Sue B
Sue B
  • Hometalker
  • Richmond, VA
Asked on May 8, 2012

Need advice on what flower/plants to plant

DeniseMaryDouglas Hunt
+10

Answered

I am disabled, so I need to have a garden that's easy to care for. Are there any flowers/plants that require less care than others? I know nothing about gardening. Do you have any suggestions? I live in the Richmond, VA area. The first 1/2 of the day, the garden gets sun. I guess the rain is about average here.
Thank you!
12 answers
  • Douglas Hunt
    on May 9, 2012

    Sue, it would help to know what types of plants you most want to grow. Do you want flowers or vegetables, for example, or both? Do you want annuals that will provide a lot of color but that will have to be replaced every year, or perennials that will come back year after year? How much space do you have? Do you have access to supplemental water? Raised beds are wonderful way to improve the accessibility of gardens. Is it possible someone might be able to build some for you? (Sorry to answer your question with so many questions.)

  • Sue B
    on May 9, 2012

    I would like flowers, if possible, or nice looking plants. I don't really want flowers that only bloom for a week or so and then drop off. I don't know what annuals are. I've never had a garden before.

  • Janna A
    on May 9, 2012

    Annuals are just for that year, perennials stay (p for permanent). If getting up and down is an issue, Id surely do a raised bed. I did a roll up planter for an assisted living home, the tenants loved it. they could roll their wheelchairs right under it and be right there with their plants. If youre mobile, I suggest planter benches or with a large rock next to it, a decorative chair, something fun and whimsy. As for care, theres always gonna be weeds, Id rather pull em than use chemicals. I use landscape fabric in my veggie garden and the lil buggers still find a way to grow. Sue, your options are endless! Happy Gardening!

  • Sue B
    on May 9, 2012

    Would you have to replant annuals each year?

  • Sue B
    on May 9, 2012

    Douglas the area is about 1 1/2 feet deep by about 20 feet or so.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on May 10, 2012

    Sue, yes, annuals have to replanted every year, although sometimes nature does this for you, as the seeds drop. Your space isn't very wide, so you'll want to keep the plants' mature size in mind. You could start with some perennials like black-eyed susans and coneflowers, which bloom for a long time and will come back every year, and intersperse some annuals like zinnias, celosias and the dwarf version of cleome (the regular version may get too large for the space). These are all easy-care plants that are pretty drought-resistant once they get going. You will have to give them regular water until that time. Good luck!

  • Sue B
    on May 17, 2012

    Douglas, Is there a better time of day/year to plant the perennials and annuals? Thank you!

  • Douglas Hunt
    on May 18, 2012

    You can generally plant perennials as soon as the ground can be worked in spring. Fall is another good time for planting them as we generally get plenty of moisture then and the plant is naturally sending its energy into its roots, which helps them get established. There are generally spring, summer and fall annuals, and you basically plant them when garden centers have them. If you can avoid planting in the hottest time of day, or direct sun, that's always advantageous. Make sure to water your plants thoroughly as soon as they're planted and that they get regular deep watering until established.

  • Sue B
    on May 19, 2012

    Douglas, do you need to add anything to the soil?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on May 20, 2012

    Sue, your best strategy would be to take a sample of the soil where you intend to put your garden, and have that tested. You tell them what you intend to grow there and they give you recommendations based on that. I think it's almost always a good idea to work in organic matter, but they can test for that as well. Your local Cooperative Extension office can supply the boxes and the forms, or you'll find more information online at: http://www.soiltest.vt.edu/

  • Mary
    on Aug 7, 2015

    depending on how big u want them..... ground cover; ajuga, phlox and creeping thyme, tall; phlox, blackened susans and cornflowers, shade; hostas, viginia bluebells, Astilbe, Hellebore, Bleeding Heart, just a few suggestions

  • Denise
    on Aug 12, 2015

    If you are disabled, maybe container gardening would be good for you. Lowes gives away wooden electrical and cable spools. You could fill the center with one plant, and have a place to sit while you take care of it, or, put several containers on the surfaces of the spool. Elevating your garden will keep you from having to bend down too far, and falling over. If you can put flower pots on tabletops, instead of hanging, that would help too.

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