Lisa C
Lisa C
  • Hometalker
  • Cumming, GA
Asked on Jun 17, 2012

Can anyone help to identify? Saw these this evening entwined amongst the pines adjacent a nearby conservation area.

Ljr10627467JanKathy Raper
+38

Answered

Are they wild? Would I want them in my wooded yard with my pines for color or are they invasive?
Flower closeup
Flower closeup
Leaf closeup
Leaf closeup
32 answers
  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Jun 17, 2012

    Red Trumpet Creeper (Campsis radicans). Great vine for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds, but they are considered an invasive noxious weed by some folks.

  • Valse53
    on Jun 17, 2012

    I agree that it is a red trumpet creeper. Loves sun and dies back in our cold winters (NM)

  • Rose U
    on Jun 18, 2012

    Trumpeet vine is considered invasive here in MI, I had planted one then foundout and went through some work to remove it. It is supposed to be a great butterfly and humming bird nector source.

  • CONNIE W
    on Jun 18, 2012

    Red Trumpet Vine - Yes it can be invasive. Dies back in my winter weather. Love the way it looks when it blooms. I have had Hummingbirds nest in mine.

  • Carol C
    on Jun 18, 2012

    Trumpet Vine is very invasive, comes up all over the yard, but as long as you keep the yard mowed it won't be a problem. It grows about 20' per season. It's a beautiful vine and looks great on a trellis or pergola.

  • Violeta vlaming
    on Dec 31, 2014

    Добави в този пост ...Called TEKOM radikans, Kampsis, Bignoniya. Admire its bright, abundant flowering, solar her hospitable broadcast, summer beauty, which generously donated.TEKOM is a genus of 14 species of shrubs or small trees of the family Bignoniaceae. Twelve species of North and South America, and the other two species are African. From the southern United States in Central America and Antilles plants reach the south in the Andes in South America to northern Argentina. Bignoniaceae family includes about 650-750 species of mostly tropical trees, shrubs, vines and rare herbaceous plants distributed in 116-120 genera. Bushes for the most part also katerlivo plants in need of support, with large, showy flowers. Bignonia family and family is so named in 1694 by Joseph Pitton de Turnefort (Joseph Pitton de Tournefort) (1656-1708), French botanist who made ​​the first clear distinction between genus and species, described 8000 plants and separate them into 22 groups. It gives it a large family name of Jean-Paul Bignon (1662-1743), clergyman, minister of Louis XIV, abbot of the monastery at San Quentin, a member of the French Academy of Sciences, chief librarian of the French National Library, the largest at that time in Europe. These vines are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, several - in temperate regions, but the most diverse in South America.Main clans: Tabebuia, Arrabidaea, Adenocalymma Jacaranda. Plants are very decorative, many of them are cultivated, some of Catalpaand Tabebuia species are used for timber. In our most (Bulgaria ) frequently occurs Campsis radicans (synonym - Tecoma radicans). This is katerlivo, deciduous shrubs - liana whose stems can reach up to 20 m in length. Liana is very beautiful and impressive with its lush greenery and large whirling colors, with its long, heavy and bright blooms. Used for vertical landscaping walls, fences, gazebos, ideal for curly special props (a pyramid, a ball) in grassy areas. By adventitious roots are attached to the support and can climb to a height of 10 meters. With clipping can be formed in an upright, shtambovo tree. The leaves are opposite, without prilistnitsi tekoperesti composed of 9-11 large serrated leaves with a length of 6 cm and hairy on the underside on the median nerve. TEKOM colors are beautiful, funnel and pipe-orange, collected 4-12 in outer petals. Color itself has a length of 5-7 cm and 3-4 cm width. Sepals and petals are 5-lobed. Corolla sometimes dvuusto. The number of stamens mostly 4 is associated with the corolla. Blossoms in August to late September, October, for about 7-8 weeks. The fruit is an interesting cylindrical box, 8-10 cm long. TEKOM growing rapidly, especially in rich and moderately moist soils. It is svetlolyubivo, thermophilic, frost - withstand transient drop in temperature to -15 ° C. Propagated by seeds, cuttings and rooted waveguides. When dry seeds are preserved well for 2-3 years. They need stratification at 5-10 ° C for 2 months. Germinated better at higher temperatures. Sown to a depth of 1.5 cm. When propagation by seeds, plants grow more slowly. Weak flowering they started only 7-8-year. If using rooted cuttings of old, eat flowering plant young TEKOM begins to bloom even 2-3-year. It should be borne in mind that the colors of the vine are formed on the branches of the current year, grown on multi stems to be formed correctly. So at the beginning of vegetation on rooted plant leave 2-4 strongest branches and other break off. It is very important at the end of the vegetation they reach 2.5-3 meters and stiff fine. These branches form the skeleton of the plant and must be maintained. Best first summer TEKOM be grown in a pot (container), and in the winter to keep the cold basement. If a summer young plant fails to form branches, it can be left in the container for another season, and in the spring to plant a permanent place. In the coming years, even if some portion of the annual branches freeze, this is no longer scary. Anyway, every year the vine is pruned heavily, leaving only an initial formed skeletal branches. You should consider how to protect the roots of TEKOM winter in areas with lower temperatures. TEKOM has a number of decorative shapes: the magnificent (f. Speciosa), which usually grows as a shrub with long, thin twigs and small oval leaves with orange-red flowers up to 3 cm; gold (f. flava) - with unusual yellow flowers; Early (f. rraesoh), which blooms with large flowers a month earlier than usual; dark red (f. atropurpurea) - with huge purple flowers; "Madame Galen" (Campsis x tagliabuana) with big colors in decoration bouquets. Campsis "speciosa" Campsis "Flava" Campsis "Grandiflora" Campsis "Madame Galen"

  • Debra Anderson
    on Jan 1, 2015

    Red Trumpet Creeper vine. They are invasive if you let them get away on you. If your pines are in a well wooded place I'd let them go. They're a pretty plant & adds color to your surroundings. And it's a great attractant for butterflies and hummingbirds. I wouldn't mind having them on my fence line. Where I don't want them I'd spray with apple cider vinegar---an all natural plant/weed killer.

  • Beverly
    on Jan 3, 2015

    Does this plant grow in zone 9? North Florida

  • Beatrice Tangeman
    on Jul 24, 2015

    Ditto to Debra..

  • Gina R Macialek
    on Jun 23, 2016

    Angel trumpets are deadly if a child ingest them. They paralyze the central nervous system. Be very careful.

  • Cass Watson
    on Jun 23, 2016

    These are not angel trumpet though.. I have had both orange trumpet vines in my back yard and angel trumpet in garden. Angel trumpet is much larger.

  • Trumpet Vine. If you can't keep them under control they will take over.....everything. Hummingbirds love them. If they are away from the house in an area you don't mind, let them go. One house here let their's climb the phone poll, gorgeous when in bloom!

  • Barbara Morris
    on Jul 13, 2016

    Looks humming bird vine , they are invasive .

  • Ellen Walker
    on Jul 15, 2016

    Looks like Mandavilla vine

  • Michelle Eliker
    on Jul 15, 2016

    Like a lot of people have already said, it's a Trumpet Vine, Campsis radicans. My neighbor's grew over his fence and onto my house, and it ripped off my gutters when I didn't get it removed in time. :(

  • Sandra M. Willis
    on Jul 16, 2016

    They are Virginia Creeper. Be careful what you wish for. They are very invasive. I believe Trumpet Vine is another name for the same plant. I live in Georgia and it's everywhere.

  • Mst8580301
    on Jul 16, 2016

    Trumpet vine...you must keep them trimmed because they will take over. They certainly are gorgeous and have continuous flowers...humming birds love them

  • Rosemary
    on Jul 17, 2016

    We have this trumpet vine and they do get big...and sends seeds out too. Then they pop up everywhere. Ours is away from the house (you DON'T want this near your house) around a thick pole and another around an old outdoor swing support. It comes in yellow too...

  • Sandra M. Willis
    on Jul 17, 2016

    Virginia Creeper and Trumpet vine are names for the same plant. It depends on where you live.

  • Loi5254447
    on Sep 1, 2016

    Beautiful! Used to "pop" the blossoms at my grandma's house. What a brat! Don't let it grow on your house - can be destuctive! But trellis is good!

  • Sally Adams-Hosiner
    on Sep 2, 2016

    We had a trumpet vine grow to the top of house and up the chimney. Had to chop it out and pour stuff on it to kill it out.

  • Cynthia Marshall
    on Sep 2, 2016

    Virginia creeper is different than trumpet vine

  • The10415748
    on Sep 3, 2016

    I think that is a Trumpet Vine.

  • Sue Kiene
    on Oct 3, 2016

    You can move it and give it support to make a tree out of it rather than just a vine. Very pretty

  • Trumpet Vine. Humming Birds love them!

  • Linda T
    on Nov 12, 2016

    Trumpet vine. Def' invasive, yet I have tried for 30 years to grow them and though I have foliage, there are no flowers! I wouldn't care if they spread, since I despise neat and tidy gardens, I just want what ever the humming birds and others, bees and butterflies want.

    • Sue Kiene
      on Nov 15, 2016

      Actually fertilizing them is a problem. You should not. Lesser soils are also better for it. And yes it could be the amount of sun it is getting because they like 8+ hours of sun a day. Good luck.

  • Sally Adams-Hosiner
    on Nov 13, 2016

    Trumpet vine. We had one as tall as our chimney . Had to kill it out as it takes over. Will work on a fence row .

  • Linda T
    on Nov 15, 2016

    Thanks.

  • Deb11857559
    on Dec 15, 2016

    Lisa C THIS PLANT IS CALLED HUMMINGBIRD VINE (CAMPSIS RADICANS). IT IS A PERENNIAL. WHEN YOU BUY THEM FROM A NURSERY, THEY COME FAIRLY SMALL IN SIZE. BUT PLANTED IN THE RIGHT CONDITIONS, AND LIGHTING WILL GROW 6 FT IN THE 1ST YR.- 15-35 FT IN THE 3RD YR. AND CAN SPREAD 6 FT IN THE 1ST YEAR AND 6-15 FT IN THE 2ND YEAR.
    AS FAR AS WHERE THEY CAN GROW, THEY CAN BECOME QUITE INVASIVE IF THEY ARE NOT TAKEN CARE OF PROPERLY. DON'T LET THEM CLIMB AGAINST YOUR HOUSE BECAUSE THEY WILL ATTACH THEMSELVES TO YOUR BRICKS OR SIDING AND CAUSE BIG PROBLEMS LATER! GIVING THEM SOMETHING LIKE A TRELLIS OR FENCE TO CLIMB ON WILL HELP THEM STAY FORMED AND NOT DAMAGE ANYTHING. IF YOU OCCASIONALLY TRIM/PINCH BACK VINES, YOU WILL ENSURE THICKER AND DENSE GROWTH. THEY ALSO LOOK NICE GROWING UP AGAINST A PERGOLA AND ON POSTS. THEY CAN BE PLANTED IN ANY TYPE OF SOIL FROM RICH TO CLAY! THEY WILL BLOOM FROM JULY THROUGH WELL INTO AUGUST IN MANY AREAS.
    THEY LIKE TO HAVE DAMP SOIL BUT NOT TOO WET. FERTILIZE WITH A HIGH BLOOM FERTILIZER TWICE A MONTH. THEY DO PREFER FULL SUN AS FAR AS WHERE YOU PUT THEM. ONCE YOUR VINES TAKE OFF, YOU'LL BE SURPRISED TO SEE HOW MANY HUMMINBIRDS START SHOWING UP TO YOUR HOME! THEY LOVE THESE FLOWERS! YOU'LL HAVE A CURTAIN OF RED AND ORANGE BLOOMS FOR THESE BEAUTIFUL BIRDS!
  • Kathy Raper
    on Dec 17, 2016

    Be very careful to be sure that it actually is a trumpet vine.Here in Mississippi there is a vine very similar to that.It grows wild and is poisonous.It will cause a horrible rash.My mother called it a cow itch vine.She fell into a patch of it and it took months for the rash to heal.It was hard to find medication to help.
  • Jan
    on Dec 24, 2016

    Trumpet vine is lovely, but eats the house. And fences. Gives ivy a good run for its money for invasiveness. I bought a house with it, they'd trimmed the vine that had attached itself to the wall, but the roots, even after 14 years, will pull the stucco off the walls if I detach them. It will have to happen someday, but not until I get rid of that plant. It has spread underneath the concrete driveway, & pops up thru cracks. I find new sprouts coming up 20 feet away. And this one isn't making seeds. They've taken Roundup off the market in Europe, & I hate to use it, but if any plant deserved it, its this one! And ligustrum....don't get me started there!
    LOL
  • Ljr10627467
    on Dec 28, 2016

    I am growing mine in a pot, hoping to keep it under control,. And pruning, for shape and control. I have a nice metal support as well. I took trimmings from a huge plant about 40 feet long and rooted them last summer. Made more work for myself, as I know they will grow crazy next summer, but they are a coral color and I had a yellow. Wondering if the hummingbirds will land on the yellow as well.
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