Susan J
Susan J
  • Hometalker
  • Chicago, IL
Asked on Jul 31, 2013

Want to make this clock frame, anyone have ideas on how to make it?

SandraCherryl Rushing-McLaughlinKaron Nelson Roberts
+11

Answered

I have the shells already
q want to make this clock frame anyone have ideas on how to make it, crafts
12 answers
  • Drought Smart Plants
    on Jul 31, 2013

    It looks like hypertufa, which would be totally doable. You might want to have a look on the Facebook group that I'm on for some ideas (Warning: make sure you have a lot of time before going there - it's completely addictive) https://www.facebook.com/groups/89367815733/

  • Zee
    on Jul 31, 2013

    Check out my blog at www.zazzyzee.blogspot.com I posted recently how to make stepping stones which would be the same technique as this clock. Hyperfufa would work too, but is a bit more involved than my technique.

  • Wendy M
    on Aug 2, 2013

    I made something similar to this for my bathroom. I took a thick piece of cardboard and cut out the circle. Purchased sand from my local craft store and glued it on the cardboard. After it was dry I glued on shells. Using cardboard made it lighter for hanging up on the wall.

    • Judy
      on Nov 17, 2014

      @Wendy M That's almost exactly what I was about to suggest. The only difference is that I was thinking thin plywood instead of cardboard.

  • Sparkles
    on Aug 2, 2013

    plywood backing along with others suggestions

  • Drought Smart Plants
    on Aug 2, 2013

    How about using a plate from the thrift store?

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Aug 2, 2013

    If this was made from "grout" it would be fairly heavy and awkward to hang. Perhaps a lightweight florist foam "core" that is layered with spray adhesive and beach sand.

  • Diane Frank
    on Aug 2, 2013

    Just remember to leave access for battery replacement access in the back...otherwise...a short term clock!

  • Laura Vierling Holcomb
    on Aug 2, 2013

    Measure diameter of clock. Cut plywood about 4-5 inches larger in diameter, or recycle a table top. Glue your shells down with silicone as @Karen @ The Decorated Nest suggested. I would think the hypertufa suggested by @Drought Smart Plants would be lighter weight than the sanded grout, but i am not sure if it would apply as easily as the grout.

  • Karon Nelson Roberts
    on Aug 3, 2013

    I would get the lightest, thinnest plywood, cut a circle, apply plaster of paris-can get colored or add dry dye to get color--, place shells. and let dry. Be sure to cut a small hole so you can change battery and set time. Good Luck

  • Cherryl Rushing-McLaughlin
    on Nov 17, 2014

    Use a pizza pan , its shallow . Or a pan so that the cement can form around the clock edges....press in the shells when mortor is starting to set....let it cure. Oh, and I would spray the pan with cooking oil spray so it doesnt stick when you turn it over. Place a towel underneath to avoid breaking

  • Sandra
    on Sep 17, 2015

    You might be able to use paper mâché. The shells could be stuck into it because you would use glue to hold everything together. Probably a plastic bowl with a bottom about the size of the face of the clock would work. A shallow bowl. The clock face would face the outside of,the bottom of the bowl making the lip of the bowl hit the wall. Anything with some sort of flare. You may have to cut the bowl to make the depth fit the depth you want. Then you can have enough for you battery pack behind the face. The paper mâché would go on the bowl. It would be much lighter than cement. However I am not sure it would adhere properly. It's worth a try. And cheap. Elders glure and strips of paper, adding the shells. BTW, if you use plaste of Paris the coat should not be too thick. Just wanted to add that because it could crack.

  • Sandra
    on Sep 17, 2015

    Oh, just thought of using a pie tin. Cut out the bottom for your clock.

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