Sunflower&Me
Sunflower&Me
  • Hometalker
  • New York, NY
Asked on Jul 4, 2016

Questions about using ASCP ( Annie Sloan Chalk Paint)

B. EnneBetsy BoeveSunflower&Me
+7

Answered

So thrilled to have found your site. I know I will learn much and apply more. Having recently discovered Annie Sloan Chalk paints, and getting ready to begin our pine coffee table. I wanted to know can I use "white" ASCP soft wax, followed
by "clear" ASCP soft wax.? Or do I need to use ASCP "white" chalk paint ,then use the clear soft wax paint? It seems for the look we are seeking the two waxes, may work best. Your opinion will certainly be appreciated.
this is the look  we are looking to create on our pine coffee table.
this is the look we are looking to create on our pine coffee table.
10 answers
  • Elly
    on Jul 5, 2016

    Hi I also used the Annie Slones paint . Actually I can't help you with the problem though I can help you with the link from this the shop which is specialized in this paint I'm sure she could help you https://www.shabbytreats.com/?gclid=CKaPxuqS3M0CFeop0wodrgcFFQ

  • Sunflower&Me
    on Jul 5, 2016

    Thanks, I will look into the link you provided.

  • Louise Adkins
    on Jul 5, 2016

    I've used AS paint before and I am aware of a clear wax she makes and then if you want to "antique" it you immediately cover with the dark wax and if you have it too dark for you desired look you go over those areas with the clear wax and it will remove some of the dark wax. Here is her website https://www.anniesloan.com/

  • Betsy Boeve
    on Jul 5, 2016

    I used chalk paint on a table top and got that look you are seeking. I first sanded the table, then applied the paint and wiped most of it off with a wet (wrung out) cloth. This technique worked great for me.

  • Sunflower&Me
    on Jul 5, 2016

    That was my thought, but I thought of the white wax, then the clear. In rubbing off certain areas it would antique it, at least I think it would. If I tried it this way. Hence my confusion 🙃

  • C
    on Jul 5, 2016

    This look doesn't require "chalk" paint. It can be done using regular white latex paint mixed with 50% water. Google "DIY white wash wood" Another alternative is using a grey wood stain, then use your white wax to seal it :-) PS. if you are worried about too much "whiteness" from the white wax... then apply clear first. Once it has dried, then apply the white wax. If you have areas with too much white, simply apply more clear to that spot to "erase" it

  • Sunflower&Me
    on Jul 5, 2016

    That's such great help. Thank you. Originally we comsidered white latex paint. Didnot know about using water to tone it done. Considered ASCP, because they have the look, we wanted. But, now hum......

  • Sunflower&Me
    on Jul 5, 2016

    The suggestions were so helpful in helping direct us with this project. We hope to gather the materials and give it a go soon.

  • Betsy Boeve
    on Jul 6, 2016

    If you go the latex route, use flat to get that chalk paint look.

  • B. Enne
    on Jul 21, 2016

    I have not used the chalk paint, my comment is in reference to whiteashing with latex. If you have knots in the wood, they will eventually bleed through the whitewash finish, if you use a regular watered-down latex. This happened on pine wainscoting that I had. The knots now have bright orangy halos. If you go that route, you may want to use a light coat of B-I-N red label shellac-based primer 1st. It is lightweight and milky, not heavy. That's what I will do to try and correct the problem.

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