Elizabeth Bowen-droneburg
Elizabeth Bowen-droneburg
  • Hometalker
  • Woodsboro, MD
Asked on Aug 9, 2013

Too much rain is making my tomatoes get yellow leaves.

Lyn ThereseJud1016678Connie
+5

Answered

They are in a container with 2 pepper plants. All 6 plants are heavy with fruit. There is nothing I can do about the weather, but I am worried about the tomatoes. If it ever gets hot and sunny again, will they be alright? I do plan on feeding them again once they actually need water.
7 answers
  • Monica Poindexter
    on Aug 9, 2013

    Go to the dollar store and buy some cheap sponges. Press them onto the sides of the container to soak up the excess rainwater. You can then squeeze out the water for plants that may need water.

  • Elizabeth Bowen-droneburg
    on Aug 9, 2013

    Thank you for the suggestions but this doesn't answer my question because the container is wood, 3 feet deep and 6 feet long. Putting sponges on the sides would accomplish nothing.

  • Connie
    on Aug 9, 2013

    Is there any way to cover them for future rains? Perhaps plastic bags or umbrella if the wind is not crazy? I know I have thrown plastic sheeting over my gardens before or during many days of rain to protect what I could. Is there a way to add drainage to the pots? Perhaps drilling holes in the sides (if plastic) quite low to drain what is soaking the roots? Monica I like your idea of the sponges. I will remember that for future reference.

    • Elizabeth Bowen-droneburg
      on Aug 9, 2013

      @Connie The container drains out of the bottom. My husband built it and put holes in for me. I have thought about covering it, but even if I do, will the plants be okay after the rain is over? Even though they have yellow leaves on the bottoms of the plants?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Aug 10, 2013

    The plants should recover if they dry out. You might try an iron foliar spray as an added insurance policy.

  • Connie
    on Aug 10, 2013

    The yellow leaves means too much water...if it is sunny and ry out leave them alone so they can dry naturally or use the sponge method as suggested to take out as much residual water, I would only cover them at this point if it is raining still to prevent more water saturation. Other than that like Doug says they should weather well. I do not know this iron foliar spray he mentions as I am no sprays unless it is vinegar or soap for bugs. I will have to look that up for reference. Another thought is to have them get some wind if there is some as that will dry out water saturation at least on the plants themselves and the top of the soil. Tomatoes are quite vigorous as long as we do not get the dreaded blight again but no signs in my corner of the world yet. Good luck let us know how it goes.

  • Jud1016678
    on Jun 8, 2015

    Need drainage holes! They are sitting in too much water!

  • Lyn Therese
    on Aug 24, 2015

    Next year try putting coffee filters over the stones so that dirt does not clog the drainage holes. I have used Styrofoam plates cut to size and laid the plate over the holes. It prevents soil from clogging the drainage holes. When dealing with wood, people tend to drill small holes and then the water saturates the wood and the wood then swells and the holes are even smaller. Try bigger holes and some type of filter over the holes....good luck.

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