Carolyn B
Carolyn B
  • Hometalker
  • Bixby, OK
Asked on Jul 3, 2013

Tomato plants growing rapidly, but no blooms. Healthy green plants

Liliana WellsStaceyCarolyn B
+8

Answered

please help
11 answers
  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Jul 3, 2013

    sounds like too much nitrogen. Do you have any blooms at all? What type tomato is it?

  • Carolyn B
    on Jul 3, 2013

    Beef master plants have tripled in size. No blooms. They are in large pots

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Jul 3, 2013

    What type soil do you have them in? Have you fertilized them and if so, with what?

  • Carolyn B
    on Jul 3, 2013

    Help answer this question...miracle grow potting soil. Have not fertilized because they are looking so healthy and throwing so well

  • Carolyn B
    on Jul 3, 2013

    growing that is

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Jul 3, 2013

    hmm...I think they have too much nitrogen. It sounds like they are putting all their energy into the leafy green parts and none into the flowering fruiting parts. You can try some epsom salt and some type of bloom booster to see if you can encourage flowering.

  • Carolyn B
    on Jul 3, 2013

    thank you

  • Stacey
    on Jul 4, 2013

    Tomato plants need the temperature to drop to 56 degrees Fahrenheit or lower at night for the plant to bloom. If you plant too late in the season, the plant grows wildly in the sun, but never produces flowers or fruit. Try planting earlier by using a green house to help the plant become sufficiently mature in the early season to produce flowers and fruit. Good Luck!!

  • Carolyn B
    on Jul 4, 2013

    thanks Stacey. We have been having hot temps at night ever since I planted them

  • Stacey
    on Jul 4, 2013

    Carolyn, if you switch to cherry tomatoes in the spring, you won't have a problem. Beef steak tomatoes are more finicky about temperature. You can also wait to plant Beef steak tomato plants at the end of summer. When the plant is fully mature, the cooler fall weather comes along, and it blooms continuously until the first frost.

  • Liliana Wells
    on Jul 5, 2013

    Two of my neighbors told me to knock of the "suckers". They look like little growths between the stems and the branches. Also, clip off the tip of each branch. I hope these suggestions work for you.

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