Sfg178760
Sfg178760
  • Hometalker
  • Sacramento, CA
Asked on Jul 27, 2013

WHAT IS THIS????

Sfg178760Larose LoganOakesEleanor P
+23

Answered

LOVE IT...And could not pass it up, but am not sure what it was used as at some point in history
It seems handmade, the wheel may be from an old baby carriage, and it is made of several kinds of metal. It still turns and loves so freakin' cool! Now please help me to tell what it is ...
for now it is just look hot in my living room! If it is "just" folk art I am okay with that...but really think someone made it to use for something! ;o)
How cool is this wheel thingy?  But what is it?
How cool is this wheel thingy? But what is it?
Made from an old baby carriage wheel...i think.  The "hub cap" has a logo on it even.
Made from an old baby carriage wheel...i think. The "hub cap" has a logo on it even.
Love these arm/cup thingies!
Love these arm/cup thingies!
The base is made of iron and wonderfully oddly very decorative!
The base is made of iron and wonderfully oddly very decorative!
25 answers
  • Linda Stone
    on Jul 27, 2013

    I don't suppose you can read the logo. ?

  • Lora Collins
    on Jul 27, 2013

    Have not idea but wonder if it could have been used to wind up something? (like yarn?) I'm waiting to see .....

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 27, 2013

    If I could see the logo...pretty sure that would be the logo of the pram it came off of and not this hand made contraption! o) Winding something like yarn sounds along the lines I was thinking! I am sending the photo to a friend who's father was an auctioneer for a long time in upstate NY (I am in New England)...hopefully he will be able to tell me more info!

  • Accentuations!
    on Jul 28, 2013

    I agree with the winding theory! those little wings were meant to hold someting in place, I'm sure. Maybe a little spinning wheel contraption? Certainly let us all know when you get the profession opinion!

  • Larissa ~ Prodigal Pieces
    on Jul 28, 2013

    I'm almost certain it was used to wind wire or cable. I've seen a similar one at an old hardware store still in use! ;o) The prongs keep the wire from coming off while measuring out the correct length.

  • Larose LoganOakes
    on Jul 28, 2013

    Hello! I noticed that the (wheel?) has 16 spokes and 16 clips. The base appears to be from and old stand-up lamp maybe.I think someone engineered this item to meet some particular need at the time. It is really interesting looking. I see why you couldn't just walk away from it. It just screams to be noticed. I think the wheel part was from an old bicycle but I am still working on locating a maker with the first initial H. That's what it looks like to me anyway.Let us know what you find out about it.:)

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 28, 2013

    The letters on the "hub" seem to be H M...but not sure about the second one. I think the wheel is either from a tricycle or a pram. Just heard back from the Auctioneer father of friend...he said is is a henway. Which I think is a joke for he does not know what it is? I googled henway and that is all I got! o) Some guy at the auction said it was to dry old fly fishing line as it was made from silk and needed to be dried in between use! ??? I looked up fly fish dryer and found other odd looking contraptions but not one like this one????

  • Larose LoganOakes
    on Jul 28, 2013

    What is the diameter of the wheel?Take a piece of paper and a pencil and hold the paper on top of the hub and rub the pencil back and forth over the paper and the initials should become clearer.

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    13"

  • Larose LoganOakes
    on Jul 29, 2013

    After doing much research I do believe that the wheel came from a Heywood and Morrill baby carriage or pram. They were made after 1921 in the USA, in MA. As far as what this gadget or machine was used for I have no idea other than what everyone else has suggested.It is quite interesting to say the least! Check out this link. I think you have a real piece of history there. Whatever you do I would not alter it at all. Enjoy! Check out pages 13 and 14 in particular! http://archive.org/details/completedcentury00heyw Apparently Amos Morrill was the son-in-law of Benjamin F. Heywood and when Amos died his wife Mary Morrill took over his duties. ( Hence the M of the H and M in the logo).

  • Brenda Cantrell
    on Jul 29, 2013

    DON'T KNOW WHAT IT IS, BUT WOULD LOVE TO OWN IT TO MAKE A MINIATURE WATERWHEEL FOR POND AREA....ADD LITTLE SWINGING BUCKETS AND WATER FLOW OVER INTO TOP BUCKET TO MAKE IT SPIN.....LOVE IT. WHERE CAN I GET ONE?

  • Alice L
    on Jul 29, 2013

    It looks like a rubber stamp wheel that would have been used in an office.

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Old My Gosh (Old is on purpose...I say that instead of Oh my gosh, whenever it has to pertain something something old ;o), Larose D. Logan-Oakes! You rock! I thought I had good research skills, but your tenacity rocks! The thing I have a whole house of mid century stuff in Florida and love Heywood Wakefield, although I only have a full bed frame that I found for a deal as I usually can not afford their mid century stuff! I am going to post this link on my fb page for all those other people who are interested in the history of the company way before the mid century! I am around an hour from Orvis Fly Fishing Company and Museum...I am going to contact them to see what they say. I, too, feel like I bit of history and although I bought it to sell, I have fallen deeply in Luff (Stuff + Love = Luff) with it!

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Alice L, I know what you are talking about, but can not find photos of similar ones. I only found this type: ??

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Woops...the copied photo did not come up, but here is a link to what I was talking about! https://www.etsy.com/listing/95267608/large-vintage-industrial-metal-stamp

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Brenda Cantrell... mind was going to be for sale, but I just may hold on it at least for awhile! o) And I think you have to make your own...pretty sure it one of a kind and hand made! o)

  • Tracey T
    on Jul 29, 2013

    @Larose D. Logan-Oakes That is some good info you shared! You really know your stuff!

  • J
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Re: Henway. Auctioneer friend: I think it's a henway. You: What's a henway? Auctioneer friend: About 3 pounds. ;) He's yankin' your chain.

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Denise...uh, yes I know! I had a feeling before I googled it...but you never know in the world of antiques and old stuff! AND it is also his way of saying, He does not know! He was my ace in the hole! o) Just called the American Museum of Fly Fishing...and I hope they can help me decide what it is!

  • Eleanor P
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Don't know what it is either. but will be waiting patiently to see if you find out. Sounds like fun.

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Okay, the Fly Fishing Museum knocked out the fly fish line dryer because it is made of metal...and metal rusts. But I am not sure about that because the cups where the line would touch is galvanized and they are not rusted! Ha, the rest of it is though! o) Do not think the person made it to last centuries or the such, so I am still betting on that one!

  • Larose LoganOakes
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Hey Dawn! I just tried to call you but I had to leave you a message instead. Look at page 15 of the link that I sent to you as I believe that this crude machine was used to spin the rattan into yarn from which mats, floor coverings and baling cloth were made. Call me.:)

  • Sfg178760
    on Jul 29, 2013

    Wow...so cool! After looking at the photos...it could have been used for unwinding wicker or yarn/rope into the machines at the factory where the wheel came from (the wheel was from a wicker baby pram which the company made)! So cool! Look at this primitive barn rope winder: http://factory20.com/oddities/old-primitive-amish-barn-rope-winder/ I am thinking it may have been used in the factory and I am in NE and the company was around here! So exciting! o)

  • Sfg178760
    on Aug 19, 2014

    UPDATE!!! I just brought this piece to the NYC Antiques Roadshow! Even though I told the Expert, James Supp, what Larose suggested above and which I believe it is as well...this piece stumped him. He first thought it was a yarn winder, but then took that back and said he was not sure what it was but it was made for something useful from bits and pieces so now it is folk art. Just wanted to let you know and that Larose gave me more info than some Antiques Roadshow expert. But In Mr. Supp's defense he was very excited about it and loved it! And no I will not be on the show...welll...maybe not. Look for a chubby woman in off-white shorts and shirt with her hair up int he background this fall when they air the NYC show! God knows...I tried to get on air and the camera peeps knew it! )

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