them....and they do send up suckers that can be replanted else where. They provide shade, lovely smells, and a blind view to anything on either side. The far back has pine trees and they finish the total privacy package.

  • Lauren of Mom Home Guide
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Hello! I am leaning toward the lattice. I already spent a lot on my bushes, so I have to leave them there. I have a new fence tarp, but I worry it blocks too much sun (from the west) for the bushes. So I most likely won't put it up. (The house blocks the eastern sun.) I might put up two lattice panels on the part of the fence behind the patio. I might also amend the soil to make the bushes grow faster! Thanks for all the input! :)

  • Dannielle Molesworth
    on Jun 19, 2013

    We took old mini blinds and are weaving them in our chain link fence at an angle. Looks great so far and cost only time.

  • Jan Pate
    on Jun 19, 2013

    You can buy the strips to insert diagonily inside the fence for privacy. It works because I have them.

  • Dannielle Molesworth
    on Jun 19, 2013

    The mini blind stirps are thinner and allow better airflow. Not to mention free! ;)

  • Linda Neal
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Plant arborvitaes.They are an evergreen and they grow tall and spread and make a fence in no time.We did this to shield our front yard and pool from the people driving by and it is lovely year round and takes no care.When they get large enough,you can either trim or cut to make a hedge.I prefer the look of a tree.This is in the N.E.,but don't see why they won't grow other places.No care and so pretty and thick.

  • Marguerite S
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I've seen bamboo reeds used before. They actually make a roll of them that you can attach to the chain link.

  • Hope
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Nothing like a slanted wood fence to handle that problem.

  • Margaret J
    on Jun 21, 2013

    Bamboo fencing is great also but it will last maybe a season or 2 .. I have it.. Like I mention before lattice work.... or you can just get single fence from HD or Lowes also..

  • Lynda
    on Jul 13, 2013

    Look up DIY lace chain link. Its pretty. You could also use actual lace curtains stretched over the fence. You can sometimes find these at thift stores and whipstitch or hot glue to fence

  • Lauren of Mom Home Guide
    on Jul 13, 2013

    Thanks, Lynda! I will check it out.

  • Gabriel D
    on Jul 14, 2013

    Depending on the material you used ; you could stencil paint any number of things pale green ferns, bracken which is basically a fern on a tall stalk. Reed grass and/or bamboo stencils. Also fill in some barrren areas with some small to medium shrubbery like bottle rush; small maples and heather clumps. Anything to give a constant green and that flowers for a pleasant change and something to look forward to once a year. I hope yhis can be of help.

  • Lauren of Mom Home Guide
    on Aug 31, 2015

    Thanks, Elizabeth! I will check it out.

  • Elizabeth Sagarminaga
    on Mar 8, 2016

    In my opinion, smart landscaping solutions to keep wandering eyes and noise pollution out. Chain link fence can add privacy to your yard. Good thing nowadays you can find a range of chain link fence slat options that will block those openings in the fencing and give the chain link an entirely new look. If you have a small space between your house and the street, try putting a low fence in front. It gives the illusion that your house is farther from the street than it really is, and it also makes for a great space for planting flowers and vines. Good idea would sure save some money.

  • Carole
    on Mar 8, 2016

    Use shade cloth. It comes on a roll from the hardware store and you can cut it to fit. Use clips that you knock into the fence posts to hold it in place - a row of them down each post and use zip ties to stop it flapping - if you pull tight when you tack it down it will last a long while and won't lift in strong winds. If you double the layer you won't see through it at all. We used this solution for the same problem till our Photinia hedge grows in. Ours has been in place almost a year now.

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