Darlene T
Darlene T
  • Hometalker
  • Delray, WV
Asked on Jul 24, 2013

Plant ID

Darlene TLynnDouglas Hunt
+17

Answered

I have two more plants that I need help with the ID...PLEASE. The first one "I" think is a Lilac, but my husband says no.In the 5+ years we have lived here it has never flowered, or even gotten abud... so, if it is a Lilac, does anyone have any suggestion on how to get itto bloom... I live in West Virginia.The other plant is a wild 'flower' that I have seen in the woods on myproperty, I think it is really cute, but before I transplant into my flowergarden... it would be nice to know what it is. Last year I made the mistake oftransplanting Snake weed (also known as Rattlesnake weed) and this year it hadall but taken over, so I started pulling them out, so you can see why I amleery about wild plants now :-)
Lilac????
Lilac????
my little wild flower... what is it???
my little wild flower... what is it???
20 answers
  • Spheramid Enterprises
    on Jul 24, 2013

    I think the little one may be winter green..squish a berry and smell it.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jul 24, 2013

    Welcome to Hometalk, Sonia, it's great to see another Central Floridian here. And thanks for sharing photos of your lovely garden.

  • Darlene T
    on Jul 24, 2013

    Douglas I think you meant to post to someone else.

  • Antique Unique
    on Jul 25, 2013

    the one on the left is a lilac, it needs at least 5 years to bloom, it looks pretty young.

  • Elaine
    on Jul 25, 2013

    Darlene, I think the comment above me is right - the one on the left is a lilac. I'm not positive, but I think they need cross pollination from another lilac..........

  • Mariposa
    on Jul 25, 2013

    My Lilac took 5 years to bloom after I planted it the leaves do look like Lilac on the first plant.

    plant id, flowers, gardening
  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jul 25, 2013

    Thanks for pointing that out, Darlene. There is a glitch in the system that we are trying to figure out.

  • Darlene T
    on Jul 25, 2013

    Thank you all... so Mariposa, since you have one that has bloomed, does it need the cross pollination? BTW, I LOVE your name 'Mariposa"... been meaning to tell you that :-)

  • Darlene T
    on Jul 25, 2013

    OH, BTW should the Lilac be pruned, and if so, When??? ALSO, I have a Rose bush that I was planning on cutting back this Fall, it is growing kind of wild looking. Will this hurt it and how much and when should I cut my Rose back??? Again THANK YOU EVERYONE... you are all so fantastic!!!

  • Lynn
    on Jul 25, 2013

    think the one on the right is an ixora mine are magnificent bloomers about 4 ft tall

  • Sabina
    on Jul 25, 2013

    Next year's lilac blooms will come from this year's stem growth. You should prune lilacs after they bloom and then leave them alone until the next bloom. They do not cross pollinate.

  • Faye
    on Jul 25, 2013

    Darlene, cut your roses back in the fall, you can cut down to 2ft, they will do fine and as far as the Lilac goes I trim mine early spring right befor they start pushing, that way where you trim will shoot new limbs.

  • Darlene T
    on Jul 25, 2013

    Spheramid Enterprises I think you are right about the small plant being Wintergreen... that and the Spotted Wintergreen are growing side by side, I think I will transplant both to my flower garden. Sabina and Faye, Thanks so much for the info... I am looking forward to seeing what my 'Circle' Garden will look like next year... I am "planning" on cutting all my flowers back and then mulching the whole garden. Where I live in WV there is A LOT of rocks, shale, slate and roots, so had difficulty planting... but it will be worth it... my "labor of love". THANK YOU TO EVERYONE for sharing your ideas, knowledge, pictures, etc. I really do love Hometalk, it and the people here are fantastic!!!

  • Jean DeSavage
    on Jul 26, 2013

    From what has been said about lilacs not blooming when they're young, will putting a mixture of epsom salts and sugar on it help it's growth?

  • Spheramid Enterprises
    on Jul 26, 2013

    I grew up in the N.E. and ate tons of them wintergreen or Teaberry as a kid.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jul 26, 2013

    Darlene, you would do better to significantly prune your roses in early spring, just before their flush of growth. Pruning stimulates growth, and you do not want to have a lot of tender young foliage as you go into winter.

  • Darlene T
    on Jul 26, 2013

    Thank you Douglas... I am glad you said something. Question though, what does "flush of growth" mean... I am guessing that is a gardening term??? Also, with the Lilacs and other flowers, when should they be pruned/cut back?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jul 27, 2013

    When they start to leaf out in the spring, Darlene. Shrubs that bloom in the spring generally bloom on old wood, so should be pruned just after they bloom. Shrubs that bloom in the summer generally bloom on new wood, so can usually be pruned first thing in the spring.

  • Lynn
    on Jul 27, 2013

    I'm still waiting for someone to identify the one on the right. Not sure my idea is right about it being ixora. I looked at my leaf and the tip is more pointed. ???

  • Darlene T
    on Jul 28, 2013

    Thanks Douglas... Again :-) Lynn, I would say that the small plant is definitely NOT ixora... I believe Spheramid Ent. is right about it being Wintergreen, I think it is the same plant that gets little red berries after the little white flowers... I'll keep an eye on them so I'll know for sure.

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