Bev
Bev
  • Hometalker
  • Downers Grove, IL
Asked on Jul 16, 2013

Plant identification

PegJayJan
+23

Answered

My Japanese neighbor gave me these perennials. She said her sister sent her the seeds from Japan. I dearly love them, but when I give them to others they want to know what they are.
The flowers bloom right on the central stalk, not near the leaves. They are wonderful and spread well.
Does anyone know what they are called?
Can anyone tell me what this is called? It grows purple and dark pink.
Can anyone tell me what this is called? It grows purple and dark pink.
Here are the light pink ones.
Here are the light pink ones.
26 answers
  • Sia@South 47th
    on Jul 16, 2013

    Wish I could answer your question as to what this plant is, however I really like it! One of the "Garden Guru's" will help out for sure! xo

  • Bev
    on Jul 16, 2013

    It gets about 12 inches tall at it's maximum height. I guess I should pull back the camera for a full shot!

  • Barb Rosen
    on Jul 16, 2013

    Bev ~ this is Balsam or Touch-Me-Not, here's some info for you to read up on it : ) http://gardening-simplified.blogspot.com/2012/05/balsam-plant.html

  • Sia@South 47th
    on Jul 16, 2013

    Thank you Barb! It reminded me of some sort of Sweet Pea. ;)

  • Barb Rosen
    on Jul 16, 2013

    @Sia@South 47th ~ it is actually in the impatiens family and hails from the Himalayas and is a generous self-sower. Balsam is often used in old-fashioned cottage gardens.

  • Sia@South 47th
    on Jul 16, 2013

    @Barb Rosen many thanks for the great info! I may have to locate some for the front cottage! I'm assuming it is a fast grower? I need to chat with you anyway about the front yard, which is a disaster right now, since we have been focused on the inside reno.

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Jul 17, 2013

    From what I have seen so far, it isn't being effected with the Powdery Mildew disease that the impatien wallerenill are suffering from. One of my favorite childhood plants from my grandmother's garden.

  • Peg
    on Jul 17, 2013

    You're right Donna! I did not buy any impatiens this year because I don't want the mildew to affect my native touch-me-nots/jewelweed.

  • Maggie
    on Jul 18, 2013

    Balsam! I absolutely love these flowers!

  • Charlotte MacDiarmid
    on Jul 18, 2013

    Thanks for the name of these flowers. My neighbor gave me some plants and I couldn't not remember the name. I have had them in my garden years and years ago. I know the seeds spread to make more plants and they are very colorful.. I'm happy to have more of them..

  • Alice Harley-Wosnig
    on Jul 18, 2013

    It will have little seed pods after the blooms that are full of seeds. They pop open when they are touched...hence the Touch me nots. If you would like to have more next year, save a few and plant the seeds or share them with a friend. They are beautiful BTW

  • Alice Harley-Wosnig
    on Jul 18, 2013

    I always like this link for info and a lot of pictures. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/121244/

  • Jay
    on Jul 18, 2013

    Balsam!

  • S.venkatesan
    on Jul 18, 2013

    These are very tender plants, In India it is called kasi thumbai a herbal plant and these are flowering in different colours like, orange, violet ,pink ,yellow etc.,but unfortunately, idon't know the exact botanical name of the plant.

  • Claudia Pleskach
    on Jul 18, 2013

    What a blast from the past..... Love to have tender memories from my mom and grandmother's flower beds...

  • Nancy Hand
    on Jul 18, 2013

    Wow haven't seen these in a long time!! The old fashion Impatiens! :)

  • Deanna Riles-Cox
    on Jul 18, 2013

    This is a good article. The seed pods when held in the your hand will pop open. Fun to show kids.They start easily from seed. I'd love to have some again. http://flowers.about.com/od/Annual-Flowers/p/Balsam-Flowers-For-The-Heirloom-Garden.htm

  • Deanna Riles-Cox
    on Jul 18, 2013

    Connie they start every year from scattered seeds. Very easy to grow. I'm in KY and they flourished

  • Claudia
    on Jul 18, 2013

    I love, love, love Touch me Nots! My Mom always had them in her garden...I would love to have them in mine.

  • Juanita
    on Jul 18, 2013

    They are Balsam, or commonly called Touch-Me-Nots, because the seed pods, when touched, will make a little "popping" sound when they open. They are actually re-seeding annuals. You can collect the seeds to share, or to spread to a different area. An old-fashioned favorite, many old homes in the South have these in the gardens. I can remember my grandmother coming out & fussing at us kids for walking around her garden & popping the seed pods, because she was wanting to capture the seeds, haha!

  • Nancy Christopher-Morrison
    on Jul 18, 2013

    The ones who identified Balsam are correct...I have been growing them for years. Aggressive annuals they will reseed..( their seeds Pop out of their cover much to the delight of my grandchildren..we make a game of it every year!) and they are in the impatiens family. I grow them outside my fence and the deer leave them alone.

  • Karen walker
    on Jul 18, 2013

    yes these are Balsam. I save the seeds every year because the pods are so fun to pop! Every seed germinates! I don't reavlly need to plant them any longer because they spread the seeds on their own!

  • Beverly L
    on Jul 18, 2013

    After reconnecting with distant relative on fb she sent me a gift of seeds for this Balsam. The best part of this story...the original seeds came from my Grammy's garden 70 some years ago; given to 1 cousin; past to his daughter and now to me and many of the cousins all over the US. The most treasured gift we've ever received.

  • Jan
    on Jul 19, 2013

    touch-me-not love them here they reseed them self.

  • Jay
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Impatiens Balsamina!:)

  • Peg
    on Jul 24, 2013

    I had these growing on my other property, they came up every year in a variety of colors in the pink, white, purples ect..

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