La Mac
La Mac
  • Hometalker
  • Tulsa, OK
Asked on Jun 18, 2013

Front Flower Bed, Need Ideas Please

Sahirah FoxLinda TDavid C
+63

Answered

I had a small dogwood tree here and the winter got it after 10 yrs. I would love something like that or another small blooming tree that would do well in full hot sun in the summer, No shade here.
front flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscape
66 answers
  • Trent-Tonya Sharp
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Fringe tree is pretty

  • Gail Salminen
    on Jun 18, 2013

    @La Mac how do flowering crab apples or cherries do in your area. They have magnificant blooms in the spring and some foilage turns red in the fall. You could also do an ornamental garden with a tall ornamental grass in the center - choose one with big plumes and surround with barberry bushes which have a lovely reddish leaf, use a shredded mulch around it - low maintenance. Be sure to let us know what you decide.

  • La Mac
    on Jun 18, 2013

    Gail, Im not sure on either trees you mentioned. We get hot sun and heat in the summertime, and cold winters. Im sure they would both do well. Thank you so much for the suggestions.. I will be sure to let you know... Trent-Tonya Sharp, I am looking at pics right now on that tree. Beautiful..... Is says part shade in the info.... Would it thrive in full sun? That spot does not get any shade at all..

  • Trent-Tonya Sharp
    on Jun 18, 2013

    My mom has Fringe trees and they get full sun and are so pretty she lives in zone 8 hope that helps

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Jun 18, 2013

    How about a Chaste Tree or a Tree Form Hydrangea which would leave you room for planting underneath. The Limelight Hydrangea will take a sun location. Here is a link to some information on the Chaste Tree and the picture below is a picture of my Tree Form Hydrangea from last year.http://www.duncheons.com/showcase_plant/october_2011/october_2011_showcase.html

    front flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Gail Salminen
    on Jun 19, 2013

    @La Mac we have a crab apple in the front yard with full sun and very frigid winters and temps in the summer can go as high as 90 degrees. I plant cleome (my favourite annual) and impatiens below it.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I love Donna's idea of a chaste tree. I have one and it is definitely a summer show-stopper. They thrive in sun and heat. Here's a picture of the blooms on mine.

    front flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscape, Vitex agnus castus Shoal Creek
  • Caley's Culinaries
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Do you know for sure the tree died from cold? If it died from a disease, you will want something in a different family. Chaste tree (vitex) is an awesome choice! They grow in the medians in Charleston. Really hard to kill!

  • Rosemary Hesse
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I love Rose of Sharon which is a hibiscus bush. Mine is about 10yrs. old now and it is low maintenance. It survives all climates. I cut mine back every fall and it gives me more blooms every year. Wish I had a picture to send you but I am sure you could find one on0line. Good Luck.

  • Glenna Kennedy
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I think it all depends on size and color. You have some larger evergreens there already. A flowering crab unless it's a dwarf variety can get huge albeit has beautiful color when in blossom and then the red leaves/bark afterwards. I have a rose of Sharon bush and tree which again are great when in blossom but that isn't till later in the summer then they bloom till frost. All of these survive cold Canadian winters and hot summers. Also do you like strict form? I was thinking a boxwood hedge all around the exterior circle kept trimmed to no taller than 24 inches and then a flowering tree/bush in the center but that's very manicured looking and very green. Do you want color? A variegated dogwood (green and white leaves) are pretty and can be kept pruned so as to not get huge, planted at the back of the circle with other smaller (dwarf variety) bushes in front. Wegelia, spirea, maybe some stella d'oro lilies, barberry is beautiful, loads of color, can be kept small and again like full sun and can survive cold winters. I found out last year that they are producing alot of dwarf variety shrubs and bushes for subdivisions now because lots are smaller and those huge growing bushes just don't fit in. It's all a matter of taste.

  • Glenna Kennedy
    on Jun 19, 2013

    La Mac below are photos (I hope) lol of gardens that I have been redoing with combinations of bushes and a few perennials. I've changed my mantra to less is more and just let the bushes fill in the empty spots.

    front flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscapefront flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscapefront flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Mags
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Place a bird bath in center, then surround with fill sun annuals in summer. Glenna is right less is more, especially when you get older.

  • Carolyn
    on Jun 19, 2013

    A dwarf crape myrtle would be a nice colorful contrast to your evergreens.

  • Sharon Stanfield
    on Jun 19, 2013

    how about a weeping cherry tree?

  • Elaine G
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Seems to me that you need something colorful. How about a flowering red Crepe Myrtle tree.

  • Sharon H
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I'm in WI and just saw my first winter hardy Magnolia tree and am searching for one. Such beautiful blossoms but the tree is pretty compact and according to an owner of one, requires only a small amt of pruning. He had his growing in a brick circle like yours.

    front flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Corrina Austin
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I would so do a althea (aka rose of Sharon) very hardy easy to shape mine are over 30 yrs old, have purple and pink and give away starts all the time

  • Judy B
    on Jun 19, 2013

    a chilopsis (desert willow)tolerates heat well and is hardy to zone 6 and has a long bloom time. Rose of Sharon is an option as well as crape myrtle.

  • Bonnie G
    on Jun 19, 2013

    crepe myrtle is beautiful and so hardy in the sun. Personally I love the Red ones but they come in alot of beautiful colors and blooms for a really long time.

  • Wanda
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Smoke Tree, full sun, not extremely tall, two colors.

  • Connie Whitehead
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Japanese Maple tree...There are so many to choose from and offers seasonal color.

  • Paula K
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Chitalpa trees are very drought and heat resistant. They have a beautiful bloom that comes on mid summer. We have one but are planning to plant another one in the back yard.

  • Bonnye Manning
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Crepe Myrtle some spell Crape Myrtle...comes in wonderful colors. We have them all over Central Texas. Bloom once a year for a long time, usually in June. We cut them back in February.

  • Mar187819
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Looks like you get a good amount of sun. If you want something smaller, more ornamental, perhaps a weeping mulberry or cherry. If you want a larger, more stately tree, Honey Locust's grow pretty fast yet are strong. Bald Cypress don't grow quite as quickly, but are attractive with fern-like leaves. I'm especially fond of Locust & Cypress trees because when the leaves fall, they're easily picked up with a lawn mower---low maintenance!! :-)

  • Mary gonzalez
    on Jun 19, 2013

    A snowball bush should do well in Ok. It can be trained into a small ornamental tree and it is stunning when it blooms.

  • Judith Grise
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I didn't see anyone mention the options of Yoshino Cherry or Kwanza Cherry trees. I don't know if they would grow in your part of the country. I live in zone 7a and have a Kwanza Cherry tree in our front yard. It really is a show stopper! Cars routinely stop in front of the house to admire it when in full bloom and the neighbor children like to come lay under it and make wishes. Washington, DC has the beautiful Yoshino Cherry trees throughout the city which people come to see each year.

  • Brenda Ellingwood
    on Jun 19, 2013

    i had a smoke tree in bangor maine in direct sun burgandy beautiful!!!!!

  • Anne N
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Go native! Redbud is gorgeous in the spring, but needs shade. Try a pawpaw -- purple spring blossoms & yellow fall foliage. Chickasaw plum (white blooms in spring, edible fruit). What kind of dogwood did you have? Flowering or roughleaf? Or try the Mexican plum (white blooms)

  • Donna Wozniak
    on Jun 19, 2013

    I'm a huge fan of the Lilac Bush. We plan on planting one this fall in place of the large apple tree we lost a few years ago. Also it will be of remembrance of my Dad...it was his favourite!!!

  • Betsy Bodrero
    on Jun 19, 2013

    Golden Chain Tree

  • Luis
    on Jun 19, 2013

    How about a Crape Myrtle they do fine in full sun and they come in a variety of colors from red pink, white, purple.

  • Linda Morrell
    on Jun 19, 2013

    My JAPANESE MAPLE 'CORAL BARK' Acer palmatum 'Sango Kaku' is on the South side, in full sun, all day long. It is a slow grower and will not get HUGE like Crepe Myrtle, which will overtake your whole yard in no time at all! Sango Kaku Japanese Maple aka Coral Bark Maple. is known for its striking red bark in the fall and winter.The leaves are mostly green with reddish and pinkish tinges when unfolding, becoming medium green in summer. Sango Kaku is a very attractive small to medium size tree. My tree is on the South side and gets sun all day long. It's beautiful all year long, but it is a slow grower. http://www.soonerplantfarm.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantDetail&plant_id=47

  • Namaws
    on Jun 19, 2013

    a flowering double cherry, I live in hot Oklahoma and mine do well, lovely tree

  • Mary Scott
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Crepe Myrtle or a Kousa Dogwood.

  • Marie Gines
    on Jun 20, 2013

    why no put a fruit tree dwarf is no to big like apple, pear, almond, mango dwarf,

  • Jane Burkhart
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Crepe Myrtle--small one. Grows to about 10-12 feet. I have one in my fromt yard and is beautiful when in bloom.

  • Theresa J
    on Jun 20, 2013

    I would suggest a flowering peach. No fruit forms, but it has beautiful, fluffy pink blooms. It stays a small tree.

  • Sherry Merrill
    on Jun 20, 2013

    A large -tall thin leaved WEEPING WILLOW....:)

  • Nanci Burroughs
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Kousa dogwood (blooms later and longer) or maybe a crabapple

  • Laura H
    on Jun 20, 2013

    There is a new crepe myrtle out called black diamond. It has dark purple leaves and comes with either dark red or light pink flowers. They only get about 10 feet tall. Perfect for that size space and for the heat. Japanese maple, like people are suggesting, need shade and are an understudy tree. Bradford pears are too large and are trash trees - although beautiful, they have very weak branches and tend to break and fall on homes. Desert Willow would be a nice one as well and don't need much water, and only get about 15 ft. tall. You might try looking up your state agricultural office online and see if they have something on good native trees for your area. I live in North Texas and I go to the Texas A&M Forestry Service website and put in my criteria for what I'm looking for and it then lists trees that would meet that. Hope this helps!

  • Marty G
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Crape Myrtle they come in different colors.

    front flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Anne Belline
    on Jun 20, 2013

    I agree with Marty G, Crape Myrtle is a great choice. My neighbors have several and they are beautiful. I have lost several trees due to storm damage and would like to replace with different colors of crape myrtles.

  • Susan Cryor
    on Jun 20, 2013

    i like the golden chain tree, they are beautiful! Or a Korean dogwood. Please tell me what you have growing to the right of your photo. The red flowering plant?

  • Bonnie F
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Crape Myrtle - lots of beautiful colors - blooms prolifically in the hot summer sun - looks cool and lovely.

  • Barbara Dean
    on Jun 20, 2013

    You NeVER cut back a crape myrtle tree!!!!!!!!!

  • Barbara Dean
    on Jun 20, 2013

    There are so many beautiful colors of crape myrtle from whites to pinks to the deepest reds. Train it to have three or five main limbs and take off all the remailing shoots that come up from the ground. Never cut or top or prune the tips of the limbs. In a few years you will have a beautiful small tree to replace the one you lost!!!!!

  • Yvonne McKinley
    on Jun 20, 2013

    I agree with Barbara Dean..I have several Crape Myrtles and all are pruned like a tree. esp. the 20 ft and 15 ft. ones. I have a 5 ft. that is in bush style and stays the same every year. Red Buds are good too and usually don't grow more than 15 ft.

  • Gabriel D
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Crape Myrtle is a splendid tree that looks great most of the year resembling a friut tree such as plum or cherry yet with a far more flowery show.

  • Gabriel D
    on Jun 20, 2013

    Amazing testimony to the magjfigance of Crape Myrtles. I hadn't checked out any other replies before I made mine and then I began reading other peoples suggestions and discovered the popularity of this tree. So cool when it all comes together.

  • Luis
    on Jun 20, 2013

    The best thing about the Crape Myrtle it grows in very different climates, I brought a root from my sister's in Miami now is as tall as my house and I live in Connecticut.

    front flower bed need ideas please, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Diann Toler
    on Jun 22, 2013

    Most of these trees are for warmer climates. What would you suggest for zone 3? We tried redbud and dogwood, thinking some kind of crabapple? Especially like fruit for birds.

  • Landscape Artistry, LLC
    on Jun 22, 2013

    how about a Corkscrew Willow. nice winter interest.

  • La Mac
    on Jun 23, 2013

    Susan Cryor, to the right of the yard is a red climbing rose bush. It is weird. It was white, and I wanted a different color. I had this rose bush for 10 yrs. My husband cut it down last year. A single sprig shot up through the ground and this is what it is now. It bloomed last month and had hundreds of blooms and the heavy rain and storms we got, beat the blooms off. I don't see any new buds after pruning off the dead blooms. But my other rose bushes are getting new buds. They are not climbing roses either.

  • Luis
    on Jun 24, 2013

    Most Roses are grafted on to that type of red rose your husband probably cut all the grafted plant so now u are just getting flowers from the original rose and they do bloom very profusely

  • Susan Cryor
    on Jun 24, 2013

    wow, nice to know...so buy one and cut below the graft?

  • Sharon
    on Jun 24, 2013

    YOU can do that,but most of the host plants are hardier,but not usually prettier than graft... you got a beautiful surprise,though...And I think any of above posts have great ideas for tree and you could do cherry,I guess,Diann in NE... but I do like willow idea,too... corkscrew 1 of my favorites...

  • Hortensia S
    on Jun 24, 2013

    I think that Pink or Yellow roses all around and a crape myrtle or fountain in the center will be beauteful,My brother did his and is a show stoper.Sorry i dont have a photo to show you.

  • Jane Burkhart
    on Jun 24, 2013

    How about a crepe myrtle? Comes in lots of colors and the small one grows to about 10-12ft.

  • Rosemary Hesse
    on Jun 26, 2013

    I have a crape Myrtle and it is beautiful so I agree with the suggestions but I also have a Hibiscus named Rose of Sharon and it is one of my favorites. Nee to cut it back each fall but then the next year you get double the blooms. Both of these are low maintenance. Good Luck

  • Diann Toler
    on Jun 27, 2013

    We have several corcscrew willows and they're great. I wanted something with interest for the birds, and flowers, in zone 3 with heavy wind/sun exposure.

  • La Mac
    on Jun 28, 2013

    Hortensia, what type of roses? I love roses...

  • Pamela Dyer
    on Jul 9, 2013

    We bought a weeping cherry tree and put it in the front. It is beautiful and seems to love the sun!

  • David C
    on Jul 13, 2013

    Formosa Tree

  • Linda T
    on Jul 14, 2013

    One of my favourites (that I don't have but am craving) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crepe_myrtle. It's SO colourful and seems to be hardy, as it's ubiquitous here in PA, MD and more, where we can have very hot summers and winter blizzards. I didn't read the whole page, but I bet the butterflies and hummingbirds love it. I would plant vinca (ground cover) under it, or white alysum, even striped hostas that seem to last all summer and don't mind shade, or tree roots using all their nourishment. Lily of the valley would be wonderful too. Some scent to fill the air before the summer and they spread wonderfully too, so if you have a friend with some, just ask for a few 'runner roots'. You will be rewarded. Other suggestion, Japanese maple with it's glorious red leaves and some species have wonderful drooping shapes, perfect for the front lawn, rose of sharon (though Japanese beetles devour them as soon as they bloom) I've only seen one here, but I grew up with a 'golden chain tree' in the UK. (We called it laburnum) and I played with the little pods full of 'fairy peas', though they are poisonous, so you need to have a stay at home mum which mine was.

  • Sahirah Fox
    on Jun 4, 2015

    I have seen Crepe Myrtle growing wild in the woods NC and it is so beautiful. I would love to have one in my yard, someday!

Your comment...