Pam Southard Stano
Pam Southard Stano
  • Hometalker
  • Romulus, MI
Asked on Aug 2, 2013

Brown spots on leaves of my rose bushes.

Catherine SmithPam Southard StanoGloria S
+4

Answered

I have two rose bushes their aren't many leaves left on them and what is left has brown spots on them ?
6 answers
  • Kimberly Barney
    on Aug 2, 2013

    You need to remove the affected leaves and any that are around the base of the bush. The leaves do not need to be added to compost pile. The leaves need to be tossed in the trash. Then treat the rose bushes with a mixture of water and milk. I am still battling this issue with my rose bushes but they are looking much better.

  • Don Gale
    on Aug 2, 2013

    What you have is black spot fungus! Kimberly is correct to remove all leaves & stems then discard.Next spray a garden fungicide on what's left of your rose bush (or vines). Repeat spray as instructed (every 2 weeks usually) untiyou see newgrowth

  • Gloria S
    on Aug 3, 2013

    Best thing I have found for my rose bushes is right in my kitchen...my used coffee grounds!! When I make a pot of coffee, I put the used grounds in a folgers coffee container[rinse off the filter & put it in my other container for the compost]. Each time I add coffee grounds, I add a cup or two of water & when it's full I go out & pour it on top of the soil around my rose brush. Also I spray them with neem oil about every 2 wks, & once every 2 months feed them with rose food. Good luck!!

    • Julianna
      on May 11, 2014

      Hi Gloria, I'd like to use your coffee idea but I don't quit understand what you are doing. R you just using the water from the container or are you pouring grounds and water on the rose bush?

  • Catherine Smith
    on Aug 4, 2013

    I hate Black Spot and I live in the Black Spot capitol here in VA. In order to get it under control, you need to clean the area under the rose bushes throughly, and discard the debris. Black spot is an air borne fungus, that gets on the leaves, when they drop off they contaminate your bed with fungus spores. When it rains, the spoors get splashed back up on the leaves, so you have a vicious cycle. I use corn meal, since corn gluten is a natural fungi suppressant. I found the suggestion on an organic gardening site and decided to try it. Works like a charm, haven't had a problem with Black spot on any of my roses in the last 3 years. I go out early in the morning when there is still dew on the plants and turn both the plants and the bed yellow. Do ti about twice a week during bloom season. I am tickled, as I have about 50 different rose bushes, you know how that is, one rose bush is never enough. LOL Since I am an organic gardener I won't use commercially made chemical fungicides, since I am very touchie/feelie with my roses and really don't want a visit from the cancer fairy. Coffee grounds is not a fungi suppressant, but worms love it and they increase the fertility of the soil. Neem is one of the "heavy hitters" of the organic insecticides, Gloria. Unless you have a serious problem with aphids or other pests. you don't need to use it so often. Healthy rose bushes can withstand a lot of both insect and disease problems, if you make sure your soil is rich in organic materials, so the worms and microbial life can help the plants get all the nutrients they may need.

  • Pam Southard Stano
    on Aug 5, 2013

    thank you very much I will give it a try (even though Im allergic to corn meal) so I just dust the corn meal on all of them ? (its on four of my five rose bushes) I cleaned the area all out this weekend.

  • Catherine Smith
    on Aug 6, 2013

    @Pam Southard Stano , yes you should do them all and the bed area. If you are allergic, you might want to get someone else to do this for you. Or dress accordingly, long sleeves, wear gloves and use a mask. I have to do that if handling alfalfa, so I can relate. I've found by doing this regularly, especially in the early spring when the roses are just starting to really get going, helps to reduce the black spot tremendously. You can't kill it, but you can suppress it to the point where I think it can not easily reproduce itself. That's an educated guess. But it's nice not to have to deal with the stuff. LOL

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