Asked on Aug 19, 2013

Start all over again or plant around

DonnaAnna Marie GustafsonPatty A
+30

Answered

I so much need to do something with my front flower bed. When we laid sod we bumped the mini flower bed out about 6 feet. The photina has to go as it is growing under the edge of the house, the Honeysuckle may or may not go...The old roses are pretty prolific but I'm kind of tired of them. But would like this to look more "cottage-y" so looking for ideas. I wanted to plant an evergreen but changed my mind...I live in pacific northwest....we spend a lot of time below freezing but dont' remember ever getting below zero but have been in the teens, and this gets full head on summer heat of up to 100 several times in summer...
Petunia's were temporary and came out of hanging baskets used for a short time but they need to be pruned terribly!
Petunia's were temporary and came out of hanging baskets used for a short time but they need to be pruned terribly!
Oh and I want a white picket fence but husband doesnt' want to hide the sod...see the yellow spot? seems doggies like the lawn way too much
Oh and I want a white picket fence but husband doesnt' want to hide the sod...see the yellow spot? seems doggies like the lawn way too much
20 answers
  • Beth Cole Byrne
    on Aug 19, 2013

    To get a more cottage look, add some mid-height plants. Yours are lovely, but are either tall or short. Plant them in a staggered pattern rather than in a straight line. If you remove everything and start over, don't plant so close to the house (unless you do espalier). You might also try a curve rather than a straight line border as cottage gardens are less formal.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Excellent advice from Beth. To achieve a cottage garden look, you definitely need more plants, especially those with a loose habit, so that things can weave together.

  • Jackie
    on Aug 19, 2013

    Need a white picket fence trim the taller bushes down. Bring it out from the house in a wandering pattern. Maybe some large boulders here and there.

  • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
    on Aug 19, 2013

    thank you @Beth Cole Byrne and @Douglas Hunt and @Jack. Guess didn't make it plain what I was asking. I really don't like what Is there. I want to either take all of it out and plant as you said from small to tall this year I was too busy with my mom to make any permanent decisions. To achieve a nice cottagey look, Would you leave the roses, and if so what specifically would you plant in front of them? I cut them to about 18 inches in February or they'd get as tall as my house and be long and leggy! Looking for some ideas of what to actually plant....and are the roses move to another area or can they fit in?

  • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
    on Aug 19, 2013

    I am going to probably do some Barberry, we have some that is evergreen (red really) and some that isn't--I like the one that isn't better but having a pretty red in winter if it ever snows would be great..these I have in my cottage garden on the side...

    start all over again or plant around, flowers, gardening, landscape, This is the one that stays redstart all over again or plant around, flowers, gardening, landscape, This one doesn t they look the same but this one has a lighter color on the tips when its new growth and its lovely even if Douglas doesn t like the variegated version
    • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Douglas Hunt Thanks Douglas...we have no problem with them here...the pictures I showed earlier is after having the barberry for about 3 years. I think the weather here helps it to stay in place, just have to trim it kind of like you would any shrub...but its def. prettier than boxwood...

  • To give your bed more curb appeal round out the corner by the sidewald or driveway. Curves are always more attractive than straight lines.

  • Bonnie Bassett
    on Aug 19, 2013

    I think phlox and black-eyed Susan's give a cottage look. I am not a professional just my opinion

  • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
    on Aug 19, 2013

    They are curved possibly doesn't show in the photos I do like Phlox but I'd prefer Echinacia to Black Eyed susan or daisies but they grow so late in the season...but those are good ideas thank you @Bonnie Bassett on my walk this morning I took these two pictures for ideas...

    start all over again or plant around, flowers, gardening, landscapestart all over again or plant around, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
    on Aug 19, 2013

    @Myrna I kind of agree about the "flow thing" what you're calling pycantha is probably my forsythia and it has to go as it is rooting under the foundation of the home, the Honeysuckle has not gone the way I expected, and the roses were here when I arrived. I like soft and simple so sounds like you agree with me to start all over again, will be salvaging them to some other place in the yard though they don't always replant well. The front of the house is also "off balance" with the single picture window on the left I had wanted to the honeysuckle to kind off offset the balance of the missing window but doesn't do it for me. I will keep working on it until it seems right.

  • Paula Gutierrez
    on Aug 20, 2013

    You could also add shutters on either side of your window for a cottage-y look!

  • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
    on Aug 20, 2013

    Because of the huge piece of white around the window we looked into shutters and they looked even worse and more uneven, almost coming to the side of the house. BUT probably next year I am going to completely replace the front window into something I can open and shut and then have something to balance on the other side like a trellis that won't get swallowed up! thank you @Paula Gutierrez

    • Lisa C
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Tanya Peterson Felsheim love that idea and was also thinking you could add items to that wall even a living wreath with blooming succulents that could stand the summer heat!

  • Your roses are a great backdrop but don't provide much winter interest. I would suggest planting something in front of them that will do just that -perhaps some boxwood or yews and then adding some cottagy perennials like phlox or daisies. Make sure you share with us the results.

    • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Heather (New House New Home) I don't care for boxwood but was thinking the red of the barberry would give me a similar feel with some color. thank you for your response

  • Anna Marie Gustafson
    on Aug 20, 2013

    You could curve the bed a bit instead of a straight line...bringing it out maybe two feet more...add an arched metal ornamental pc on the wall to the rt of the window...a large one if money is not an issue. You could add some red garden phlox, some white or deep pink coneflowers, black-eyed susan, pink or purple liatris and keep the roses...add some of the smaller spirea bushes mid way out and maybe the smaller hosta's in front along with other lower growing perennials and annuals for later color...a few fall mums between the spirea for fall interest and some fall sedum...take out the honeysuckle, not very colorful and replace it with mandevilla letting it wind its way upward on the metal arch if you add one. A clematis or two in pots against the back wall, the shorter bush type in a decorative pot would be nice and on one end, maybe a tall thin evergreen...another idea-add a little bit of elevation so the water, when it rains, will not pool against your house or mid bed area... : )

    • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Anna Marie Gustafson the bed is curved, just doesn't show up the way it is....cuz of my postage stamp lawn but it has a sweeping curve on either side thank you for the idea though

  • Lisa C
    on Aug 20, 2013

    I love the roses and you can't get more cottage than roses. I would move the one under the window for the honeysuckle and maybe a white arch over the window with a flowering vine. I love morning glory's and sweet peas! I agree with more plants to fill in and items of interest maybe a few sizes of white pots that can be moved and changed seasonally when it is too hot or too cold. I love to have things flowing out of pots with assorted sizes and colors in them. Love the white picket fence :)

    • Lisa C
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Tanya Peterson Felsheim I understand I have a huge arbor trellis with passion flower growing up both sides but it seems to like the top and the sides are naked so I plant lily's and things to fill in the bottom.

  • Joanna Carrisal
    on Aug 20, 2013

    Since your Hubby doesn't want a picket fence around the yard, you could always put a picket fence around your flower bed. Make it around 2' tall. you can also curve it slightly to make it more appealing. Put it between your roses and Petunias. that way you can still have a burst of color in front of your fence. It would be very cute.

  • Patty A
    on Aug 20, 2013

    My first thought was to trim and definately add something to the right of window ...Anna Marie's idea of an arch or one of those flat trellises against the wall in a fan shape or even square so your roses and clematis will train on this. Arbors, trellises and picket fences with daisy like flowers and phlox spilling over will give you that country garden look.

    • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Patty A One thing that is funny is there is a trellis INSIDE of the honeysuckle that was supposed to do what you're discussing....but the honesuckle basically pulled it down! I think If it were planted more to the center of the house better....but I need to takeout the one rose I think to accomplish what I want....thank you for your response

  • Anna Marie Gustafson
    on Aug 20, 2013

    What I meant was a deep curve. An example would be the right side of our garden space, and mostly the entire garden--deep curves. You lose some yard space but that is less to mow in my beloved's view giggles... Your area is lovely regardless!

    start all over again or plant around, flowers, gardening, landscape
    • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Anna Marie Gustafson that is a beautiful curve! I thought of trying to do that and lay it out different ways and I guess because of the city we are not able to relocate some of my irrigation lines so the best I was able to do was kind of a half oval. I would love to know what you have planted in this area...its very pretty! I'd love to see pictures of peoples gardens like this and what they planted. Going to have to wait a bit till we're out of the hundred degree weather before I do anything permanent. I know I will still have to plant annuals probably. I am getting ready to do a better edging on it I tried with rocks...big mistake...so I'm going to do some things I"ve seen online that keeps it so mower can reach it all without having to "weedeat" after.

  • Anna Marie Gustafson
    on Aug 20, 2013

    I dig trenches around the bricks--next spring I will use preen in the trenches...easier to keep weed free, we hate to weed-wack! Lots of stuff in this area-to name some--one Japanese Maple in a pot-new this year, the larger one is in two years-acer pal., by the statue (a free gift from a neighbor with weather damage but we like it that way), blue balloon flowers, three knockout rose bushes (we keep ours on the smaller side on the ends and let the middle one go a bit larger--pink and red ones, in the back, anise hyssop-tall and purple tips (agastache), three mums not in the pic-we just planted, a fern and nasturtium and and two hosta under the larger Japanese Maple, some hybridized daylilies from a friend of a friend who does the hybridizing, here and there groups of liatris (pinks), a little henry bush on the far end, may not see it in this pic-iris around a small birdbath also may not see but on that end bed. We have two sprays of guara, some type of red robin (I forget giggles), pink flowers and delicate looking on the far end, maybe not seen, the white flowered bushes name escapes me lol I will post my facebook page link--if you want to friend me and look at my albums you may--we are gardeners for 3.5 years now in earnest...friends who are master gardeners and some not quite but very generous in sharing so our garden has grown the last year especially...here it my link..we started by viewing others gardens--so it is good to do for sure, creating from what others bring to their garden... https://www.facebook.com/AnnaRaven

    start all over again or plant around, flowers, gardening, landscape
    • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
      on Aug 20, 2013

      @Anna Marie Gustafson thank you! I will keep these in mind. I used to have a japanese maple in the front area but the heat just really takes its toll...we put it into a pot and put in the backyard so it still gets the sun but not straight on overhead 100 degree heat.

  • Anna Marie Gustafson
    on Aug 20, 2013

    Mine had curled and was crunchy last year with high 90's and I stripped all leaves, within 3 weeks I had nice little baby leaves all over...some say this does not always work but I figured I would try rather than ditch the tree...

  • Donna
    on Sep 29, 2016

    @ Anna Marie Gustafson. A number of years ago I planted a Japanese Maple n my front yard that was shaded by a huge, hundred plus yr old, four trunk River Birch... unfortunately, I had to have the Birch taken down year before last due to disease. This left my poor, now 15' Maple exposed to the 100+ temps in the full sun of Oklahoma summers ... the leaves do get crunchy by late July, but so far it's made it through two summers and comes out beautifully the following spring ... in other words, don't get rid of it😎

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