Jim G
Jim G
  • Hometalker
  • Suffolk, VA
Asked on Aug 11, 2013

USING EGG SHELLS: Salmonella Poisoning?? THIS IS IMPORTANT!

Aleta Kasper-HalterKMS WoodworksCatherine Smith
+8

Answered

to KILL any chance for salmonella poisoning, I've read to MICROWAVE egg shells (MY GOSH - MAKES HOUSE SMELL HORRIBLE for days!!), ALSO read BOIL to kill the salmonella, BUT I understand BOILING actually pulls ALL the nutrients from veggies and in this case the egg shells (Calcium), so is THAT a WASTE??? *** CAN THROWING IN CRUSHED EGG SHELLS into soil OR COMPOST LEAD TO SALMONELLA POISONING???
5 answers
  • Douglas Hunt
    on Aug 11, 2013

    According to the folks at Michigan State University Extension, you need not be concerned, Jim: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/adding_eggshells_to_compost

    • Jim G
      on Aug 11, 2013

      @Douglas Hunt Good article, and I do see where they reference "140-160 degrees F", so assumption is the compost gets to that temp at some point? interesting read.

  • Darlene
    on Aug 11, 2013

    I have been using crushed egg shells for MANY years and has never been any problem. I let them dry and then crush them and put in my compost pile.

  • Catherine Smith
    on Aug 11, 2013

    Salmonella doesn't come from the shell, JIm. This is unfortunately, a fairly common misunderstanding. It comes from the chicken feces and the eggs have not been property washed off. If you have doubts about your eggs simply re-wash using vinegar and water (10-1) allow to dry and store in a clean carton. This seems to be more of a problem with commercially produced "cold storage" eggs. We normally buy are eggs from a local organic farmer, who raises free-ranging chickens. Which seem to be less susceptible to a lot of pathogens normally present. The theory is the more balanced diet helps prevent the build up of those type of diseases. Salmonella is normally present in feces from many species including man. It's usually not a problem when proper sanitary techniques are in use.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Aug 11, 2013

    You're not "eating" your compost are you? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmonella the incidental amount found on shells would have a pretty hard time getting transferred to the produce that is consumed in a garden.

  • Aleta Kasper-Halter
    on Jul 26, 2014

    Lettuce, bell peppers and tomatoes give a good return on your investment. I have been using crushed egg shells when I make coffee. It is supposed to make the coffee less acidic. Then I put the coffee grounds and shells into my compost. I read that you are supposed to bake the shells at 350 f. for 10 minutes to kill salmonella. But it's too hot to use my oven. Looking for alternatives, I found this page.

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