Diana Blazer
Diana Blazer
  • Hometalker
  • Morristown, TN
Asked on Jul 14, 2013

Chalk paint screw-up

ShariDeb NidayDiana
+5

Answered

I used the homemade recipe for chalk paint ( the unsanded grout) and I have totally ruined my antique table. The paint is rolling off as I try to wax it with johnsons paste wax. I am so disappointed in the way the paint is going on and I feel I should have sanded the table first since the paint is not adhering to the table. I need help! Does anyone out there have any suggestions that I can do to fix my problem? I am scared to try any other homemade chalk paint and I have several other projects that I want to do. Please help me with suggestions--Thank you .
6 answers
  • Shari
    on Jul 14, 2013

    I only tried homemade chalk paint once and wasn't thrilled with the results so I stopped before the waxing step. If you want to use regular interior latex paint, I've painted probably no less than 30 pieces of furniture that way. In your particular case, I would first suggest trying to get the wax off by sanding. Also, sand down and take off as much of the homemade chalk paint as you can--or at least the paint that isn't sticking. I can't really say why you had an adhesion problem but you obviously need to get it off before you proceed. Then, wipe the table down with a liquid sandpaper (also known as "deglosser") product. Apply one or two THIN coats of a good quality primer and allow to dry well. I like the Valspar Multi-purpose Latex Primer sold at Lowes. Zinsser 123 or Kilz will work too. Apply THIN coats of latex interior paint in the color of your choice until you have the coverage you desire. Latex paint does dry fast but still needs some time to "cure" so be careful with your piece until it has fully hardened. Distressing, glazing and applying a protective poly finish are all optional.

  • Reposhture Studio - Kim
    on Jul 14, 2013

    I use homemade chalkpaint all the time but I use plaster of paris as my mix-in. I have never had a problem with it. The paint may not be adhereing if the surface was a bit greasy or waxy to begin with. I would also sand it off as much as possible and then give it a good cleaning. Once completely dry try latex as Shari suggested or try the plaster of paris. My ratio is 1/4 plaster of paris with a little bit of water added. Then I add the latex color of choice. I mix it periodically while painting to keep it consistent and then I store it in Ball canning jars to keep it from hardening. I hope this helps!

  • Diana Blazer
    on Jul 18, 2013

    thank you both so much. I am going to get busy sanding!

  • Diana
    on Nov 3, 2013

    Did you get the table fixed? I have a great recipe for chalk paint and have never had issues.

    • Diana
      on Nov 16, 2013

      @Deb Niday I use ex: a sample size of paint (8ozs) 2 level tablespoons sanded grout and add 1 tablespoon warm water and stir. Always mix the grout and water separately, add to paint and stir. You can always add more water and or grout and water and make sure the paint is flat paint. I always sand lightly before I paint.

  • Deb Niday
    on Nov 16, 2013

    Also you will need to take some chalk and rub all over the surface after it dries. Then wipe off. This conditions the painted surface. Hope this helps as well.

  • Shari
    on Nov 16, 2013

    @Deb Niday I think you may be confused....or maybe posted your comment to the wrong post? Diana was painting a table with chalk paint, not chalk BOARD paint. They are two completely different things. Only chalk board paint/chalk boards are "seasoned" first for writing by rubbing chalk all over the surface. If not seasoned, a faint image or shadow of the writing will remain on the chalkboard after it has been erased. Chalk paint is simply used the change the color of something, much like latex paint, oil based paint, milk paint etc. Seasoning is NOT done with chalk paint.

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