Kelly W
Kelly W
  • Hometalker
  • Bay Shore, NY
Asked on Aug 12, 2013

Unknown Flower

JanBWandaSilvan Johnson
+11

Answered

So I seen this flower here and there along the railroad tracks in nothing but weeds, very vibrant color, so I pulled over, crazy I know but I carry a small shovel for this exact situation, and I dug some up to bring home. It has like a tuberous root or a rhizome that is horizontally seated of to the side of the actual plant, so when you pull it up it's like an L. Can anyone identify. I'm gonna call it rail road till I find out what it is, lol. Thanks guys.
unknown flower, flowers, gardening
13 answers
  • Barb Rosen
    on Aug 12, 2013

    Your pretty plant is the native perennial asclepia tuberosa or Butterfly Weed, Kelly! Here's a little bit about it http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ASTU

  • Kelly W
    on Aug 12, 2013

    No way, I thought that, so since I dug it up from it's natural habitat u think it will make it. The spot I took it from was full sun, on the side of the rail road, so it was dry, the only difference is it will get water here. Also do you know if it is aggressive.

    • Barb Rosen
      on Aug 12, 2013

      @Kelly W ~ Give it sun and it needs water to get established ,then is pretty drought tolerant. Not aggressive but will spread a little each year. A favorite of butterflies, hence its name : )

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Aug 12, 2013

    My asclepias self-sows with abandon, but I like the way it just tucks itself between other things, and they're very easy to pull up where you don't want them. Definitely worth it for the butterflies.

  • Donna Hathaway
    on Aug 13, 2013

    @ Kelly W. Butterfly Weed, I have some in my garden. I don't see many butterflies around it but lots of honey bee's

  • Lori
    on Aug 13, 2013

    Yup this is Butterfly Weed. It is a member of the Milkweed family, and spreads freely by seed. The butterflies love it! I have it by my inground pool in an area where the soil tends to be dry. It does very well, easy to care for. I love the orange flowers!

  • LOLA ADAMS
    on Aug 13, 2013

    Help answer this question...back home in West Virginia we call it butterfly weed it is very prolific I had a butterfly garden and transplanted many to my garden.. if you like butterflies this plants name is well deserved after transplanting several to my own garden the butterfly population more then doubled

  • Katherine W
    on Aug 13, 2013

    It is butterfly weed.

  • Peg
    on Aug 13, 2013

    You new butterfly weed will be a nice addition to your garden. Very sturdy plants, tolerates dry conditions. There's a darker red variety too. Mix it in with assorted Bee's Balm for color variety. You'll get plenty of butterflies and bees!

  • Plant asclepias and the bees and butterflies will come. Grows in the ditches around here in select areas.

  • Beth
    on Aug 13, 2013

    agreed, asclepias.

  • Silvan Johnson
    on Aug 13, 2013

    Yep, Butterfly Weed, I have some in my garden that I though died last year, but came back beautifully this year! And the butterflys do like them :)

  • Wanda
    on Aug 14, 2013

    Yes, this is a butterfly weed. Especially favorite of the monarch whose population is on a decline due to lack of food sources and a number of other disasters.

  • JanB
    on Aug 14, 2013

    Please see this article! http://www.monarchwatch.org/

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