David Waldman
David Waldman
  • Hometalker
  • Revere, MA
Asked on Aug 18, 2013

What kind of grapes are these?

MaryannJanet FEmma Santoro-Adkison
+18

Answered

Will they make good wine?
what kind of grapes are these, gardening
17 answers
  • Nancy Hand
    on Aug 18, 2013

    Bunch grapes Concord are "grape" color ones. Yes they make great wine!

  • Donna Hathaway
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Looks like Concord grapes, excellent for wine, Jams and Jellys. My mom used to make a grape pie It was delish!!!!

  • Mary
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Concord grapes

  • Maryann
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Concord grapes I have them also but I am not sure when or how to cut them back I live in middle Tn anyone know ?

  • Kathryn Kelly
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Look up at library or google it or ask at a nursery. I do know you have to prune them pretty severely for them to keep producing.

  • SicilianMa
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Looks like Concord grapes. You can process into grape juice (good to add in fresh fruit smoothies) or can continue making into wine. Can also make a wonderful jelly/jam with them. My mother used to make so many jars of grape jelly we began to run the other way by the time the end of winter came because we were jellied out. We suggested that she wrap them and give them as gifts. That worked out well. You can google how to make these recipes on line or maybe some of the people on this site will share their recipes. Salute!

  • Sharon Clyatt
    on Aug 19, 2013

    I was just wondering if you can eat these kinds like table grapes?

  • Lgsmith
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Could be muscat grapes. My grand dad had a muscat and he never cut them back. Just kept the runners trimmed. His trestle was so thick with the vine we used to play in the shade. Granny had so many grapes she gave them to family and neighbors. This was up in Northeast Alabama.

  • Lynne Sheckles
    on Aug 19, 2013

    They look like Concord to me. For wine make sure they are as ripe as they can get, makes a sweeter wine---

  • Maryann
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Thanks Starla

  • Janet Wyant
    on Aug 20, 2013

    what about a fox grape that's grown in Virginia?

  • Nancy Williams
    on Aug 20, 2013

    Concord grapes, and yes, you can make your own wine, jelly, juice they even make grape pies from concord. I live in a small area where we have 9+ wineries and only 3 stop lights. Several families make their own wine for home use also. They do the trimming in very early spring, never cut them down to ground level. Harvesting begins when the sugar content is up over 20+, which brings the harvesting around early Sept. depends on what kind of weather we've had in the summer. I'm surrounded by concord grapes, and when it's harvesting time, it's like you opened a "Welch's" Jelly Jar"....mmmmm. We also have a Welch's factory here in North East, Pa. N.W.

  • Maryann
    on Aug 20, 2013

    Thanks Nancy I will how far back do you cut ?

    • Nancy Williams
      on Aug 22, 2013

      @ the colder weather, I think they do the trimming in Jan. or Feb. I know the people are bundled up in winter clothing... Try not to harm the older vines or that big stem. We live next to Lake Erie, so it gets really cold here...they should be harvesting the grapes in Sept. here, and when they do, OHHHH, heaven...smells like an open jelly jar! :-) make sure you wash them off before eating...DON'T feed grapes to dogs...not good for them. Enjoy. N.W.

  • Judy
    on Aug 20, 2013

    Do you have any idea how many varieties of purple grapes are out there? The most common is Concord. If it's a slip skin with seeds & tastes like the purple grape juice you buy in the store that's probably what you've got but they really could be any of dozens. This web page is informative re: Concords. http://www.concordgrape.org/bodyfacts.html#question13

  • Emma Santoro-Adkison
    on Aug 20, 2013

    Look like Concords to me. I love Concords.Wine, I would say yes. Also it is the type of grape Welches uses for their jelly.

  • Janet F
    on Aug 22, 2013

    Here in Lodi, CA, the grapes(all varieties) are pruned in the winter months usually January or February. They are pruned back to the original vine leaving only about a 4 - 6 inch stump. The vine looks virtually dead at this point but within a few weeks the new leaves start appearing. We have relatively mild winters with no snow so you should definitely check with your local ag dept. to get the best advice for your area.

  • Maryann
    on Aug 22, 2013

    Thank You thats great help

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