Kristy B
Kristy B
  • Hometalker
  • Louisville, KY
Asked on Jul 21, 2013

Any luck transplanting overgrown Lavender?

Lynne PurchaseKristy BThe Garden Frog with C Renee
+19

Answered

I have a lavender plant at a rental property that a tenant planted then moved. Of course it wasn't pruned or taken care of. It has grown huge and I need to move it. I've found online instructions on how to move it, I'm just wondering what kind of success I may get? Does anyone have advice, pointers or cautions?
The photo is about 5 years old. I'll post a current one when I can take a shot of it.
any luck transplanting overgrown lavender, gardening
22 answers
  • Sherrie
    on Jul 21, 2013

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  • Kristy B
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Sherrie, thanks for the advise. However, I think you posted a response on the wrong question. ;*) Not sure how this will help my Lavender recover from transplanting!

  • Su
    on Jul 21, 2013

    hahahaha yep senior moment I think....I would think you could just give it a really good hair cut....they do when they prune them to use the lavender....will be watching for answers as this is one of the reasons I have held back from planting any

  • Sia@South 47th
    on Jul 21, 2013

    Prune it hard, this keeps it healthy and coming back to produce! It's beautiful! OR Dig it up, wrap it and send it to ME LOL!!!

  • Catherine Smith
    on Jul 21, 2013

    You can certainly divide it with few problems. Do it in the fall, set up the bed with all the amendments to which you are going to move it in advance. Use a sharp, sterilized shovel and dig deep enough to get a decent root ball. You can then use the shovel or a sterile butcher knife to break it into smaller sections. Lavender is tough and can handle transplanting with little problem. Just plant and water deeply. You'll be good to go.

  • Gwen Mangelson
    on Jul 21, 2013

    22 yr master gardener here- never transplant anything in the summer months- wait till mid to later September to move it and prune it back before you cut it. I have grown many lavender plants in the last 30 years and never had any problem moving them. OR wait till early April to move it but be sure to prune it back then too and then dig and move- if you can take the soil around the roots with it do it, because that is what it is used to, do NOT fill the hole with potting soil for any plant always use the original soil to put back in the hole, have fun and keep it watered daily for the first few weeks but don't overwater and drown it either- ;o)

  • Patricia W
    on Jul 22, 2013

    Wait until is is dormant, like most transplanting, the plant needs to be asleep! Don't fertilize it until spring if you intend on doing so.

  • Nancy Martin Becker
    on Jul 23, 2013

    @@Gwen Mangelson uh oh. i just purchased a home in another county and had hoped to take starts from some of my perennials with me. my closing is in august so probably not the best time to uproot. i work in a garden center so lots of "stuff" follows me home.

  • Vanessa Godfrey
    on Jul 23, 2013

    Yes, prune it hard and then give it a week to heal some, dig it up giving yourself and it about 1 foot of root ball and dirt. Transplant give lots of water for a few weeks.

  • Gwen Mangelson
    on Jul 23, 2013

    @Nancy Martin Becker I totally understand ! I used to work at a nursery many years ago!! If you can keep them watered and not let them dry out- take them with you in plastic pots (clay drinks all the water first and evaporates before the plant gets any) I have some of my plants I brought from Washington state to Missouri by way of Idaho- lol a few didnt like it here and some are doing fine. good luck with your move!!!

  • Cynthia
    on Jul 23, 2013

    I move flowers, shrubs, anything whenever I want to. Just take care to keep them watered until they get settled good. I rarely lose anything.

  • Patricia Giuria
    on Jul 23, 2013

    Hi, you need first to cut it low maintaining the shape, then dig a huge hole with special earth from the Green House, natural compost with rice is the best one, or ask the seller, you will need someone to dig a huge place round the plant, taking care not to brake roots. Do it after sunset, put the plant in the new hole and put a lot of water, put rain boots and walk on the earth surrounding it, taking care there is no air between it, earth and roots, (if not, will die). watch it every day, for a week, and good luck.

  • WENDY
    on Jul 23, 2013

    mine get what my husband loves to call a huge buzz job every year..they keep coming back easy to grow and can be seperated and spaced easily.

  • Megan Smith
    on Jul 23, 2013

    Also lavender starts pretty easily from cuttings

  • Kathy Wall Polin
    on Jul 28, 2013

    just bought a new carrying case for my lap top... it smells too much of polastic... how do I get rid of that smell?

  • Megan Smith
    on Jul 28, 2013

    Maybe put lavender in it. Haha ha. I have no idea..maybe just time. I see we're neighbors. I love in fort bragg

  • Gwen Mangelson
    on Aug 6, 2013

    @Nancy Martin Becker When I worked at a nursery, I took things home daily too! lol Here in Missouri we dont have the quality or the selection of plants that are available in Oregon and Washington states. Have fun at your new home, I hope that you can take your plants with you!

  • Korenna Colquitt
    on Aug 6, 2013

    I can't wait until my lavender looks like that! I just planted 2 and they aren't very big. I do have a question, is there a way to discourage my black lab from "taking a leak" on my newly planted Black Eyed Susan? He leaves everything else alone but he insists on peeing on that poor little plant! I've sprayed him with water when I catch him and I make a habit of spraying the plant itself off everytime I water, but it's really starting to look sad. Who can blame the poor thing, I'd look sad too if someone kept peeing on me!

  • I think they success of moving any plant is having the confidence and the love toward nature. I move, transplant, and replant 10 months out of the year and I live in the South. One of my keys to success is I work with nature and try and move a plant/plants when it is going to rain. I try not cut (not always able) when I divide but to pull apart and water every day (if no rain) for 30 days. If you are moving and want to take your plants with try and dig them up after a good rain or water really well and dig up and put in pots/tubs, or any container. I have only lost a handful of plants in the many years of gardening and that was usually because I forgot where I put it `hence forgot to water. Good luck!

  • Korenna do you hose down the plant after he goes? Male dogs are so bad about peeing on things (that is why I have females). Plus I would make a barrier (or a really cool gardening feature) around the plant about a foot away or more if he is a big dog. breaking him will take some doing. Try moth balls too.

  • Kristy B
    on Aug 7, 2013

    I have a set of those foot-high wire fencing that you poke into the ground that I bought at Big Lots or another deep discount store that I put around the tender young plants in the yard. It works pretty well because at least they aren't hosing the new plants, they're just getting around it.

  • Lynne Purchase
    on Oct 2, 2014

    Hi Everyone, I'm from South Africa and I also have a male dog problem. I mix Tea Tree oil and water in a spray bottle and spray a little around the base of the bushes. He does not like it and tends to go somewhere else. it also does not damage the lavender plants

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