Why Chalk Paint is Worth Buying (rather Than Making Homemade)

I paint vintage furniture for a living using chalk paint and this is my opinion. I'm often asked, why do you spend money on buying chalk paint when you can make your own? It is true that you can make your own chalk paint, many folks do. However, I prefer to buy mine for the following reasons; I want to know that when a customer had purchased my transformed furniture, that the paint is going to perform in the long term. I also want to predict exactly what color I am getting when I open a can of paint. I also want to be able to tell my customers that the paint I use is eco-friendly and safe for everyone, from babies up to seniors. And, I'm not so fond of heavy sanding and homemade chalk paint requires a lot of sanding. I want to distress using a wet towel not sandpaper!
why chalk paint is worth buying rather than making homemade, painted furniture, Testing the new Annie Sloan Antibes Green chalk paint on a small stool Dark wax was applied directly over the color
Testing the new Annie Sloan Antibes Green chalk paint on a small stool. Dark wax was applied directly over the color.
why chalk paint is worth buying rather than making homemade, painted furniture, I love the smooth finish of this ASCP charcoal black chalk paint with dark wax directly over it
I love the smooth finish of this ASCP charcoal black chalk paint with dark wax directly over it.
why chalk paint is worth buying rather than making homemade, painted furniture, CeCe Caldwell s Chalk Paint transformed this old Jacobean sideboard
CeCe Caldwell's Chalk Paint transformed this old Jacobean sideboard.

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  • Porta Verde Studio Porta Verde Studio on Jun 29, 2013
    Excuse me if I've offended you, that wasn't my intent. I took a look at your blog and you have some lovely pieces that are chalk-painted. I won't go into about whether ASCP is a better a finish because there are those that love and those that don't. My main point is the price of ASCP and it's claims of what it can do. You may be able to get away with no prep work if the piece is fairly worn but it does not stick well to a shiny oil varnish. Those should be lightly sanded. Also the ASCP wax just doesn't last. It will need to be reapplied and won't provide adequate protection over time on something like a dining table. My thinking is that you would do just as well to make your own chalk paint and coat with a satin poly or to use other products to duplicate the look. Just my humble opinion of course.
  • White Oak Studio Designs White Oak Studio Designs on Jun 29, 2013
    No problem, really. Actually I wasn't offended and I apologize in return if it I sounded defensive. It seems to me that lot of times directness on the Internet sounds "offended." But in reality its just being expedient. It's a good question in truth and I was simple explaining my personal why. I actually do quite a LOT of prep work even with chalk paint, because I am quite fussy and want a high standard/quality. I'm not so much into chippy so want a pretty smooth surface, high quality repairs etc. Yes, any wax I've used (even Johnson's paste wax brand for example) does need to be reapplied every year of so, depending on use etc. I don't use homemade chalk paint for a couple of reasons mostly because I don't want to do all the sanding required but it certainly is an option. I am not sure of its VOC friendly nature-just haven't done any research regarding that. No toxins is very important to me as we have a lot of caner in my family. And I've seen too many friends (oil painters that got sick.) I'm into organic, GMO free foods whole foods etc. I believe you pay now in product costs or you likely pay later in ill health and medical bills. I paint in my art studio and quite frankly I just don't want the sanding/sawdust/mess etc. in the same place I paint. In Michigan I can sand/paint outdoors several months of the year but many months, I am stuck indoors. Then there is the issue of carrying heavy pieces in and outside. Just easier to use Annie Sloan or Cece Caldwell's. Though I am an "experimenter" and there may come a day I do make my own, at least for my own furniture...we shall see.
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