Tami @ Curb Alert!
Tami @ Curb Alert!
  • Hometalker
  • Montgomery, TX
Asked on Jul 19, 2013

Recognize this plant?

April ECarolyn DavisAngie W
+48

Answered

These plants are growing like wildflowers in fields near our SouthEast Texas home. They are so pretty and I would like to transplant a few into the "field" part of our yard. Any ideas what type of plant this is? Poisonous or NonPoisonous? I am hoping to write more about my findings at http://tamicurbalert.blogspot.com, your input is appreciated!
Any idea what type of plants these are?
Any idea what type of plants these are?
Any idea what type of plants these are?
Any idea what type of plants these are?
They don't really grow sideways!  Let's just imagine...
They don't really grow sideways! Let's just imagine...
51 answers
  • Adrienne Sajecki
    on Jul 19, 2013

    Here is a link to USF horticultural info on it. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/lh044 they have chemicals listed to use. Good Luck! All this rain we have had, we are getting some type of fungus also!

  • Tami @ Curb Alert!
    on Jul 19, 2013

    Thanks Adriene! I'll check it out.

  • Elizabeth Hamaty
    on Jul 19, 2013

    they look like balloon flowers. A friend of mine has tons growing near a tank, her dad brings huge bunches home for her mom

  • Tami @ Curb Alert!
    on Jul 19, 2013

    Balloon Flowers? I'll have to look that one up! Thanks Elizabeth :)

  • Ouina
    on Jul 19, 2013

    From the pictures they look like Texas Bluebells. Go to Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Research Center's website. They have a lot of information on wildflowers and how to propagate. Also how to grow in your garden. I think this wildflower is the prettiest wildflower Central Texas has - they are spectacular and used to be endangered. Lots of luck!

  • Meg
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Those look exactly like the balloon flowers that I've put in a number of my flower beds! They're wonderful and not invasive (at least not here in Ohio). I collected seeds from one of my plants last year and was able to grow some in the back yard as well! I would LOVE to have them as neighbors!!!

  • Tami, I commented to you a few days ago and somehow it didn't post... Sorry. My mom and I used to pick these when I was a kid and she called them bluebells too. Now after having been a florist for almost 20yrs I know they are in the same family as lisianthus. How blessed you are that your new home is near a field of them! Brought back such sweet memories. Thank you 😊

  • Kelly Baird
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Those are definitely Texas Bluebells. Native wildflowers, they grow in fields, and are disappearing with development. Don't mow them down, they are so pretty. Good cut flowers too!

  • Su
    on Jul 20, 2013

    I just pick wild flowers the ones that are mostly all bloomed out and throw them into my bed they go to seed and next year there they are blooming....would love to have these I lived in TX my whole life but never saw these guess I was living in a part that these didn't grow...very pretty

  • June
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Thought it was platycodon (also balloon flower) but on closer look, I'm wrong. They are so pretty!

  • June
    on Jul 20, 2013

    hit this by mistake

  • Phyllis Naab Campofelice
    on Jul 20, 2013

    looks like lisianthis to me.

  • Mikell Paulson
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Phyllis, That is what I thought too! Lisianthis! Texas bluebell are in the family of Lupine! Different leaves!!

  • Nancy Christopher-Morrison
    on Jul 20, 2013

    They are definitely Lisianthus or Eustoma. Also known as Prairie Gentian or Texas Bluebell. Wonderful that you can find it in the wild, the hybrid varieties are fuller and larger. I have to start my seed in January and hope to have germination to have flowers by July. ( for Washington State) I also buy plugs from e-bay and purchased over 300 this year ( I resell most) so I am very familiar with this plant. If you try to buy them as a plant check out Burbees...$29.99 for 12 + 8.95 for shipping. Check out this link....http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/204510/

    , Here is a picture of lisianthus in my garden
  • Gladys Rhoads
    on Jul 20, 2013

    they grew as wid flowers with the buttercup in the spring in Washington state and went in the May day baskets every year when I was a child.

  • Paula Landua
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Texas Bluebell. They are very pretty, almost disappeared at one time here in Texas.

  • Kristin Peltonen
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Purple Loosestrife plant

  • Nancy Kruse
    on Jul 20, 2013

    not purple loosestrife - those are more of a reddish purple

  • Shawn B
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Prairie Gentian/Texas Bluebells/Eustoma grandiflorum/Lisianthus is what they are. Lovely.

  • Catherine F
    on Jul 20, 2013

    I say bluebells

  • Cathy Isabel-Johnson
    on Jul 20, 2013

    lisianthus is my guess. Been in the florist industry for many years. Love this cut flower !!

  • Laverda Gluszek
    on Jul 20, 2013

    I would say they are "BLUE BELLS" DO I WIN?

  • Carol
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Are they Texas bluebonnets?

  • Tami @ Curb Alert!
    on Jul 20, 2013

    Guys, thank you so much for your input. It is so helpful! :)

  • Bonnie Moore
    on Jul 20, 2013

    I am sorry after a closer look I find I was totally wrong not horsemint

  • Helen M
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Lisianthus, they are beautiful.

  • Nanci Burroughs
    on Jul 21, 2013

    A form of wild lisianthus

  • Angie W
    on Jul 21, 2013

    This is Texas Blubell

  • Angie W
    on Jul 21, 2013

    This is Baloon flower

  • Angie W
    on Jul 21, 2013

    I'd say Texas Blubells...

  • Jamie Wade-Matlock
    on Jul 21, 2013

    They are growing around here in pastures all over. I love them!

  • Theresa
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Lisianthus!

  • Kay C
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Whatever they are...I am in Missouri and have some that look a lot like these but smaller by my creek..and we call them blue bonnets..I tried to transplant them but difficult by time I get home their wilted..will consider the seed gathering...wanna swap...

  • Betty Wilmott
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Definitely Blue Bell which is the State flower of Texas. Despite the name some due appear to be purple. You will see a lot of them in the wild here in TX especially when in the country areas such as Cleveland, just about all of Parker and Kaufman counties, Where did you find it?

  • Candace Seaton
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Looks like lisianthus, which I have tried and failed to grow many times.

  • Tina Richardson
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Sorry, Betty Wilmott, but Blue Bell are not the Texas State Flower....that would be the Blue Bonnet as Our (Texas) State Flower.

  • Myrna Engle
    on Jul 21, 2013

    They are Prairie Gentains Bluebells

  • Nancy Vance
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Lisianthus beautiful as a cut flower

  • June
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Went to lisianthus and on the side was a picture of eustoma. That certainly looks like what you have and fits the description. What do you think?

  • Gwenyth Mumford
    on Jul 21, 2013

    I agree with Angie W. Texas Blubell.

  • Pat Dareneau
    on Jul 21, 2013

    not Blue Bonnet. there is a Painted Sage in Texas .

  • April E
    on Jul 21, 2013

    lisianthus or texas bluebell its a awesome wild flower down there aand a great cultivated garden and florist flower in many other areas

  • Mikell Paulson
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Blue Bonnets are from the lupine family That flower is is not a Blue bonnet! Might be a blue bell' but it looks like Lisianthus!

  • Donna James
    on Jul 21, 2013

    This looks like Prairie Gentian or Prarie Bluebell (Eustoma exaltatum). See: http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=EUEX5

  • Hazel Munnis
    on Jul 21, 2013

    BLUEBONNETS are the STATE FLOWER of TEXAS!!!!!

  • Rick Meszaros
    on Jul 21, 2013

    you are all wrong. its a plant growing in a pasture. A pasture is for cows. cows eat plants in a pasture Then they poop plants in the pasture. Therefore they can only be: purple poop plants

  • Judy Johnson Wilson
    on Jul 21, 2013

    I checked your link Donna James and you are absolutely right. Eustoma exaltatum (L.) Salisb. ex G. Don, Catchfly prairie gentian, Bluebell gentian, Western blue gentian, Blue marsh lily, Small bluebell, Catchfly gentian, Seaside gentian Gentianaceae (Gentian Family It goes by many names. But this is certainly the same flower that is in question here.

  • Angie W
    on Jul 21, 2013

    After looking and comparing pictures, I think Donna James has it....Here are both pics... The ones Tami ask about and Donna's...I think we have a match...Look at the shape of the flower, and the inside colors and the height ...

  • Carolyn Davis
    on Jul 22, 2013

    To Betty Wilmott; the state flower of TX is the Bluebonnet.

  • April E
    on Jul 23, 2013

    @Carolyn Davis actually it is texas blue bell or lisianthus the botanical is Eustoma russellianum bluebonnet which is the texas state flower is Lupinus texensis and a very different flower

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