Jane P
Jane P
  • Hometalker
  • Fishers, IN
Asked on Jun 11, 2012

Ok, me again. Any idea what the heck this plant is? The berries almost look like jalepenos...

DenevaMarraJohnchip
+61

Answered

This is in my friend's yard in Indiana. Any help is greatly appreciated!!
ok me again any idea what the heck this plant is the berries almost look like, gardening
61 answers
  • Leanne L
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Looks like a weed I have that grows around my yard and I yank it out every year

  • Stacy H
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Looks like a Chile piquin bush.

  • Hunny D
    on Jun 12, 2012

    It looks like the Wild Cherry trees my neighbor has in their yard. The berries look a lot similar. Not totally certain though

  • Janice N
    on Jun 12, 2012

    pepper plant. might be ornamental

  • Luanne H
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Wild columbine, poisonous to pets.

  • Janice N
    on Jun 12, 2012

    most people from Texas would know their peppers. Listen to Stacy H.

  • Dawn C
    on Jun 12, 2012

    can anybody tell me the name of this weed that comes back every year in Chicago?

  • Cheryl E
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Deadly Nightshade - toxic cousin of tomato.

  • Susan S
    on Jun 12, 2012

    @Janice - but, Jane is from Indiana. It's Stacy who's from Tx. And, I'm soo sorry, but I got nuthin for ya, except it's pretty & interesting, whatever it is!!!

  • Frayed F
    on Jun 12, 2012

    it looks like it could be nightshade, especially if the flowers are purple.

  • Jeanne F
    on Jun 12, 2012

    almost looks like nightshade but the fruit is too big i think. Nightshade is related to the tomato family but is very poisonous to eat.

  • Karen R
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Habaneros

  • Donna P
    on Jun 12, 2012

    I've see this plant in Michigan too. It's a weed. The berries smell bad in my opinion. I always thought they were poisonous.

  • Remo D
    on Jun 12, 2012

    pimento......easy

  • Felicia B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    It's on the tip of my tongue.....Japanese tea berry...no that's not it. I'll think of it.

  • James M
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Very pretty. Like little rainbows! :)

  • Kathie S
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Were the flowers purple with a yellow center? If so, deadly nightshade.

  • Karie C
    on Jun 12, 2012

    If it gets little purple flowers with yellow centers then it is poisonous nightshade.

  • Tina M
    on Jun 12, 2012

    look like habinero's

  • Theresa B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Deadly nightshade. do not eat !

  • Jeanne F
    on Jun 12, 2012

    the more i look the more i believe it is evening nightshade which is very deadly.

  • Cynthia G
    on Jun 12, 2012

    It's some type of chile, I have one that popped up in my yard too. BTW, chiles and tomatoes are really giant nightshade berries. Try this at your own risk, but nightshade berries are edible as long as they are fully ripe (usually black), and taste exactly like tomatoes!

  • Cynthia G
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Dawn, that is a Lavatera, native to the Channel Islands in Calif. It is a member of the mallow family.

  • Sheila B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Could it be a plant they call a tobacco plant? I have them in my yard in Idaho, I pull them out every year all summer long.

  • Cathy R
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Dawn, Your plant is called Tall Mallow. Some people call it a wild hollyhock. It isn't a weed, however it does reseed quite easily.

  • Val E
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Looks like nightshade to me also, very poisonous. Google "nightshade fruit images", looks the same to me.

  • Deb J
    on Jun 12, 2012

    It looks like nightshade to me too. Does it get tiny purple flowers?

  • Jane P
    on Jun 12, 2012

    You guys are just fantastic! It does get purple flowers. thanks for all of the help!! My buddy has kids and dogs and I'm sure she doesn't want this thing in her yard!!

  • Kimberley B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    it looks allot like deadly nightshade, not sure of it's scientific name but it's highly poisonous to pets livestock and people

  • Alison G
    on Jun 12, 2012

    WOODY NIGHTSHADE - GET RID OF IT!

  • Potatoes and tomatoes are both in the nightshade family. This reminds me of some potatoes gone to fruit/seed

  • Patricia B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    pepper plant

  • Glenda B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    @Dawn C. - the purple flowered plant is Malva Brave Heart. I have a packet of seeds and grow them in a flower bed. They come back every year. Here in E. TN, they are called French Hollyhocks.

  • Walter Reeves
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Woody nightshade, Solanum dulcamara

  • Julie D
    on Jun 12, 2012

    @Dawn C. When I enlarged the photo of the little lavendar flowers, they look like a perennial geranium, as do the leaves. Does it grow like a ground cover?

  • Neil R
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Thid is one of the nightshades a relative of our domestic tomato but deadly poisonous!

  • Vivian S
    on Jun 12, 2012

    It looks like night shade to me. Very poisonous. Take a bit of it to your local nursery or extension service to have it properly identified. Keep it away from children. Nightshade has a purple flower with a yellow center. Go online to check the images of Deadly Nightshade. It grows around my house and I pull it pretty easily.

  • Anne B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    To bad the nightshade is deadly it is a pretty flower.

  • Christy P
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Listen to Vivian! use gloves

  • Vicky J
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Dawn, Glenda is right. Your plant is not a weed. I also grow them and it's called French Hollyhock. I personally love them.

  • Linda B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    That is not nightshade, it is not poisonous! It is called Mallow, a part of the Hollyhock family. You don't need to wear gloves...give it up ladies! Mallow - look it up if you are in question...

  • Janet C
    on Jun 12, 2012

    I would call the county extension agent to identify.........they have a wealth of information on many things....

  • Sharon
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Yes, Linda you are correct!! It is not a weed but a beautiful spring, early summer flower. I have them in my flower garden on purpose and get many compliments.

  • Rosemarie B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    MALLOW!!! This is also known as French Hollyhock and I would love to have it growing in my garden. Definitely not Nightshade. You can google it for further info.

  • Kristi K
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Dawn, I have an entire flowered of this. It started with 3 little one inch planters and the flower bed is now full (4 years later). I absolutely love it! It's completely maintenance free and will grow up to 4 feet tall. It's called Zebra Mallow and it will continue to reseed each year.

  • Kathy H
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Dawn, your flower is called Hollyhock Mallow. I just bought some this year,I went to look at it and grabbed the ID stick. height 36" space 15" light Full sun reseeds it's self. You have a very pretty free plant. I would not post this if I hadn't checked mine first to be sure. enjoy

  • Pat
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Wow! That is just like the tree/bush in my yard. I have 3 and they are lovely. One has purple flowers, one white, and one pink. They grow in full sun and right now have gotten to about 15 feet tall. Guess I'll get a pic over to the extension office.

  • Janice N
    on Jun 12, 2012

    wish people wouldn't butt into another person's post. this is all confused now. Dawn C. post on your own. Jane P, do you know what your plant is yet?

  • Jane S
    on Jun 12, 2012

    This is Belladonna also called Night Shade. Every part of the plant is poisonous. It is a pretty vine but you need to kill it to keep people and especially children (who might eat the berries) from hospitalization or death. All I've read says death comes quick after ingestion of any part of plant.

  • CONNIE W
    on Jun 12, 2012

    Night Shade - Get rid of it . . very poisonous. I didn't know if my dogs would bother it, but I did not take any chances.

  • Eileen S
    on Jun 12, 2012

    I've seen this plant in Jersey - I would destroy it. They called it deadly night-shade. I spreds quickly and is invasive to any garden.

  • Becky B
    on Jun 12, 2012

    use gloves-I'm allergic to it and it makes me break out and itch-I call it the creeping krud

  • Cynthia G
    on Jun 13, 2012

    C'mon folks, chiles, potatoes, and tomatoes are ALL nightshades (Solanum). The berries are edible on even deadly nightshade as long as they are FULLY ripe. I have eaten them myself many times, and have had family and friends eat them also. This is a chile of some type

  • Alison G
    on Jun 13, 2012

    With all of these replies about it possibly being a member of the nightshade family, I'd take a sample to your local extension - or a good landscaper and ask - dont take chances!

  • Linda R
    on Sep 3, 2014

    Woody Nightshade, this is not mallow, from someone who has 40 years of gardening under her belt.

  • Johnchip
    on Apr 19, 2016

    "Mother Nature's Bird Food". If it were meant for you to eat , it would already be frozen, packaged and sold by the Jolly Green Giant!

  • Marra
    on Jun 18, 2016

    It's woody nightshade. You can eat it, some people make preserve's but - it's bitter, tastes yucky and is best left to the critters.

    • Marra
      on Jun 24, 2016

      The plant is mostly used in folk medicine and in some commercial drugs today. It can be poisonous to children so it's best treated as a poison. Medicinal Action and Uses---The drug possesses feeble narcotic properties, with the power of increasing the secretions, particularly those of the skin and kidneys. It has no action on the pupil of the eye. It is chiefly used as an alterative in skin diseases, being a popular remedy for obstinate skin eruptions, scrofula and ulcers. It has also been recommended in chronic bronchial catarrh, asthma and whoopingcough. For chronic rheumatism and for jaundice it has been much employed in the past, an infusion of 1 OZ. of the dried herb to 1/2 pint water being taken in wineglassful doses, two or three times daily. From the fluid extract made from the twigs, a decoction is prepared of 10 drachms in 2 pints of boiling water, boiled down to 1 pint, and taken in doses of 1/2 to 2 OZ. with an equal quantity of milk. The berries have proved poisonous to a certain degree to children. Fluid extract, 1/2 to 2 drachms.

  • Deneva
    on Aug 9, 2016

    It looks like my BARBADOS CHERRY TREE. Does you fruit begin with pretty bluish, violet or pink little flowers? If it does, then that is the Tree. It's supposed to have a tremendous amount of Vitamin C. I don't always wait until they're red, sometimes I eat them when they're almost red.

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