Jane B
Jane B
  • Hometalker
  • Victoria, VA
Asked on May 22, 2012

Severe storm leak

HandyANDY - Handyman & All Repairs, LLCKMS WoodworksWoodbridge Environmental Tiptophouse.com
+10

Answered

A severe thunderstorm just concluded at my home. During the height of the storm, rain was blowing sideways. I noticed spattered water in the doorway of my master bath and looked up to find water beaded on the top of the door frame, which was formerly a window and is the point of attachment to the house (the bath was added five years ago). I've never had a leaking problem before, there's no sign/stain of previous leakage, and while standing there as the storm subsided, no more water came through. What should I do to seal the opening this came through (although I'm not sure where it did, except somewhere along the roofline).
13 answers
  • Home Repair Tutor
    on May 23, 2012

    Jane, Would you be able to take a few photos and add captions. Sorry to hear about your water leak, it's always frustrating to find these problems.

  • If the addition attaches to the side of the original roof, the flashing perhaps where the new roof meets the wall area may have not been high enough. Blowing rain can go uphill really easy and over the top of the flashing causing the leak that you have. The only thing I can advise you without looking at it, is not to have a reaction to taring up every space between the siding and roof. Sealing the space between the roof and bottom of the siding is one of the biggest mistakes I have seen when it comes to trying to stop leaks. Even sealing valleys in an attempt to stop a leak only causes more issues then it solves. Water must always drain out. And putting any kind of tar or caulk on the roof shingle joints, or between roof and wall areas where you would think the leak is occurring will only cause water to build up and not drain out. Resulting in more hidden damage and costs in the long run. The only tried and true method other then opening the wall or ceilings is to take a hose when its dry out and spray one area at a time mimicking the rain storm in direction until you begin to see the leak. This will narrow your issue down and result in the proper identification of where its happening and help you make the right repair the first time. You must also remember. Water can leak on one side of the house and show up on the other. If the door was an old window. your leak may be way up top, far beyond where you think the leak is now coming from. In any case do not simply tar or caulk every opening you see until your sure that is where the leak has come from, and then take that area apart and fix it correctly, not with just a tar or caulk patch.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on May 23, 2012

    This is more common that some folks think. When windows are replaced (or doors) and the siding is now completely removed "proper" flashing methods are often skipped because it is a lot of work to remove all of the siding for that area and layer up normal levels of flashing / water proofing etc. Most of these installs are just band aid jobs with caulk trying to fill to roll of proper flashing etc. It would be my guess that this caulk has failed and would need to to upgraded.

  • Melodie M
    on May 23, 2012

    You are going to want to dry out what got wet..especially if it went into the wall or you could get mold growth. you might be able to seal it with "Flex seal" and then paint over it...but a proper install should take care of it as well.

  • Jane B
    on May 23, 2012

    HRT, there's really nothing to take pictures of. My neighbor, a former roofer and now an inspector for an insurance company, came over this morning because he saw me outside last night eyeing the addition between downpours (it went on for hours). He went up on the roof and reported that the high wind had lifted the shingles around the house/addition joint slightly and allowed a little water to get in. He checked inside and didn't see a problem because there was no sign of water damage. I have an attic entrance in my bathroom for the HVAC venting, and he looked up in there to make sure everything was all right -- again, no sign of water damage, not even any signs of dampness from last night. He felt around and said he only felt a tiny bit of dampness that should resolve today or tomorrow. He also said the shingles will flatten back down with a day of sunshine. So it seems everything is all right. I appreciate all the answers and concern!

  • Home Repair Tutor
    on May 23, 2012

    Sounds like you're in good shape Jane. Have a great holiday weekend.

  • Bernice H
    on May 24, 2012

    I bet you gave a big sigh of relief! Nice neighbor ...with pretty good news! And thanks for the post , I learned a lot here, and will share with my non handy hubs!

  • KMS Woodworks
    on May 24, 2012

    I would still keep an eye on it....If you neighbor just looked and did not "do" anything...what is to prevent this from happening again when the next storm comes in? Check out this article I wrote on storm proofing your roof. http://www.networx.com/article/storm-proof-your-roof

  • I agree with KMS, keep an eye on it...wind damaged shingles are just that...wind damaged shingles that need to be sealed with something like Thru the Roof elastromeric roof sealant....or replaced. They will not just "warm" up an lay back down....once damaged....the wind will hit them again & again until they tear off.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on May 25, 2012

    To add to Handy's comments....Shingles only comprise a "part" of the entire roof "system". The individual component parts each play their own role in keeping the rain out. Underlayment, flashing, shingles, drip edge...etc....as a stand alone item none will do the job....it is the combined effects of the entire roof system that works... when one component of the system fails the entire system is compromised until that failed component is fixed.

  • There is still another issue here. Even if the shingles blew up and allowed rain to get under, this can happen even if they do not lift. The seal tab does not prevent water from blowing up under the shingle. The concern here is that the roof pitch is not enough or the exposure is not proper to compensate for the flatter pitch. Still another concern is the flashing methods used and if who ever did the roof used ice and water shield assuming this was done in the past 15 years or so. But KMS your correct there are many parts of the roof system and although only one part seems to be at fault, I have a feeling its something else that should have worked and did not which is really the bigger issue here. If things were correct you should be able to blow the entire tab off and still not have any leak. personally I think there is a incorrectly installed or faulty flashing issue here. And the shingle has only brought it to light.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on May 26, 2012

    I have seen many ( and repaired) many roofs where courses of shingles were completely missing...yet there were no leaks...at least at the time of my repair......this is due to underlayment and flashing doing their part. With those parts exposed they will eventually fail as the shingles provide the primary level of protection ( UV, hail, snow rain wind...) Poor Roof pitch and flashing mistakes are leading issues for leaks.

  • That's a good point...what kind of pitch is on this roof? Post us a pic!

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